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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Hefeweizen vs Belgian Wit
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Old 02-16-2008, 09:58 PM   #1
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Default Hefeweizen vs Belgian Wit

Hey guys,

I was walking around today thinking about beer and what equipment I should use to build a MLT to start my partial mashing when a thought popped into my head.

What are the differences between a hefeweizen and a wit beer?

All I know (and correct me if I'm wrong) they are both wheat beers. Hefe is served with a lemon and wits with an orange. Hefe from Germany and Wits from Belgium? Also I'm guessing Wits can have spices like corriander or orange zest where a hefe probably wouldn't.

I guess I need to try them side by side.

Any thoughts?

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Old 02-17-2008, 04:07 AM   #2
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I would subtract the orange slice and lemon wedge from the equation, as they are more serving preference (or mistake) than beer difference. The malt bill and hopping are pretty interchangeable on the two beer, except that a German wheat would use wheat malt, and the Belgians unmalted wheat. Also, as you said, the inclusion of spices, Germans have none, Belgians probably contain corriander seeds, orange peel/ zest, (and even chamomile, cumin, anise, nutmeg). THe yeast is a big component in both beers. German wheat yeasts add a big banana and some clove, perhaps even a bit of bubble gum to the aroma; Belgians are spicey, fruity but lack the banana that you often find with other Belgian yeasts.
Hope that is useful.

PS a bucket with a false bottom works great.

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Old 02-17-2008, 04:12 AM   #3
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+1. Nothing to add, really...catfish covered it. I'll reiterate the "no fruit slices in beer" rule. MF'ers often add lemons to hefes to cover up the fact that the beer suxxorz. Widmer is a bland hefe...and doesn't suffer from adding lemon---but you wouldn't do that to a Schneider Weisse!

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Old Today, 04:21 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catfish View Post
I would subtract the orange slice and lemon wedge from the equation, as they are more serving preference (or mistake) than beer difference. The malt bill and hopping are pretty interchangeable on the two beer, except that a German wheat would use wheat malt, and the Belgians unmalted wheat. Also, as you said, the inclusion of spices, Germans have none, Belgians probably contain corriander seeds, orange peel/ zest, (and even chamomile, cumin, anise, nutmeg). THe yeast is a big component in both beers. German wheat yeasts add a big banana and some clove, perhaps even a bit of bubble gum to the aroma; Belgians are spicey, fruity but lack the banana that you often find with other Belgian yeasts.
Hope that is useful.

PS a bucket with a false bottom works great.
Catfish=
Great info thank uuuu!!
I'm very new to the beer scene, or should I say the craft beer scene. Beers I find are 100 times more in depth than wine and I thought wine wad confusing!
Another question about hefe vs. Belgian wits .... are both styles "unfiltered?"
Are the Belgian wits usually lighter in color due to less malt? Are my questions retarded?
I guess I'm looking for a simple one or two sentence answer to the difference between both styles? Am I being too high maintenance?

Thank you !!!
Leah
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