Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Hobby or Job?

View Poll Results: Hobby or Job
Hobby 77 53.47%
Hobby(maybe a job in the future) 57 39.58%
Job right now 10 6.94%
Voters: 144. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-02-2012, 02:22 PM   #31
JGowls
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Langhorne, Pennsylvania
Posts: 27
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IrregularPulse View Post
Its the standard pipe dream of most HBT'ers when they first start out and the obsession sets in.
Yeah, right now I would say this is what I'm going through coupled with the fact that I graduate college soon and don't know what type of work I want to do when I'm out
__________________
JGowls is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 02:30 PM   #32
kaconga
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Rathdrum, Idaho
Posts: 756
Liked 100 Times on 76 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Ask me in 20 years when I retire from my really good paying job that has benefits. Would I be happier brewing? Probably, but my wife and kids would suffer for my choice. But retiring at 55 I could see myself making a go of it as a business.

__________________
kaconga is offline
bierhaus15 Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 02:42 PM   #33
Seedly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Broomfield, CO
Posts: 86
Liked 13 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I've mulled this one over many a home-brew, and I realized after not too long that the part that was the most fun, interesting, and exciting thing about home-brewing was creating. Sadly, as a brewery, your going to be doing 95% production, marketing, sales, and paperwork and 5% creative work with the beer (if your lucky and do lots of risky seasonal and short run brews).

Oh sure, it would be a "dream" once it was the size of Sam Adams or New Belgium and there was enough business to support the crazy owner's wacky ideas.

If I ever do turn this hobby into a business, I will likely stick closer to my wheel-house with a retail shop. And to the nay-sayers, it is possible to run a brick and mortar just as profitably as an online shop. You have higher overhead, but generally better convenience, as your product is available right now (which is handy when you realize that in all that playing with the recipe and adding and removing of things from your cart...you never added back the yeast...).

Also, you might be shocked to learn how many LHBSs get regular shipments from places like MoreBeer. Its faster for them, the prices are likely only 10-15% higher than their normal supplier (for some things like grains), and there is no minimum order. If your not going to move 55lbs of Belgian Special B in a year, it certainly doesnt make sense to be buying it in such large lots...especially when a maltster is going to want to know how many sacks you want (and 1 is a silly answer).

Everyone is cost conscious today, but people still do pay for convenience, whether its $10 for two day air or an extra $5 at a LHBS.

__________________
Seedly is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 03:21 PM   #34
RmikeVT
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 607
Liked 74 Times on 64 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrinkNoH2O View Post
Brewing and running a LHBS are two totally different things. With the cheap shipping these days I don't see how it's possible to earn a decent living running a LHBS. Online retailers are where it's at.
I have two local shops that are 20 minutes from my house that are just as competitive as anything online when it comes to ingredients, and usually cost less once you factor in online store's shipping charges. They charge a bit of a premium for equipment which I would expect. They give great advise and customer service is outstanding.
__________________
RmikeVT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 03:27 PM   #35
RmikeVT
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 607
Liked 74 Times on 64 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I might have to go Pro when I get canned from my corporate job because I spent too much time on the internet reading HBT.

__________________
RmikeVT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 03:28 PM   #36
bierhaus15
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: , New York
Posts: 1,511
Liked 71 Times on 51 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I was recently in a position to work at a brewery full time, but it didn't work out and I'm actually somewhat glad it went that way. The truth of brewery jobs is that they pay practically nothing, have no real job security, and require endless hours of work with little long term financial benefit. Then there is the fact that most brewery jobs are not the creative opportunities we think they are, it's just doing the same thing over and over again.

While I have a passion for beer, I'm content keeping homebrewing as a hobby. However, if you truly love being around beer and are content working in a job with little financial reward, brewing professionally can be an 'ok' gig too.

__________________
bierhaus15 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 03:42 PM   #37
jwitt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Belleville, IL
Posts: 60
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

I know the thread is really about brewing for a living, but I'm part timing at my LHBS 3 days a week, and really that time spent earning money by being involved in a hobby just gets me more involved in the hobby- helping new brewers and winemakers, learning from experienced ones, and simply having an excuse for thinking of and learning about brewing all the time. And I can definitely say that at least in the StL area there is plenty of demand for a brick and mortar homebrew shop. I'm pleased with the volume we do considering the economy still isn't exactly booming. Many customers place orders with the big online retailers, but a large portion of their stuff comes from us. I think we're able to stay fairly competitive because we're able to do enough volume to get one or two skids from the distributor each week.

Of course, I'm in no way qualified to be a professional brewer- maybe packaging, cleaning the mash tun, driving a forklift, or working in the office I'd be happy to take on a job like that at a micro, because I've always been happiest at jobs that involve manufacturing a product.

Speaking of professional brewers having to give up creativity- a few of the newer St Louis micros certainly don't have that problem. They generally produce a few traditional styles and a few on the avant garde end of the spectrum, and are constantly rolling out casks of interesting stuff at local bars.

__________________

Recent brews: Amber ale w/ honey malt, Dunkelweizen, Oktoberfest, Alt, Kölsch, English Brown, Rye IPA, Amarillo IPA. 55 gallons so far in 2013.

jwitt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 04:40 PM   #38
Whattawort
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Whattawort's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: East Bumfark, Yonder
Posts: 912
Liked 98 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 34

Default

I'd like to do it, but I'd find a master brewer to head the actual brewing and I'd help and worry about the business itself. Can't have the master worried about anything other than good beer. The catch is, we'd only serve what we liked to make. That's where the fun gets sucked out of the job. I've seen it happen to a few of my friends who opened up various craft shops. They love their jobs and the craft(s) itself, but as soon as you have to do something that you don't like make or do, the pressure of perfecting that for the customer becomes tedious and frustrating. Keep that up, and your attitude and product go out the window. The ideal start up situation would be to have 1 (possibly 2) flagship beer and offer a rotating seasonal or specialty. But you're not going anywhere unless you have a solid business plan and can sell the business to investors...or you have a crapload of money to dump into it.

__________________

Bottled - Swamp Water Mead
Kegged - Ryerish Red
Fermenting - Plinius Maior

“For a quart of Ale is a dish for a king.”
― William Shakespeare

Whattawort is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 04:43 PM   #39
Nightshade
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Richland, WA
Posts: 1,421
Liked 191 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 210

Default

I brew as both a hobby and job, but mostly a job lately

__________________
Nightshade is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 04:45 PM   #40
Nightshade
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Richland, WA
Posts: 1,421
Liked 191 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 210

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whattawort View Post
I'd like to do it, but I'd find a master brewer to head the actual brewing and I'd help and worry about the business itself. Can't have the master worried about anything other than good beer. The catch is, we'd only serve what we liked to make. That's where the fun gets sucked out of the job. I've seen it happen to a few of my friends who opened up various craft shops. They love their jobs and the craft(s) itself, but as soon as you have to do something that you don't like make or do, the pressure of perfecting that for the customer becomes tedious and frustrating. Keep that up, and your attitude and product go out the window. The ideal start up situation would be to have 1 (possibly 2) flagship beer and offer a rotating seasonal or specialty. But you're not going anywhere unless you have a solid business plan and can sell the business to investors...or you have a crapload of money to dump into it.
This is a big key...you brew what you like and if someone comes in and doesn't like it then they can go somewhere else. There will be enough who like your brews to keep you going....unless you crash your beer at 1.030 and serve it green
__________________
Nightshade is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Selling/hobby TwentyDuce General Beer Discussion 21 08-02-2011 04:52 PM
Im loving this new hobby turnaround89 General Beer Discussion 8 07-12-2011 06:23 AM
Any one use their hobby to help their child grinder143 General Beer Discussion 21 02-25-2011 04:04 AM
Most frustrating hobby ever? tubz General Beer Discussion 47 02-12-2011 09:16 AM
I've bled for this hobby! vicratlhead51 General Beer Discussion 26 10-26-2010 05:48 PM