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Old 10-22-2010, 05:12 PM   #1
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Default Heat stick questions (im sure im gonna get flamed for this but im confused)

Ok, got just a few questions about this. I've read through numerous DIY threads and i think im probably over thinking this. Ok, first im working with a 15A GFI, and i was going to build a 1500W heat stick to supplement my electric stove. Im assuming to use 14/3 wire on this application? Also i've noticed people doing calculations using 240v to get the actual wattage of the elements. If im buying a 110v 1500W element, is it going to be 1500W or do i need something bigger to achieve 1500W? Im very good at builiding things, im just having a hard time understanding all the calculations to get the actual wattage, as well as what type of wire is needed to run said heat stick.

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Old 10-22-2010, 05:30 PM   #2
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This should be posted in the electrical forum. You'll probably get more answers there. a 2000w element will get you 1389 watts. For this you would need a 20 amp circuit as it will be pulling 16.5 amps. 14g will be enough for 1500w. For 2000 i used 12/2 SJ cord.

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Old 10-22-2010, 05:34 PM   #3
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im working with a 15A GFI, and i was going to build a 1500W heat stick to supplement my electric stove. Im assuming to use 14/3 wire on this application?
I would check the amp rating of the cord. The insulation used on the wires and length of the cord have an impact on the amp rating. For in-wall house wiring, 14 gauge will handle 15A, but I've seen many 14/3 extension cords that claim only 13A rating.

Your 1500W element is going to draw about 13A, so... it should handle it, but you can always go bigger on the wire gauge to be safer.

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Also i've noticed people doing calculations using 240v to get the actual wattage of the elements. If im buying a 110v 1500W element, is it going to be 1500W or do i need something bigger to achieve 1500W? Im very good at builiding things, im just having a hard time understanding all the calculations to get the actual wattage, as well as what type of wire is needed to run said heat stick.
If your element is sold as a 1500W/110V element, then it is going to produce 1500W when run with 110V.

Elements sold as <whatever>Watt/240V will produce <whatever> watts at 240V, but can also be run on 120V and will produce only 1/4 of the watts. So, 5500W/240V element running on 120V is effectively a 1375W element.

But... never run an element on 240V if it was meant/sold as one for 120V. It will produce 4 times the advertised watts and will almost certainly burn up.
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Old 10-22-2010, 05:35 PM   #4
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a 2000w element will get you 1389 watts.
Huh? What do you mean a 2000W element will get you 1389W?
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Old 10-22-2010, 05:38 PM   #5
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I would check the amp rating of the cord. The insulation used on the wires and length of the cord have an impact on the amp rating. For in-wall house wiring, 14 gauge will handle 15A, but I've seen many 14/3 extension cords that claim only 13A rating.

Your 1500W element is going to draw about 13A, so... it should handle it, but you can always go bigger on the wire gauge to be safer.



If your element is sold as a 1500W/110V element, then it is going to produce 1500W when run with 110V.

Elements sold as <whatever>Watt/240V will produce <whatever> watts at 240V, but can also be run on 120V and will produce only 1/4 of the watts. So, 5500W/240V element running on 120V is effectively a 1375W element.

But... never run an element on 240V if it was meant/sold as one for 120V. It will produce 4 times the advertised watts and will almost certainly burn up.
Dude, you are awesome You just cleared up everything for me in one post.
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Old 10-22-2010, 05:50 PM   #6
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If it's an element meant to run on 110v, then that's the wattage you'll get at 110v.

If you're needing to figure out your amps, here's a handy website with all the calculations you need:
http://www.the12volt.com/ohm/ohmslaw.asp

So, you'll be pulling 13.64 amps which is awfully close to your 15amp circuit...

EDIT: Man I'm a slow poster...

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Old 10-22-2010, 06:15 PM   #7
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Huh? What do you mean a 2000W element will get you 1389W?
That is the number that the electric brewing spreadsheet is giving me. I guess what they assume is that there is resistance in the current draw therefore reducing the usable amount of wattage from the element. When I type in a 2000w element it gives me that number. Everyone swears by that spreadsheet so I figured I'd get my numbers from it for this post.

Looking at it again. The spreadsheet had 100w in it as the actual voltage. Which IMO would be wrong (unless of course there is some kind of attenuation going on. My bad.
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Old 10-22-2010, 06:24 PM   #8
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CoalCracker...

I'm with you now. If the element is sold as 2000W/120V and you run it on 100V, then you will indeed get 1389W of effective power from the element.

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Old 10-26-2010, 06:59 PM   #9
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CoalCracker...

I'm with you now. If the element is sold as 2000W/120V and you run it on 100V, then you will indeed get 1389W of effective power from the element.
Aren't most outlets 120v?
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Old 10-26-2010, 07:30 PM   #10
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CoalCracker...

I'm with you now. If the element is sold as 2000W/120V and you run it on 100V, then you will indeed get 1389W of effective power from the element.

If you're running on 100 volts, you're either in Japan, or you're having one hell of a brownout.
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