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Old 02-22-2014, 09:15 PM   #31
patto1ro
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Hello Ron,

A question about scotch ale (or at least the styles of beer we in north america call scottish ale and "wee heavy") Where do they come from? They don't seem related to scotch ale recipes in your book? Do you have any old examples that fit the myth (ie, low IBUs, caramelizing the 1st runnings and low attenuation)? Its clearly not as old a style as people would like to believe but it must have its origins somewhere.

Thanks,
Edward
I've no evidence of caramelising wort. Low attenuation is real though.


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Old 02-28-2014, 07:53 PM   #32
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I bought a copy at Barnes and Noble today. It looks really interesting, I was glad to find it on the shelf.



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Old 03-03-2014, 05:57 PM   #33
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Patto, (or anyone) do you know what style was served to crew on sailing ships? Either navy or commercial? I'm a sailor, on wooden boats, and I think I'd like to brew a sailor's beer. I suspect that porter, popular in the 19th century, was probably favored, maybe switching to IPA at some point for it's durability.

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Old 03-03-2014, 06:48 PM   #34
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Patto, (or anyone) do you know what style was served to crew on sailing ships? Either navy or commercial? I'm a sailor, on wooden boats, and I think I'd like to brew a sailor's beer. I suspect that porter, popular in the 19th century, was probably favored, maybe switching to IPA at some point for it's durability.
Good question, to which I don't have a very definite answer.

In some periods, it must have been Porter. Just because of its huge popularity. I doubt it was ever IPA, because that was the drink of the upper classes. Mild Ale is the other likely candidate. Again because that's just what most people drank in a certain period.
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Old 03-04-2014, 01:57 AM   #35
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Thanks. Google didn't help either. It reveals quantities, but not style. I have a decent sailing history library, maybe I can find something.

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Old 03-05-2014, 04:05 AM   #36
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I LOVE this book (spiral bound). I discovered it, and Ron, and the blog on the Beersmith podcast and realized how little I knew about brewing history and how much of what I knew was wrong! The book gives me a better background to understand the tons of info on the blog (and in the self published books).

Will have to read it several more times plus the blog to answer even some of my basic questions. For instance, some beers are clearly stock vs mild while others I'm unsure how long to age. And would all of the stock beers need to be aged with a bit of Brett when trying to be reasonably historically accurate? So much to learn

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Old 03-05-2014, 06:43 AM   #37
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I LOVE this book (spiral bound). I discovered it, and Ron, and the blog on the Beersmith podcast and realized how little I knew about brewing history and how much of what I knew was wrong! The book gives me a better background to understand the tons of info on the blog (and in the self published books).

Will have to read it several more times plus the blog to answer even some of my basic questions. For instance, some beers are clearly stock vs mild while others I'm unsure how long to age. And would all of the stock beers need to be aged with a bit of Brett when trying to be reasonably historically accurate? So much to learn
Yes the Stock beers before WW I - and that includes a lot of Pale Ales - would have had some Brettanimyces character. But that would be Brettanomyces cluasenii, which doesn't producce a huge amount of sourness.

These are the ageing times given as evidence to a parliamentary committee in 1899:

Stock ale: 4 to 12 months
Semi-stock pale bottling beers: 3 months
Light pale ales (A.K.) 2 to 4 weeks
Mild ale four to ten days


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