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Old 01-18-2013, 11:48 PM   #631
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Originally Posted by skibb View Post
No crystal or Amarillo...
Why not sub wheat or flaked barley for carapils? Lots of pro brewers go this route as they are generally substantially less in cost than carapils.
I'm not sure Amarillo was ever excluded for a fact. Citra was, but I think Amarillo is still in the mix.
FWIW....I don't count Cara as crystal either.
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Old 01-19-2013, 01:21 AM   #632
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Hmmm, never thought of honey malt. I was just at the brew shop this afternoon and was telling them I had a recipe with Munich and Pearl and needed a little more sweetness, not much, but some. They had no ideas. I was thinking I might be able to get the feeling of sweetness from a hop lineup change.

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Old 01-19-2013, 03:48 AM   #633
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I believe Pearl is confirmed....look at the grain bag in the lower right corner!

pearl.jpg  
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Old 01-19-2013, 04:32 AM   #634
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I believe Pearl is confirmed....look at the grain bag in the lower right corner!
Finally a grain bag! I've been looking at facebook pics for months trying to catch a glimpse of one, or some hops. This is the first I've ever seen. Were you there or did you find the pic?
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Old 01-19-2013, 04:38 AM   #635
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Was just reading a new article on the Alchemist expansion, it says they will triple production in a few months. That would be 1800 cases a week up from 600.

"And, Heady Topper’s success is giving John Kimmich a chance to do something he hasn’t done since the brewpub days — experiment with new beers. The brewery will soon offer monthly 30-barell runs of different brews, which will only be sold in growlers"

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Old 01-19-2013, 05:01 AM   #636
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I am interested in this clone also. Hope someone will post a definitive clone going forward.

On a side note, I hope one day that I can become good enough to clone my favorite beers, but that day has not arrived yet.

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Old 01-19-2013, 12:49 PM   #637
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Hmmm, never thought of honey malt.
On my first attempt using it a few tries ago, I knew I wanted some sweetness and avoided everyone's cautioning not to overdo it. I went with a half pound. THAT was overdoing it. I still have a half keg of it in my basement because it was waaay too sweet. A little goes a long way. I've only tried the new attempt as a primary taste when it wasn't quite done fermenting, so I'll know more in a few days, but just enough (1.5-2%) I think got me there fine. For my batch it was just 3.25oz for a 6 gallon batch. Quite enough. It goes to secondary tomorrow.
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Old 01-19-2013, 01:07 PM   #638
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Someone with better eyes than me, John Kimmich tweeted out some more photos of the cannery yesterday. Let's all start zooming....

http://brewbokeh.com/place-alchemist.html

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Old 01-19-2013, 06:46 PM   #639
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Someone with better eyes than me, John Kimmich tweeted out some more photos of the cannery yesterday. Let's all start zooming....

http://brewbokeh.com/place-alchemist.html
Those are some beautiful shots. The photog has a lot of other breweries in his collection too and said he was planning to go back to the Alchemist after expansion was complete.

I found this entry from John a couple years back in his blog:

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The Heady Topper has kicked and I don’t know if it will be back before it is out in cans. Its next appearance might coincide with its debut. I played around with the malt bill a lot over the last three batches. For the most part, the drinkers knew nothing of these changes, but it was very interesting. I started these experiments because of the 2010/2011 barley crop coming out of England .

Last summers weather created problems with these barleys, mostly with haze forming properties. You may have noticed the increased haze in most of my beers. This problem becomes magnified when you brew a strong and highly hopped beer. There were three test batches. One of the batches was made with Maris Otter malt. I liked it well enough, but it lacked the crispness of the Pearl malt I usually use. The next batch was made with Great Western Pale Malt. This one I hated. It had hints of the “sweet” malt flavor that I find so prominent in a lot of interpretations of this style. The third batch was brewed with my usual base malt, Pearl , but I added an enzyme to the mash which breaks up beta-glucan. This beer had the best flavor, but the enzyme had no effect on the level of haze in the finished beer.

All of this playing around answered a very big question for me in this whole canning thing. What am I going to do about the level of haze in the Heady Topper when I put it in cans? Nothing. I will not change the flavor of one of my favorite beers just to conform to some idea that a beer should be clear. You put two IPA’s down in front of me, one is hazy, and one is crystal clear. I would instinctually go for the hazy beer. I have personally witnessed GREAT beers go to hell as soon as they started to filter their beer. It changes it so much, that I would rather people get some chunky sediment in their beer, than force them to drink a lifeless shadow of what it once was; a great beer.. The beer will be hazier than I would like until we get this summers crop, in late fall. So be it. I just fell in love with the British malt under all those American hops a long time ago.
Interesting to me because he has a few opportunities to mention other malts or use the plural form when talking about them, but only refers to one malt.
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Old 01-19-2013, 08:40 PM   #640
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Protease works to break up the larger proteins which enhances the head retention of beer and reduces haze. In fully modified malts, these enzymes have done their work during the malting process.

The temperature and pH ranges for these two proteolytic enzymes overlap. The optimum pH range is 4.2 - 5.3 and both enzymes are active enough between 113 - 131°F that talking about an optimum range for each is not relevant. This optimum pH range is a bit low with respect to most mashes, but the typical mash pH of 5.3 is not out of the ballpark. There is no need to attempt to lower the mash pH to facilitate the use of these enzymes. The typical Protein Rest at 120 - 130°F is used to break up proteins which might otherwise cause chill haze and can improve the head retention. This rest should only be used when using moderately-modified malts, or when using fully modified malts with a large proportion (>25%) of unmalted grain, e.g. flaked barley, wheat, rye, or oatmeal. Using this rest in a mash consisting mainly of fully modified malts would break up the proteins responsible for body and head retention and result in a thin, watery beer. The standard time for a protein rest is 20 - 30 minutes.

The other enzymes in this temperature regime are the beta-glucanases/cytases - part of the cellulose enzyme family, and are used to break up the beta glucans in (un)malted wheat, rye, oatmeal and unmalted barley. These glucan hemi-celluloses (i.e. brambles) are responsible for the gumminess of dough and if not broken down will cause the mash to turn into a solid loaf ready for baking. Fortunately, the optimum temperature range for the beta glucanase enzyme is below that for the proteolytics. This allows the brewer to rest the mash at 98 -113°F for 20 minutes to break down the gums without affecting the proteins responsible for head retention and body. The use of this rest is only necessary for brewers incorporating a large amount (>25%) of unmalted or flaked wheat, rye or oatmeal in the mash. Sticky mashes and lauters from lesser amounts can usually be handled by increasing the temperature at lautering time (Mashout). See Chapter 17 - "Getting the Wort Out - Lautering" for further
Seems odd Kimmich was so concerned about this when he started canning. The blog post came up when he was formulated the recipe for the first batch of cans.
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