Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Characteristics of wild bacteria/yeast

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-06-2008, 12:57 PM   #1
bdigi66
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 19
Default Characteristics of wild bacteria/yeast

I'm curious as to the different characteristics in both smell and taste of brett, lactobacillus and pediococcus bacterias...sorry if my spelling is off. I'm most familiar with brett but would like as much info as possible.

Another thing I've noticed discussed is the difference in vinegar-like aromas/tastes in lambics compared to a "lactic" type of sourness and was curious as to the type of sourness that lacto imposes which differentiates itself from a vinegar type of sourness.

Any help would be much appreciated.

__________________
bdigi66 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2008, 01:18 PM   #2
PseudoChef
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
PseudoChef's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: West Chicago 'Burbs, IL
Posts: 3,418
Liked 102 Times on 75 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Well, first things first: Brettanomyces is actually a yeast, meaning that it takes sugar (6-carbon ring) and converts it to alcohol (ethanol, a 2-carbon product) and Carbon Dioxide. There are something like 12 strains of Brett that have been classified, but only 4 are used for beer/wine fermentation: B. claussenii, B. bruxellensis, B. lambicus, and B. anomalous.

Clausenii is the most mild of the Bretts, along with anomalous. It gives a mild pineapple/horsey flavor to a finished product, when used in secondary fermentation.

Bruxellensis is the Brett that Orval adds in secondary/bottling to give it its trademark flavor. I find this to be the most barnyard/funky in that sense of the strains.

With Lambicus, I find that it is the only one to produce a lactic type flavor, even though it is not a bacteria - it is giving me high levels of cherry-like flavors when used in secondary (I have two B. lambicus beers going right now.

When talking about lactic sourness, that comes from both the lactobacillus and pediococcus bacteria. They take sugars (lactose) and convert them to lactic acid. Common types of this is yogurt and buttermilk which have had some of their sugars converted to lactic acid, giving them their trademark "twang."

The vinegar taste comes from acetic acid. All household white vinegar is is a 5% solution of acetic acid. This comes from acetobacter, which isn't directly innoculated into the beer from cultures, but arises out of oxidation of the product. Sometimes this is desirable (such a a Flanders Red) and sometimes it isn't.

This is the basics of it all - but I would suggest you pick up Wild Brews by Jeff Sparrow if you want the detailed information.

__________________

Last edited by PseudoChef; 11-06-2008 at 01:21 PM.
PseudoChef is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2008, 01:36 PM   #3
bdigi66
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 19
Default

Awesome...thanks for the info. Definitely going to pick up the Wild Brews book.

__________________
bdigi66 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yeast Bank- Wild Yeast/bacteria Jsta Porter Lambic & Wild Brewing 7 04-21-2009 01:20 PM
Yeast type characteristics? NewBrew75 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 01-20-2009 05:51 AM
Bacteria/Wild Yeast Infection? tbone Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 12-24-2007 07:08 PM
Yeast Characteristics Saintdanmic Recipes/Ingredients 6 08-22-2007 06:14 PM
Eliminate germs, bacteria, wild yeast WITH LIGHT?! RoaringBrewer Equipment/Sanitation 8 11-11-2006 04:11 PM