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Old 03-08-2012, 09:35 PM   #1
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Default Does anyone know why?

Does anyone know why if you put in a recipe on lets say hopsville beer calculator and then put the same recipe into beersmith, why do they come out different?
On hopsville
OG - 1.047
SRM - 43
IBU - 40.8
ABV - 4.5%

On Beersmith
OG - 1.046
SRM - 38
IBU - 36
also on Beersmith it states that my Est. ABV will be at 4.3% where I want it. Then it states Measured ABV 4.7% that's if I keep my into the fermentor Measured OG at 1.046!? I do not get it...
Anyone got any thoughts?

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Old 03-08-2012, 09:43 PM   #2
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Each recipe program uses different formulas to get their solutions. Also, each program uses a different defined value for each item. So the numbers will be slightly different depending what you use. They are close enough that you likely will not taste any difference so it's kind of splitting hairs to worry about it.

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Old 03-08-2012, 10:57 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMan
Each recipe program uses different formulas to get their solutions. Also, each program uses a different defined value for each item. So the numbers will be slightly different depending what you use. They are close enough that you likely will not taste any difference so it's kind of splitting hairs to worry about it.
Yea I guess I was just more concerned about beersmith's Est. ABV which comes out to be 4.3% and Measured ABV on the into fermentation page which comes out to be 4.7%...just wondering why it kicks it up even after boil OG is the same...
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Old 03-08-2012, 11:20 PM   #4
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The measured ABV is based off of the numbers you enter.

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Old 03-08-2012, 11:33 PM   #5
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Things like SRM depend on the lovibond given to a certain grain in beersmith. You can double click on the grain and change it to match whatever you ordered or picked up at your LHBS. For instance, i think the default for german pils is 2 L on beersmith but I always change it to 1.7 L to match the german pils I use. I imagine hopville has something similar. Make sure you have all the correct stats entered into each program. There are others you can change like diastatic power etc.

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Old 03-09-2012, 08:16 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockfish42
The measured ABV is based off of the numbers you enter.
You have to enter OG and FG for Beersmith to calculate the actual ABV.
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Old 03-09-2012, 12:58 PM   #7
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There are a lot of variables to check such as the yeast attenuation and sparge temperatures in Beersmith... this will affect the estimated final gravity and as a result the est. ABV.

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Old 03-09-2012, 03:40 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by BillyBock View Post
You have to enter OG and FG for Beersmith to calculate the actual ABV.
That's what I said :P
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Old 03-09-2012, 03:43 PM   #9
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This comes up alot, when folks compare programs head to head.

A couple of the biggest issues that cause consternation to folks, especially if they compare programs, or if they take for example a recipe from byo or someplace and input it, and find differences have to do with batch size settings and which IBU formula the software is defaulting to.

The final volume of a lot of Palmer and Jamil's recipes, and some of them in magazines are usually 5.5 or 6 gallons whereas most of the time we write recipes for the standard 5 gallon recipes. That often accounts for differences between what we might input in software. Make sure the final volume is matching.

The other thing is, that there's several different calculations used to figure out IBU. And they give different numbers. Somewhere in either a book or on the software it should tell you what the default setting is, and even give you the option to change it to match. But often they don't make it obvious.

Here's an explanation of how Beercalculus calculates it from their Hopville Blog for example;

Quote:
Previously, the default IBU calculation for Beer Calculus was based on an average of a few popular formulas. It did four calculations (Garetz, Rager, Tinseth, and the legacy Hopville calc) and averaged them together. I chose to blend a few conflicting numbers together instead of committing to a single one by default. That neutral position tended to cause some confusion among both types of brewers: those who cared which formula was in use, but didn’t know you could change it, and those who didn’t care at all. Plus, the only indication that a formula selection was being made was a subtle message “avg” near the IBU result – pretty vague about what was happening behind the scenes. Recipes now default to the Tinseth formula. Hopefully this will satisfy those who prefer this formula, and also clarify the default calculation to folks who don’t really care.
IIRC beercalculus is defalted to tinseth (maybe). So comparing the two in terms of IBUS is going to show up differently.

One of the most recent thread discussing this is here. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f84/diff...ftware-218066/

The other thing has to do with the efficience a given recipe was created with and the efficiency setting in the particular software. 75% is usually the default in the software, but a lot of folks, especially people who have their systems dialed in may have a higher or lower efficiency setting in their native software, so the anticipated og and fg may be different.

None of these are the software, or mean that one software is better than the other. Often it's the user's own settings that are off.

But in terms of accuracy, they're all accurate, you might think of it simply being that they're in different languages....as long as you stay consistant in using one over any other it will be right.

But in reality it's all arbitrary anyway...they're just numbers. I think a better analogy than what I posted above would be instead of languages think about Fahrenheit vs Celcius or Brix vs specific gravity, they're valid and accurate scales. Just present the same "data" differently.
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Old 03-09-2012, 03:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spenghali View Post
Things like SRM depend on the lovibond given to a certain grain in beersmith. You can double click on the grain and change it to match whatever you ordered or picked up at your LHBS. For instance, i think the default for german pils is 2 L on beersmith but I always change it to 1.7 L to match the german pils I use. I imagine hopville has something similar. Make sure you have all the correct stats entered into each program. There are others you can change like diastatic power etc.
Yep. This is why the colors don't match. I always insert my actual Lovibond from the grain I'm using and my beer color comes out spot on what I expected.
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