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Old 03-25-2013, 03:25 PM   #121
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Originally Posted by unionrdr View Post
You don't prime when kegging. That's the co2 cylinder's job. But some do use kegs for primary & secondary. Even priming in the keg. But it'd be exactly the same as in the UK where they have that plastic barrel on the counter to prime the beer in. Kinda like a poorman's keg. Crap I says. I'll bottle it,thank you,& won't loose carbonation as the bottle empties. Unlike priming in kegs or plastic barrels.
I think what your refering to is when priming a firkin/cask and ONLY pushing with the pressure of the secondary ferm/priming pressure through the engine.
This does loose considerable carb towards the end but usually any beer served by this method has a low carb per style.

I almost always prime in my keg

1.Only have room for 2 kegs in the fridge and if i have a 3rd i need to get on gas and carb i could just prime and seal with gas instead of leaving in on. The sugar carbs the beer so that when im ready to put it in the fridge i can drink it next day instead of waiting another week.
2. YOU SAVE ON CO2, Its a PITA to get tanks and I like to do it as little as possible, because i prime i tend to get around 10-13 kegs for a 5lb bottle and change it out every 6months or so.
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:26 PM   #122
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Correct. But when people say that you should take into account your hourly wage when determining the cost of your homebrew it implies that the opportunity cost of homebrewing is paid work. I would assume most people brew in their time off and do not take annual leave to brew so the opportunity cost of brewing is not paid work (at least for me - if there is no extra work to do then my employer won't pay me for any hours more than 40 a week) and therefore you should not factor your time into the cost of your beer.
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:30 PM   #123
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As I understand it, this myth has only been fairly recently "busted." The cite is the FAQ on the Lallemand Danstar website:

http://www.danstaryeast.com/frequently-asked-questions

I guess you should email Danstar and tell them they are wrong about their product.
I guess you didn't read & understand adequately. The EXTRA yeast in the DRY packet is there ONLY so you don't HAVE to aerate. But aerating saves those EXTRA yeast to cut lag time when rehydrated.
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Looks like I was wrong about that. I find this evidence sufficient to change my position.
Hmm,didn't print your quote. Anyway,it's reconstituting chemicals needed for strong cell walls. but not just from chemicals it contains. It needs o2 as a catalist for the process. So aerating even moderately is def a benifit vs not aerating at all. No aeration makes for higher attrition rates in dry yeast. Period. That's why there are extra cells in dry yeast packets...
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Lot's of people prime with sugar in corny kegs.
Not that many out of all those that can afford kegging equipment. Most buy kegs,etc so they don't have to bulk prime & wait. And if you prime in a keg with sugar solution,as I said before,it's no better than bulk priming in those plastic barrel things common in the UK. As the beer empties out,co2 comes out of the beer to equalize the pressure in the empty head space. Leaving increasing flatter beer due to the increasing empty head space.
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:36 PM   #124
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I guess you didn't read & understand adequately. The EXTRA yeast in the DRY packet is there ONLY so you don't HAVE to aerate. But aerating saves those EXTRA yeast to cut lag time when rehydrated.
That doesn't make any sense w.r.t. the biochemistry involved, and it certainly isn't what Clayton Cone was saying in that post. Oxygen is necessary for sterol production, which is necessary for yeast population growth. Danstar argues that there are sufficient sterols and yeast in the packet already. Whether or not that's true is one thing, but adding oxygen wouldn't cut lag time in any sense...nor do you want to cut lag time...
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:38 PM   #125
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And if you prime in a keg with sugar solution,as I said before,it's no better than bulk priming in those plastic barrel things common in the UK. As the beer empties out,co2 comes out of the beer to equalize the pressure in the empty head space. Leaving increasing flatter beer due to the increasing empty head space.

Pretty sure anyone who bulk primes in a keg still pushes the resulting beer with CO2, so they're not just "draining" and it shouldn't cause CO2 to come out of solution any differently than if it were force carbed and then lowered to serving pressure.
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:42 PM   #126
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You can defiantly save money. I can make 5 gallons of IPA for 50-60$ and it costs 100$ if I buy it in the grocery store. I make extract batches so far but you save even more if you do all grain. The equipment is the only other thing that costs money but its a one time expense. What am I missing here?
I tend to agree since I average about $0.58 per bottle (all grain) including custom maps from Bottlemark.... BUT, I find that I cannot stop dreaming about equipment. I have absolutely everything I need to make great beer for the rest of my life, and yet now I find myself researching a RIMS build for my mash tun. When will it ever stop?
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:45 PM   #127
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Not that many out of all those that can afford kegging equipment. Most buy kegs,etc so they don't have to bulk prime & wait. And if you prime in a keg with sugar solution,as I said before,it's no better than bulk priming in those plastic barrel things common in the UK. As the beer empties out,co2 comes out of the beer to equalize the pressure in the empty head space. Leaving increasing flatter beer due to the increasing empty head space.
OK- I will grant your first claim. Most keggers I know don't prime in the keg.

Claim number two is pushing it. Bottling is a pain because you have to clean and sanitize and cap all the bottles. Of the whole operation, batch priming is the easiest thing. So I disagree that people want to keg so they don't have to batch prime.

I will give you that time is an advantage of force carbing in a keg over priming in a keg or bottles.

Your final claim, sorry, I have to call BS. When you prime in the keg, you can still hook the keg up to your CO2 to maintain carbonation all the way to through the batch. I usually draw the first 5-10 pints with the natural CO2 and then hook up the gas, but sometimes I vent the keg and hook up the gas line from the get-go.
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:46 PM   #128
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Not that many out of all those that can afford kegging equipment. Most buy kegs,etc so they don't have to bulk prime & wait. And if you prime in a keg with sugar solution,as I said before,it's no better than bulk priming in those plastic barrel things common in the UK. As the beer empties out,co2 comes out of the beer to equalize the pressure in the empty head space. Leaving increasing flatter beer due to the increasing empty head space.
No and no. Have you even tried keg priming?
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:46 PM   #129
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That doesn't make any sense w.r.t. the biochemistry involved, and it certainly isn't what Clayton Cone was saying in that post. Oxygen is necessary for sterol production, which is necessary for yeast population growth. Danstar argues that there are sufficient sterols and yeast in the packet already. Whether or not that's true is one thing, but adding oxygen wouldn't cut lag time in any sense...nor do you want to cut lag time...
I said it because I've done it. Once again,I've spoken from experience & ben called a fool,liar or whatever. I've seen aeration cut lag time when paired with rehydrating & closely matching temps with the wort. It's just one piece of the complete process imo. Once again,these are observations of my own paired with what I'm learning of the processes involved. Interesting how these flaming wars start...one guy speaks his mind,one guy jumps on him,then others start jumping on him. It's the mob rules human mentality all over again.
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:50 PM   #130
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I said it because I've done it. Once again,I've spoken from experience & ben called a fool,liar or whatever. I've seen aeration cut lag time when paired with rehydrating & closely matching temps with the wort. It's just one piece of the complete process imo. Once again,these are observations of my own paired with what I'm learning of the processes involved. Interesting how these flaming wars start...one guy speaks his mind,one guy jumps on him,then others start jumping on him. It's the mob rules human mentality all over again.
They're starting because you're spouting anecdotal evidence in a topic that requires a lot more proof and significance than that.
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