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Old 11-29-2012, 05:20 PM   #31
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do what fits your system and makes your life easier and go with it. After you've had a few of the fine brews you have created, you're not going to give a #$@% anyway.
this!!!!!
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:26 PM   #32
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But just because someone writes books, or magazine articles doesn't make him any more right or perfect on knowledgeable about subject than any one who doesn't.....it just maybe means they were more disciplined to actually sit down and write a book, and more persistent to patiently push it through the publication process.
This has been a problem in the education system, especially in higher education where a book written 20 to 50 years ago is used to teach. Some of the ideas in them are very good but some are very flawed but the books continue to be the "bible" of the professor (the professor may have been the one writing them even) and changes are extremely slow to come about.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:34 PM   #33
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Good list, but when I started brewing 20 yrs ago, some of those concepts weren't even invented yet. BIAB? Batch sparging? Mash pH? All unknown. LOL.

Back then, starters were uniformly 0.5L (2 cups). 3 or 4L would be unheard of. So "decanting a starter" wasn't even a question since they were so small! Oh, and you're brewing an ale? Add gypsum. LOL.

Our knowledge is still evolving and I look forward to where we'll be in another 10 yrs.

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Old 11-29-2012, 05:43 PM   #34
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Just a quick off topic... I saw the thread is rated and out of curiosity I clicked on the Rating thingy to see if it shows who rated it and it says "I've" already rated this thread yet there's only one vote... but I never rated this thread nor would I have rated my own thread cause that's lame. Any idea what's up?


Rev.

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Old 11-29-2012, 05:47 PM   #35
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Good list, but when I started brewing 20 yrs ago, some of those concepts weren't even invented yet. BIAB? Batch sparging? Mash pH? All unknown. LOL.
Wrong. Actually BIAB has been used in australia for over 20 years. The point was, we didn't know about it in the rest of the brewing world, until John Palmer wrote the article about it in BYO in '08." But it was a recognized form of ag brewing over there.

Same with batch sparging. People were batch sparging even long before fly sparging. Most of the early partigyle brewing was done just by dumping water in and draining it out.

And I do believe, but could be wrong, an understanding of mash ph is a few hundred years old as well. As long as they've understood what PH is, they've applied it to brew....It's just something relatively more recent to the HOBBY, once cheap PH strips and cheap meters became more readily available.

But the point is, all these things have become more common and more shared and understood in the last 20 years. But they existed.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:50 PM   #36
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I take issue with the highlighted portion, because what homebrewers do very much has an influence over the craft industry. BMC will always do as it has done but the craft industry is much quicker to pick up and run with new processes much faster (well some are at least) and many of these come from the homebrew world.
That's why I wrote the sentence that followed: "It's important as a tiny piece of the puzzle in the long run, but it won't radically change things in the brewing world from month to month."

You may come on here and post that you did that worked great, yet defied "conventional wisdom." Nobody's going to automatically take your experience as the new standard, but some people might try it and a month or two report back that they had a better experience using that method as well. Still, it will take years of trial and error before any small changes will have a big impact on the home brew community. That's why I said it's important, but the transmission of this data is nowhere near as quick as the news of a new CPU being released or a quarterback getting injured. That was my point- important, but a much slower to change industry.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:55 PM   #37
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It is awesome the amount of information (and products) available to new brewers on websites like this. Although people complain, jokingly, about "wasting" time mucking about on forums like this, I wasted a lot more time brewing with bad processes that resulted in wasted time and bad beer.

I started brewing in the early 1990s and all I had to learn from was "The Complete Guide to Homebrewing" and a little booth at a local mart that sold homebrewing equipment.

All the extract was from cans, and if I wanted to add hops I bought hopped extract. I didn't have an autosiphon or even a racking cane so transferring from one vessel to another was a major PITA. I only used bleach for sanitizing, which didn't always get rinsed off all the way. I seem to remember bottling right from the carboy when I first started because I had never heard of a bottling bucket. I also didn't have any kind of a faucet attachment for cleaning inside carboys or bottles. I topped off with city water right from the tap.

I'd say only one in three batches of beer didn't have some kind of off flavor. I quit doing it a couple times out of frustration.

New brewers today are lucky to have so many resources on hand. Sure, there are discrepancies and processes get revamped, but the knowledge base available at the touch of a button is insane.

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Old 11-29-2012, 06:02 PM   #38
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Great thread.

3 other topics:
Table sugar. Used to be blamed for cidery flavors. Now we know the culprit is bad kits/temp control, etc. Many of us use table sugar liberally w/out issue
Dry hop time. "Dry hopping too long = grassy flavors". The anecdotal evidence seems to be mixed on this one, and I've not seen anything conclusive. I've never experienced it, but others have so I don't want to discount their experience.
Sparge temp. Used to be blamed for efficiency issues. But it really doesn't matter; sparging cold even works.

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Old 11-29-2012, 06:09 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by Saxomophone View Post
It is awesome the amount of information (and products) available to new brewers on websites like this. Although people complain, jokingly, about "wasting" time mucking about on forums like this, I wasted a lot more time brewing with bad processes that resulted in wasted time and bad beer.

I started brewing in the early 1990s and all I had to learn from was "The Complete Guide to Homebrewing" and a little booth at a local mart that sold homebrewing equipment.

All the extract was from cans, and if I wanted to add hops I bought hopped extract. I didn't have an autosiphon or even a racking cane so transferring from one vessel to another was a major PITA. I only used bleach for sanitizing, which didn't always get rinsed off all the way. I seem to remember bottling right from the carboy when I first started because I had never heard of a bottling bucket. I also didn't have any kind of a faucet attachment for cleaning inside carboys or bottles. I topped off with city water right from the tap.

I'd say only one in three batches of beer didn't have some kind of off flavor. I quit doing it a couple times out of frustration.

New brewers today are lucky to have so many resources on hand. Sure, there are discrepancies and processes get revamped, but the knowledge base available at the touch of a button is insane.
It's so hard for a new brewer today like myself to imagine what home brewing was like back then. Even commercial brewing must have been so different, seeing as how there were only a small handful of breweries in the 1980s. Still, I'm envious of the learning that you guys had through trial and error, being in on the ground-floor of what is now a huge hobby and profession.
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Old 11-29-2012, 06:31 PM   #40
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It's so hard for a new brewer today like myself to imagine what home brewing was like back then. Even commercial brewing must have been so different, seeing as how there were only a small handful of breweries in the 1980s. Still, I'm envious of the learning that you guys had through trial and error, being in on the ground-floor of what is now a huge hobby and profession.
I had an uncle who brewed his own when I around 5 years old...would have been late 70's I guess. Sure wish he was still alive to pick his brain!

The only issue I have with most of these posts is the guys with 15 years of brewing experience are not the only ones making comments in most threads...Its easier for a new guy to read a book and trust that book, than to come on a site like this where any Tom Dick or Harry can post some lame comment and pass it off as fact. To me, the books and articles form a foundation, something you can at least partialy trust, even if it's not always fact and is later retracted.
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