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Old 07-19-2012, 02:29 PM   #101
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Everybody knows the secret is facial hair.

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Old 07-19-2012, 04:15 PM   #102
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Everybody knows the secret is facial hair.
Do you have to mash that?
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Old 07-19-2012, 04:24 PM   #103
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Nope, just harvest the wild yeast from it.

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Old 07-19-2012, 07:03 PM   #104
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Mines orange. I get pretty good efficiency from my 5 gal mlt but don't know how I will ever get over 1.070. Doesn't matter much, 6% is good enough. Sorry OT...

Back to the subject, I noticed much difference in my extract batches but a more balanced and worthy beer when switching to AG. I have read the "twang" word thrown out a couple times. Has anyone experienced this "twang"? I must admit, my beers get better as I refine my process but was the "twang" a matter of being a greenhorn or a matter of process? The flavor of my beers changed dramatically almost overnight when switching to AG. One moment of clarity came when I bought a chest freezer to control ferm temps. I agree with most everyone about refining your process but concentrating on one variable each session helped me understand what I did right/wrong and how it influenced the taste. My next variable is water.
I think the reduction in "twang" when people switch to AG has a lot to do with increased focus on process and fresher ingredients. Correlation vs causation IMO.

My beers stopped tasting like "homebrew" when I started paying more attention to mash pH (following the water primer), pitching the right amount of yeast, oxygenated with real O2, and controlled fermentation temps.

Its hard for me to say which had the most effect since all of those happened over a relatively short period of time. But man, it made a lot of difference. I love taking a drink and having that gut reaction of "I'd totally pay for this beer." Doesn't always happen, but its happening more and more.
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Old 07-19-2012, 08:56 PM   #105
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I love taking a drink and having that gut reaction of "I'd totally pay for this beer." Doesn't always happen, but its happening more and more.
Yes!!! It is second only to sex. A close third is holding your piss for an hour and then finally letting go when you get to a chance. Ever stand in a port-a-potty line at an NFL game tailgate and you will know what I mean. The best is drinking one of these stellar brews while having sex!!! YES!! to the second power! Sorry, fading back in from dream sequence.

When making the switch to AG, I was much more attentive in what I was doing. I think that Revvy hit it on the head. BTW, where is the OP now? Hopefully he is making better beer. I know I will!
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:36 AM   #106
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i'm sure he is.......

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Old 07-25-2012, 02:37 PM   #107
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I had a "homebrewed" flavor in all of the beers I brewed with Ozarka natural spring water. A buddy picked up distilled for a partial mash by accident and that beer did not have the flavor. A couple more attempts later and a side by side experiment proved that the water was the culprit. (The LME provides all the nutrients needed by the yeast except zinc.)

Now when I brew AG, I'll use distilled water with some salts to create the profile I need (honestly I usually just buy a pack of burton water salts from Austin Homebrew and use that). If I brew partial mashes, I just use straight distilled water. Behind controlling fermentation temps, this made the biggest improvement to my beer.

This is interesting. I brew extract kits with steeping grains. I use tap water for the initial 2.5 gallon boil and then use Ozarka Spring Water.

I get a slight background taste that is something like what the OP describes. Not something bad, but an element I can taste in every beer I brew that makes them somewhat similar. I've always wondered about it. Maybe it could be the water?

I'd love to just use tap water, but it's so much easier just to throw one of those Ozarka's in the freezer while you're brewing so the top-off water helps get the temp down.

I may try something different next time and see what happens.
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Old 07-26-2012, 12:31 PM   #108
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I can get all technical and stuff, but it's too early for that, so let me just say that when brewing all grain, you need some salts in the water to help extract some of the yeast nutrients. So straight distilled water won't work.

However, if you use extract, it is supposed to contain pretty much all the nutrients the yeast need. The only thing it doesn't have is zinc. So if you like using something from out of the freezer and because you do partial mash (extract w/ steeping grains), grab the distilled water instead of the spring water. It can't hurt anything.

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Old 07-26-2012, 01:04 PM   #109
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I know somebody has to know what im talking about. what is the homebrew taste. It's not any type of infection. Ive tasted other old homebrewers beer that doesnt seem to have it and they wont really let their secret out. Kegging seems to have a little less of the homebrew taste. water is fine. I do all grain sparge batching (no extract) and have a freezer i ferment in so the temp isnt all over the place. I am extremely clean and sanitary. Can anybody explain or expand on the subject..........


I think I know what you're talking about. My guess is young beer. It seems as if the last few beers out of a keg are great, but before that, not so great. Be sure the beer is fully fermented and allow a couple of extra weeks cleanup time. Wait 30 days after kegging to try it.

Bob
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Old 07-26-2012, 03:30 PM   #110
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I think I know what you're talking about. My guess is young beer. It seems as if the last few beers out of a keg are great, but before that, not so great. Be sure the beer is fully fermented and allow a couple of extra weeks cleanup time. Wait 30 days after kegging to try it.

Bob
Disagree. There are plenty of brewers on this site (incl. me) that can go grain-to-glass in 2-3 weeks and not have this "homebrew flavor" that OP describes.
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