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Old 02-05-2011, 08:59 PM   #1
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Default Erlenmeyer flask on induction cooktop

I'd like to use my Erlenmeyer flask on my induction cooktop but the induction cooktop will only work with magnetic metals.

I've contemplated using a cast iron skillet and putting the flask on that, but I'm scared that the extremely hot cast iron skillet will end up breaking the glass. I know the flask is "heat proof" but that's only gotta be to a certain degree.

Any ideas?

NAte



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Old 02-05-2011, 09:05 PM   #2
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You'll be fine. Flasks are made to be used directly on top of bunsen burners and your skillet won't get that hot. Adding a little water to the pan will help spread the heat out even more and avoid getting any hot spots that could lead to damaging the flask. I would also recommend not turning the stove all the way up for the same reason, use a moderate heat setting, just enough to get it up to a boil.



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Old 02-05-2011, 10:01 PM   #3
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Put it in a sauce pan with some water in it and bring the whole thing up to temperature together, essentially making a double boiler...

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Old 02-05-2011, 10:46 PM   #4
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Erlenmeyers are made of borosilicate glass and extremely resistant to temperature change. My concern would be how you are planning on distributing the heat throughout the flask -- stir bar?

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Old 02-05-2011, 11:22 PM   #5
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None of these posts address the real issue that causes flasks to fail on the burner... super-heated hot-spots (due to lack of surface area in contact with the flask). This is precisely the reason they are apt to break on electric burners and placing sitting on an intermediate metal is likely to cause the exact same issue unless you ensure that the surface area is sufficient and/or the heating is uniform and moderate enough to prevent extreme hot-spotting. A heavy duty cast iron pan may be enough, but I would certainly not presume any metal or conductor between them is enough on its own.

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Old 02-06-2011, 12:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randar View Post
None of these posts address the real issue
Issue was addressed. You'll have to put in frypan with water. As stated above.

BTW, I wish I had an induction cooktop. Very cool. Have you seen the "zoneless" induction cooktops?
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:01 AM   #7
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I'm wondering why you'd try to put an Erlenmeyer flask on the cooktop to begin with If this is to make your starter wort, I think it's best to start with a regular pot....so that you can adequately stir the malt extract to dissolve everything. Since the flask can stand high temp differentials, you can still use a funnel to direct that wort into the flask....and it still shall be sanitary. You can then chill the wort in the flask however you see fit (whether putting it in the freezer or an icebath).

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Old 02-06-2011, 02:08 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davesrose View Post
I'm wondering why you'd try to put an Erlenmeyer flask on the cooktop to begin with .
Simplicity. It is very east to just boil in the flask, chill, pitch some yeast, cover with foil and throw on the stir plate.

I'll try throwing it in a large pot that also has water in it and give that a shot. The more I think about this I think it might be ok with a cast iron pan for the flask, but heating that empty cast iron pan for such a long time might be bad for the induction top.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:17 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnatp2 View Post
Simplicity. It is very east to just boil in the flask, chill, pitch some yeast, cover with foil and throw on the stir plate.
I've been making my starter worts with pots, then transfering to whatever vessels, for quite a while now. Believe me, especially if we're talking hot wort here, it's not inconvenient at all.....especially when you compare what you have to do with an actual brew. The only difference is that you have to rinse the pot once you're done with it...that's only 10 seconds more and less then a penny of extra water.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:31 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
Issue was addressed. You'll have to put in frypan with water. As stated above.

BTW, I wish I had an induction cooktop. Very cool. Have you seen the "zoneless" induction cooktops?
Yes, I have seen them. very cool. I love mine. So easy to clean up. My only beef was having to buy all new cookware. But overall it is awesome (besides this flask issue!)


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