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Old 11-30-2012, 04:48 PM   #111
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I take my time with my all grain beers, but sometimes I just want to cook up something real quick, so I get a kit and do brew on the stove...
I generally do BIAB, but have got some of the one gallon extract kits to fill in...also being less expensive than a full 5 gallon batch, I get to try several different beers for the same money.
If I find something I really like, I'll get a 5 gallon all grain kit.

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Old 11-30-2012, 05:23 PM   #112
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As someone who first got into this hobby more than 30 years ago, I find it interesting to see how some things have changed. I have to admit it's hard to let go of some of the things I "know" --for example, that glass carboys are better than plastic buckets, and the importance of racking into secondary to get the beer off of the yeast.

On the one hand, it's easy to think "What I'm doing has always worked, why change?" On the other hand, I consider that when I first started brewing, I did the best I could with the information available to me at the time. Now I have more information, and newer information, and I still want to do the best I can with what information is available to me.

I figure it's possible to achieve some sort of balance. There's something to be said for holding onto older methods that work well, but there's always something new to be learned, and new things to be tried.

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Old 11-30-2012, 05:29 PM   #113
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Regarding the 60 vs 90 vs 120 minute boils, at the beginning of the Sunday Session podcast (I'm still working on the first year of the show from back in 2005) they would constantly talk about 90 minute boils in regards to providing clearer beer. I think that Jamil might have even mentioned it as well. I decided to try it out starting a few batches back; I'm just starting to crack the first batch open (which were made without a whirlfloc tablet) and they're a lot clearer than my old brews. *shrug*

This hobby is all about n=1 experiments, and that's what makes it great. That's true for the nanobreweries as well. Even at the microbrewery and macrobrewery levels they have their own methods to make their beer, well, their beer; the only difference is that they need to be consistant because of their brand names. That's really the general difference between us and them when it comes to methodology.

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Old 11-30-2012, 06:04 PM   #114
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Originally Posted by metanoia View Post
Regarding the 60 vs 90 vs 120 minute boils, at the beginning of the Sunday Session podcast (I'm still working on the first year of the show from back in 2005) they would constantly talk about 90 minute boils in regards to providing clearer beer. I think that Jamil might have even mentioned it as well. I decided to try it out starting a few batches back; I'm just starting to crack the first batch open (which were made without a whirlfloc tablet) and they're a lot clearer than my old brews. *shrug*
Thats because longer boils promote better coagulation, better coagulations leads to a better breaks in your beer...therefore clearer beer. There is some German brewery out there that talks about the benefits of longer boils...I found it through google one day

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I'm trying to shorten my brew day..not make it longer!
I am shortening my brew week with this method. Everything is done in 5-6 hours. Now I'm not spending another 20 minutes on another day dry hopping and then an hour on another day bottling. Everything is done in one day with longer boils. Longer day...shorter week (if that makes sense)

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Is this for your "normal" beers? You know your typical Ipa's, Pales, whatevers, basic every day beers? Like I said earlier I've only ever done it for huge beers- gone longer than 90.

So obviously your pre-boil volumes are adjusted to accommodate this, right?

Interesting, something new to play with. I missed this in Radical Brewing.

I do this for all beers...My mash is 1.45 quarts per pound...then I just upped it on the sparge but you could easily do two sparges or a larger mash. I like the thinner mashes as I have never even seen a dough ball.

Randy talks about it pretty early in the book, I think when he talks about decoctions. I'll try to look it up but its there.
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Old 11-30-2012, 06:14 PM   #115
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Originally Posted by chicken View Post
As someone who first got into this hobby more than 30 years ago, I find it interesting to see how some things have changed. I have to admit it's hard to let go of some of the things I "know" --for example, that glass carboys are better than plastic buckets, and the importance of racking into secondary to get the beer off of the yeast.

On the one hand, it's easy to think "What I'm doing has always worked, why change?" On the other hand, I consider that when I first started brewing, I did the best I could with the information available to me at the time. Now I have more information, and newer information, and I still want to do the best I can with what information is available to me.

I figure it's possible to achieve some sort of balance. There's something to be said for holding onto older methods that work well, but there's always something new to be learned, and new things to be tried.
+1

You said it better than I could.

Also thanks to all of you on HBT, you have helped me to make better beer than I could have on my own.
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:10 PM   #116
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I do this for all beers...My mash is 1.45 quarts per pound...then I just upped it on the sparge but you could easily do two sparges or a larger mash. I like the thinner mashes as I have never even seen a dough ball.
I was gonna say, that the efficiency is generally better when one plans for a 2 hour boil instead of a 60-90min boil alone generally makes it far superior in my mind. Larger sparge, fewer dough balls, etc. +1 in general on 2 hours over 1 hour on the boil; definitely worth the extra time.

I still can't stress enough that with the increased caramels and melanoidins (malliard reactions) time isn't the sole factor though. Two hours with a tame boil isn't going to contribute much change to the wort; you really need to crank up the heat and keep the boil rolling to get any appreciable difference.
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:15 PM   #117
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perhaps things were done the way they were 100 years ago, because they didn't have the knowledge, testing or equipment that we have now?
I mean things have changed a lot...even in just the last 30 years.

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Old 11-30-2012, 08:03 PM   #118
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perhaps things were done the way they were 100 years ago, because they didn't have the knowledge, testing or equipment that we have now?
I mean things have changed a lot...even in just the last 30 years.
I think you have to be careful here...when I was born they did everything to convince parents to feed their infants formula...because it was better for the infant...Now they are on the complete oposite end of the spectrum, going so far as to try to force hospitals to no longer keep formula on hand for new parents. Now...if it's 2012, you'd say, see, they've figured it out...if it's 1970, you were screwed by believing in their current "knowledge, testing and equipment".

My point is there is always some "new" way, sometimes good and sometimes bad. BIAB seems to be the newest, easiest, fastest way to AG brew. Awesome, good for folks who brew with this method, it may well be gods gift to home brewers. But certainly the brewers who continue to brew AG without BIAB should not be looked at as "blindly hanging on to old information" or refusing to keep up with the times. This is an example, but applys to the way a lot of people discuss the use of secondaries, decoctions etc.
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:24 PM   #119
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I"ll try anything once, just so I can figure out for myself if it works for me...I usually do BIAB, but have the cooler setup for a mash tun...I've done no chill, yeast starters, harvesting yeast etc...I just like the methods that I use because they are easy for me...I'm never opposed to trying something different if it's feasible for me.

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Old 11-30-2012, 08:42 PM   #120
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Is BIAB really easier? I get that the grains are all trapped in the bag making it easier to dump, etc. It just doesn't look right for some reason. I know it's whatever works for the individual, I was just looking for some first hand feedback on BIAB. I don't know anybody that does it. I do the picnic cooler, but as soon as my GD parts come in, it's RIMS city.

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