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Old 03-25-2012, 03:39 PM   #11
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This is very cool. Being a student of pharmacy diabetes is a very important disease to me. I think your ideas are great. Alcohol is not metabolized to sugar in any way and therefore does not affect blood glucose levels. Should anyone want to attempt something similar, the amylase enzyme you use is present in the mash and is the process you're promoting by doing a mash. So if you mashed long and low uou would get similar results as using the enzyme, although adding enzyme with speed up the process.

The biggest hurdle would be finding slowly metabolized sugars to replace sugars are fermented out, and it sounds like you've done it. Awesome job. If its good it's good and it sounds like this is a great way to allow your wife a few beers. Very cool

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Old 03-25-2012, 07:51 PM   #12
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Thank you for sharing this!

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Old 03-26-2012, 03:38 AM   #13
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This is pretty cool. Thanks for sharing.

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Old 03-26-2012, 07:35 AM   #14
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Suppose I'll throw my 2 centavos in:

I've been a Type 1 since I was 5 (now 30), and for the last 20 years, I've been on an insulin pump. I shared the same concerns over BG levels that you and your wife do when I initially became interested in this whole "non-Budweiser beer" world, but over time, I've realized that it doesn't play much of, if any, role in how my BG levels are affected.

Granted, the insulin pump probably plays a role somewhere in this equation, but as far as I know, good control and general knowledge about what you eat/drink translates into more flexibility in what you can consume. I've noticed that lower gravity stuff tends to have less of an effect, whereas higher percentages have a greater impact (but again, the insulin pump helps out there), so I'm taking an educated guess in saying that higher gravity (which, in essence, means higher starch & sugar content) mean a larger spike in BG readings.

I haven't looked myself, but the nutritional value for most commercial & craft brews must be available somewhere online. It would take a bit of planning, but as long as your wife is able to cover for what she drinks (i.e. less food or increasing her meds slightly), you might be able to find a happy middle ground.

I've also read quite a bit about Type 2's using insulin pumps at very low levels to compensate for what their bodies produce, so that might be another avenue to check out. PM me for more info about pumps if you want to! Trying not to toot my own horn, but I've basically spent most of my life witnessing the "evolution" of insulin pumps over the last 20 years, so I'm pretty well-versed in all thing pump related.

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Old 03-26-2012, 09:31 AM   #15
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Well, FWIW the wife is NOT on insulin and is supposed to only take 1 pill of metformin a day. I do not think she has even been taking the pill for a few weeks now, I will ask her in the AM. We are doing well by controlling this without meds IMO. We are both dropping weight at a slow, steady and safe rate.

We did see a commercial beer chart and even Bud (which we both now strongly dislike) has to much residual maltose in it. I also understand that beer affects people differently (in relation to diabetics)

I also agree that paying very close attention to food intake has a direct impact on BG levels.

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Old 06-04-2012, 10:21 PM   #16
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I am a third year Medical student. My advice is to get her into/find saison or sour styles that she would like. Adding lactose to a alpha amylase beer is counter productive.

On the other hand, any beer finishing under 1.005 would be great. Also you can get fruit flavors in there with almost no residual sugar.

Just remember: dry, dry, dry. Low FG.

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:01 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KCBrew View Post
My advice is to get her into/find saison or sour styles that she would like.
That's exactly what I was going to say... Super dry saison style beers should have very little residual sugar to affect your blood glucose. Not to mention they're amazing!

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Lactose in studies does not seem to raise blood sugar levels.
Are you sure about this? My daughter has been a type 1 since she was 7 months old (very rare to show up that early). I remember from the day she was diagnosed the only way we could control her blood sugar was giving insulin to get it down (obviously) or milk to raise it if it was too low. I'm fairly sure the only sugar in milk is lactose, and this definitely raised her blood sugar quite reliably. Not as quickly as simpler sugars but that's mostly due to the higher fat and protein content of milk, which slows down absorption of sugars.

Was your first results to the irish stout with the lactose added? And it didn't raise blood sugar noticeably?
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Old 06-05-2012, 05:37 AM   #18
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Here's a chart that gives a good 'general' idea of the carb content of various beers. Note that a large share of them have as low as 2 grams, up to the Guinness packing 17 grams.

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art14302.asp

This site lists some of the higher carb beers, a good share of these are around 14-16 grams per serving, and for any of us counting carbs and/or using an 'exchange' program, these beers carry as much sugar content as, say, a piece of fruit or slice of bread = increased glucose readings. Boo!

http://www.battlediabetes.com/beer-and-diabetes

And of course depending on the individual the effect of just a few carbs from a serving may or may not drastically increase the blood glucose... myself am Type 1 with an insulin pump (going on 34 years). Never had much change in glucose readings with one serving of lower-carb beer, but more than one does require some insulin to cover. All that said I am certainly intrigued by these experiments

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Old 06-05-2012, 11:58 AM   #19
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Sorry, I have not responded sooner, I have been busy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KCBrew View Post
I am a third year Medical student. My advice is to get her into/find saison or sour styles that she would like. Adding lactose to a alpha amylase beer is counter productive.
The AE is denatured in the boil. Lactose is added after the fact. It works just fine...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessRockwell View Post
That's exactly what I was going to say... Super dry saison style beers should have very little residual sugar to affect your blood glucose. Not to mention they're amazing!
We have a: french saison, IPA, Pear Kolsh and some of the Irish stout left. So the style range can be huge. The main thing IMO is that the final beer be around 5% ABV or less.

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Are you sure about this? Was your first results to the irish stout with the lactose added? And it didn't raise blood sugar noticeably?
I have read medical studies that lactose did not raise blood sugar levels is normal people, healthy diabetics and it SELDOM raised the sugar in obese diabetics. If you go back to my OP I had a HUGE disclaimer that basically read: I am not a medical anything and YMMV. What worked for my wife may not work the same in everyone.

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All that said I am certainly intrigued by these experiments
Thanks for the charts. The wife and I do not drink daily we are binge drinkers as is the case with 90% of Wisconsinites. She will probably never have just one. The other side is my wife is VERY picky when it comes to beers. She has recently had a lupilin shift and is enjoying IPAs.

And now for the update on the wife. Her diet and exercise plan has been working! She has been of the meds for over a month now. Lost 28 pounds since we found out and her A1C is back in normal range. Please note this is with a NO sugar diet and she needs to continue down this path or everything will be undone.

Since we both have the same diet, I am also down 2 pant sizes...

I also made Yoopers Kahlua recipe with decaf coffee and Splenda. Now the wife can have shots / chicky coffee drinks when she wants one!

Anyone attempting this please remember YMMV, test in small portions first. I wish you all the best of health and luck.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:08 AM   #20
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My homebrew shop has alpha amalyese enzyme and endo amalyese enzyme... what's the difference??? Which one should I get?

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