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Old 01-11-2013, 10:14 PM   #51
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I'm talking American-style wheat beer. Yes there are some very fine American made German-style wheat beers out there. At the same time there are some that border on tasting like what you pour out of the bottom of the fermentor after racking (actually it has toned down in the past couple years - with respect to wheat based beers).
Yeah, I'm not sure which beers you are talking about here, because every American wheat I've had has used a clean yeast profile and characteristic American hops...usually cascade. Granted, I'm not a connoisseur of the style by any stretch, but my wife only really drinks wheat beers and the occasional Belgian, so I've had a decent number.

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I do appreciate big and/or weird beers, and approve wholeheartedly of experimentation (I am a scientist after all). My concern is that too many people with get it stuck in their heads that massive amounts of flavor must be present for the beer to be condisdered good. If they are not, then the beer is not good. We will have lost the ability to appreciate subtle and nuanced flavors.
I believe you make some salient points, in that I sort of have a problem with BeerAdvocate and other beer review sites for those reasons as they seem to be bastions of the extreme beer mentality...many outstanding beers are rated quite low, unfortunately, because a majority of the people doing the tasting haven't done any sensory training and thus only taste the things that stick out like a sore thumb, and they additionally develop this sort of herd mentality. How do I know this? I did a social experiment on there a while back where I posted a few reviews of beers and mentioned some aromas and flavors that ABSOLUTELY WERE NOT in the beers, then watched as other people read my reviews and said they tasted the same thing.

All that said, that doesn't mean the craft beer makers aren't making excellent, balanced beers, too. I think there's room enough for everyone.
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:22 PM   #52
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One major factor that prevents extreme beers from becoming the norm is simply sales volume. One brewer I know resisted making a session beer for years, but finally started making one. Much to his surprise, a cream ale didn't cost him any sales for the other beers he made, but the BMC sales in the pub dropped like a rock! He sells the cream ale for more than BMC, but less than his bigger beers. The profit margin is 2-3 times as high. He might be adding another fermenter or two and upgrading the rest of the system from 7 barrels to 15.


Really big beers are good for 2-3 sales per person a night, but a session ale can just keep flowing.

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Old 01-12-2013, 01:31 AM   #53
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I don't think you can extrapolate one example, or a handful of examples, to an entire generation.

I've had many fantastic extreme beers (lychee berliner weisse, beer made with whole pies, mixed seafood stout, grapefruit wood aged saison, american wild ale aged with oranges, etc), and I've had a lot of bad ones too.
It was a joke. I'm talking about Rauchbier, one of the older traditional beer styles still being made.
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Old 01-12-2013, 01:58 AM   #54
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Still waiting for a brewer to release a Wood aged sour Belgian influenced double pilsner triple IPA vanilla infused old whiskey barrel inspired double concocted farmhouse decoction barnyard imperial mild aged on peaches soaked in maple syrup that was hop infused with rye then triple fermented aged in old cider barrels soaked in Cabernet grapes from a coolship bottled in a limited edition run of bag labeled silk screened one of a kind glass formed at a farm in Flanders with brett infused sand.

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Old 01-12-2013, 02:43 AM   #55
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Still waiting for a brewer to release a Wood aged sour Belgian influenced double pilsner triple IPA vanilla infused old whiskey barrel inspired double concocted farmhouse decoction barnyard imperial mild aged on peaches soaked in maple syrup that was hop infused with rye then triple fermented aged in old cider barrels soaked in Cabernet grapes from a coolship bottled in a limited edition run of bag labeled silk screened one of a kind glass formed at a farm in Flanders with brett infused sand.
That was my next brew! How did you know?
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:00 AM   #56
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This thread reminds me of markets. Markets are driven by demand, not vice versa no matter what lord Keynes says! Extreme beers exist because there is a market for them. Additionally society, trends, and marketing approaches tend to cycle. Example: circa 1996 the hottest cpus on the market were bright any color you'd like i-macs and other manufacturers followed suit seeking market share. Today the mantra is slick and low profile, ie the opposite of flashy and colorful. Only a fool however thinks that 'have it in your color' won't return.

Inevitably as the 'buy local' trend continues to grow there will be a counter current that essentially says get it from elsewhere for a little excitement.

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Old 01-12-2013, 03:13 PM   #57
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This thread reminds me of markets. Markets are driven by demand, not vice versa no matter what lord Keynes says! Extreme beers exist because there is a market for them. Additionally society, trends, and marketing approaches tend to cycle. Example: circa 1996 the hottest cpus on the market were bright any color you'd like i-macs and other manufacturers followed suit seeking market share. Today the mantra is slick and low profile, ie the opposite of flashy and colorful. Only a fool however thinks that 'have it in your color' won't return.

Inevitably as the 'buy local' trend continues to grow there will be a counter current that essentially says get it from elsewhere for a little excitement.
I totally agree with your post, but I have to nitpick you on the fact that you're talking about computers, not CPUs. The CPU is a chip inside the computer, usually made by Intel or AMD (usually just Intel these days). Sorry, I'm a computer geek.
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