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Old 12-04-2012, 01:58 PM   #181
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One big thing I learned over my limited brewing time that contradicted the standard brewing view was that you don't need to chill your wort to a pitchable temp as quickly as possible. From my initial readings and talking to home brew employees they stressed the importance of chilling and how important wort chillers were in the process. From what I've read people in Australia have been doing the no chill method for years so I gave it a shot on my last 4 batches and must say I cannot tell a difference in the outcome!
The only real difference is the time it takes to get the wort to a pitchable temperature. All things being equal there is no difference.
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:05 PM   #182
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The other main difference is that you increase your chances of wild yeast and/or bacteria infecting your wort before you pitch your desired yeast. This can be avoided with good sanitation practices and making sure your wort is covered and isolated correctly, but it is still an increased risk.

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Old 12-04-2012, 02:09 PM   #183
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Oh, and another difference would arise if you're trying to get the most out of your late addition hops. The longer that wort stays at the high temps, the more aromatics are being driven off from your late addition hops (and your earlier addition hops are adding slightly more bitterness). This can be compensated for, to a certain extent by dry-hopping and by calculating correctly for your earlier additions, but there certainly should be a difference between the two methods.

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Old 12-04-2012, 03:56 PM   #184
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Oh, and another difference would arise if you're trying to get the most out of your late addition hops. The longer that wort stays at the high temps, the more aromatics are being driven off from your late addition hops (and your earlier addition hops are adding slightly more bitterness). This can be compensated for, to a certain extent by dry-hopping and by calculating correctly for your earlier additions, but there certainly should be a difference between the two methods.
I do adjust my hops but have read a lot of people don't and swear it doesnt' make much if any of a difference. I am also reading about first wort hops and wanna give that a shot.

I sanatize my kegs, purge with c02, then store the wort in there for a few days to a week or so until ready to pitch. I've heard of people letting the wort sit for months before pitching a yeast.
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:39 PM   #185
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I do adjust my hops but have read a lot of people don't and swear it doesnt' make much if any of a difference. I am also reading about first wort hops and wanna give that a shot.
Again, you have to know how to judge these types of statements made on a message board. My guess is that when many (but not all) people on here say they "can't tell a difference" between two methods, they're not talking about side-by-side comparisons where they only changed one variable (i.e. brewing one beer, and doing split batch fermentation). They're really talking more generally about brewing the same beer different times and changing their process (i.e. chill vs. no-chill) and nothing jumping out at them when they taste the beer this time around versus last time. If they're tasting the current beer a month after they tasted the previous beer where the process was different and relying on memory to draw the conclusion that there's "no difference", then that's not a reliable comparison.

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I sanatize my kegs, purge with c02, then store the wort in there for a few days to a week or so until ready to pitch. I've heard of people letting the wort sit for months before pitching a yeast.
Why in god's name would you let the wort sit for months before pitching yeast? Unless you're doing a spontaneous fermentation, in which case hopefully something major should (hopefully) be happening within a few days. I guess I don't really see the difficulty in using a wort chiller (or some method of chilling wort within say at least a few hours). Its one of the least annoying things I can think of in the whole brewing process. But if it works for you, go for it.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:07 PM   #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moti_mo View Post
Again, you have to know how to judge these types of statements made on a message board. My guess is that when many (but not all) people on here say they "can't tell a difference" between two methods, they're not talking about side-by-side comparisons where they only changed one variable (i.e. brewing one beer, and doing split batch fermentation). They're really talking more generally about brewing the same beer different times and changing their process (i.e. chill vs. no-chill) and nothing jumping out at them when they taste the beer this time around versus last time. If they're tasting the current beer a month after they tasted the previous beer where the process was different and relying on memory to draw the conclusion that there's "no difference", then that's not a reliable comparison.
I'm sure that is a good bit of it...I"m not saying I buy it's exactly the same and that's why I do alter my hop schedule.

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Why in god's name would you let the wort sit for months before pitching yeast? Unless you're doing a spontaneous fermentation, in which case hopefully something major should (hopefully) be happening within a few days. I guess I don't really see the difficulty in using a wort chiller (or some method of chilling wort within say at least a few hours). Its one of the least annoying things I can think of in the whole brewing process. But if it works for you, go for it.
I think the point is people are saying the wort can stay good for months at a time if you use sanitary practices. I would guess/assume most people pitch within a few days when it has cooled. I do it for the sole reason that it saves me time/money brewing beer. I didn't have to buy a wort chiller or spend an hour+ chilling in my sink. I rack right from the brew pot to a keg and seal it up for a day or two. My main point was some think/thought chilling the wort right away is a must do...no chill is just another option for whatever reason you'd want to use it.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:15 PM   #187
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I do it for the sole reason that it saves me time/money brewing beer.
Does it really? I chill my wort down in average NY/NJ fall weather within 11-13 minutes. In the winter I chill it down in about 8 minutes. After that I can aerate, pitch my yeast, and off it goes. Are you somehow fermenting in the keg or are you just using it to hold the wort sealed? Because if it's just a holding vessle then it also has to be washed as well and so does the tubing you'd be using to transfer out of the keg to the fermenter. That doesn't sound like much if any time saved IMO.


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Old 12-04-2012, 05:28 PM   #188
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Does it really? I chill my wort down in average NY/NJ fall weather within 11-13 minutes. In the winter I chill it down in about 8 minutes. After that I can aerate, pitch my yeast, and off it goes. Are you somehow fermenting in the keg or are you just using it to hold the wort sealed? Because if it's just a holding vessle then it also has to be washed as well and so does the tubing you'd be using to transfer out of the keg to the fermenter. That doesn't sound like much if any time saved IMO.

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I don't have a wort chiller and after spending thousands on my last hobby(salt water reef tank) I'm trying to keep this one more reasonable I'm sure after I purchase all the other equipment I want and build a keezer etc etc I'll get a wort chiller at some point. When I brew 2.5g batches I cool in my kitchen sink with ice but even that takes an hour+ to chill.

I use the keg as a holding vessel and it probably doens't take much longer to wash/sanatize than a wort chiller?
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:33 PM   #189
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If you get a "keezer" (Gawd, I hate that word) before you get a wort chiiler, you need to re-examine your priorities IMO. A chiller will very likely improve the quality of your beer. Isn't that more important?

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Old 12-04-2012, 05:34 PM   #190
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Lets not forget that if you are transferring into a glass carboy, chilling down is a must! Learned that the hard way w/ our first batch - thought I could 'trickle' the wort into the carboy w/o problems, only to hear a sickening 'crack' after about a gallon had transferred. So - there are valid reasons to chill, depending on processes. We now use a 25' coil in an icewater bath as a pre-chiller, and then a 50 ft coil in the boil pot, and we get our wort down to pitching temps in about 10 minutes, give or take a bit.

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