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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > how do you decide what to brew?
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Old 02-15-2013, 02:38 PM   #21
SagamoreAle
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If I can buy it, usually I don't make it.

One of my baseline beers is an ESB that I've fine-tuned to something I really really like.

I do a lot of historical ales. One of my favorite references is "Old British Beers And How To Make Them" by the Durden Park Beer Circle. (self published, google if you're interested).

I also use "American Handy Book of the Brewing, Malting and Auxiliary Trades" published in 1901 by Robert Wahl and Max Heinus. A collection of pre-prohibition brewing techniques and beer styles. Available on Google Books. Includes a direct description of the elusive Kentucky Common.

There are plenty of other good historical brewing references on Google Books of you're interested.

I use source material as much as possible, rather than following directions from a web side that copied something from some other website that came from a homebrew forum that was copied from rec.craft.brewing (etc...get my drift?).

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Old 02-15-2013, 02:43 PM   #22
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I, like some others have said, go the seasonal route. In winter I'll have a stout and an IPA/ something kinda hoppy. In summer the stout gets switched for something light and session-y. The exact recipes I use vary constantly except for my wife's wheat, which is year-round. I brew what sounds tasty. Kyle

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Old 02-15-2013, 06:26 PM   #23
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Thanks for all the info, this site has proved to be a wealth of information.
I might have to experiment with 1 gallon batches.

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Old 02-15-2013, 08:45 PM   #24
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I look at my pipeline. I then think about about what I feel like drinking. This can change by season. I do a like a good variety of brews in my pipeline, but I always have an IPA around. I have a big pipeline of Belgians, but because they age so well I keep brewing more of them. I like Saisons, especially in the summer so I have been brewing them a lot lately to stock up for the summer. In the winter I always have some stout for my nitro tap, but also often put an Irish Red on nitro. I often will have a wheat beer in the pipeline and also aa good Amber ale. There are a lot of beers I like so I just brew them when I know I will run low on them.

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Old 02-15-2013, 08:51 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SagamoreAle View Post
If I can buy it, usually I don't make it.

One of my baseline beers is an ESB that I've fine-tuned to something I really really like.

I do a lot of historical ales. One of my favorite references is "Old British Beers And How To Make Them" by the Durden Park Beer Circle. (self published, google if you're interested).

I also use "American Handy Book of the Brewing, Malting and Auxiliary Trades" published in 1901 by Robert Wahl and Max Heinus. A collection of pre-prohibition brewing techniques and beer styles. Available on Google Books. Includes a direct description of the elusive Kentucky Common.

There are plenty of other good historical brewing references on Google Books of you're interested.

I use source material as much as possible, rather than following directions from a web side that copied something from some other website that came from a homebrew forum that was copied from rec.craft.brewing (etc...get my drift?).
Where were you in my what to brew for 1920's themed party thread? :-p

But to answer the OP's question. I tend to brew mostly new recipes I've made myself from the bases of rock solid recipes I've found on the internet and made previously. Sometimes I try to emulate a beer I love, or to focus in on a flavor I'm craving. This winter was focused on heavy, imperial beers, this summer is looking to be a focus on lighter session ales and lagers.

I always try to add a new technique to each session or to just work with a ingredient I've never used before. I think it helps me grow.
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