Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   General Beer Discussion (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/)
-   -   Canning Homebrew? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/canning-homebrew-333506/)

SouthBay 06-06-2012 02:16 AM

Canning Homebrew?
 
So, i havent googled this, so bear with me...

Today, i saw a thing on a local cable news channel about a business owner that started a business with a portable canning trailer he takes to local breweries. Its been a big success here in the Pac NW, because theres like a bajillion craft breweries. They like the lower carbon footprint, ease of recycling, portability of the brews (hiking, camping, river floating, kayaking, etc, are all pretty big up here), all contribute to why the breweries and consumers like it.

It got me thinking: if you could can your homebrew, instead of bottling or keggin, would you? Why/why not?

jerryteague 06-06-2012 02:21 AM

I keg mine mostly, but of I could I'd put what I dont keg in cans. Carbon footprint (if there is such a thing) has nothing to do with it. I believe beer in cans keeps better, than bottled beer.

grndslm 06-06-2012 02:41 AM

Srsly??

I've gotten the idea to bottle in mason jars from this site once or twice. I'm wondering why it's not MORE common if there's no need for a capper and a "limitless" replacement caps.

Mason jars come in 8, 16, 32, 64 oz jars. Twelve jars for $10 or less???

Oh yea... they're not brown, tho. So leave 'em in box inside two bags, in a closet, in the basement. Then it's all good!!!

Phunhog 06-06-2012 02:42 AM

Absolutely! I would then buy an old soda machine and stock it with canned homebrew. But....it will never happen.

emjay 06-06-2012 02:44 AM

Canned homebrew would be awesome

Quote:

Originally Posted by grndslm
Srsly??

I've gotten the idea to bottle in mason jars from this site once or twice. I'm wondering why it's not MORE common if there's no need for a capper and a "limitless" replacement caps.

Mason jars come in 8, 16, 32, 64 oz jars. Twelve jars for $10 or less???

Oh yea... they're not brown, tho. So leave 'em in box inside two bags, in a closet, in the basement. Then it's all good!!!

Even if you could carbonate them (canning with heat would kill the yeast), mason jars would explode pretty easily.

Bamsdealer 06-06-2012 02:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by emjay (Post 4147384)
Canned homebrew would be awesome



Even if you could carbonate them (canning with heat would kill the yeast), mason jars would explode pretty easily.

I wonder about that. I mean, they're made to withstand heat which I'm sure creates a good bit of pressure...

I've never canned, so I don't really know the process

emjay 06-06-2012 04:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bamsdealer

I wonder about that. I mean, they're made to withstand heat which I'm sure creates a good bit of pressure...

I've never canned, so I don't really know the process

The pressure created by heating (typical) stuff in a mason jar is only a fraction of what would be created by carbonated beer, particularly "bottle"-conditioned beer. You could probably get away with filling it from a keg though, as with growlers. But at that point I'd just prefer to use growlers.

Also, I've never canned anything myself, but I don't think the process even creates any significant added pressure from the heat. I'm fairly sure it works because air is able to escape while heated, as that pretty much HAS to happen in order for there to be a bit of a vacuum in the jars once cooled. This vacuum is what allows it to seal and sucks the center of the lid inwards (the safety thing). If anything, it would seem mason jars need to be made to withstand a pressure differential where the higher pressure is on the *outside* (implosion), especially for pressure-canning, but they shouldn't be nearly as resistant to explosions.

grndslm 06-06-2012 04:27 AM

My 95-yr old grandfather who recently passed away told me how HIS mother bought yeast, grains, etc. and they would all make it.

I could have sworn that she just put it in mason jars, but I don't really have the ability to ask him that. Wasn't into homebrewing until my friend had all the equipment and basics down for me to perfect.

I think that it'd be possible to find some mason jars that wouldn't explode, tho. Not a real fan of clear bottles, but I'm pretty sure I could make it work somehow. Put a tad more headspace or a tad less priming sugar?? There's gotta be away if you know your process.

emjay 06-06-2012 04:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by grndslm
My 95-yr old grandfather who recently passed away told me how HIS mother bought yeast, grains, etc. and they would all make it.

I could have sworn that she just put it in mason jars, but I don't really have the ability to ask him that. Wasn't into homebrewing until my friend had all the equipment and basics down for me to perfect.

I think that it'd be possible to find some mason jars that wouldn't explode, tho. Not a real fan of clear bottles, but I'm pretty sure I could make it work somehow. Put a tad more headspace or a tad less priming sugar?? There's gotta be away if you know your process.

You'd have to bulk carbonate it. Either that, or drink it nearly flat. I suppose they technically COULD make special "jars" that could withstand the pressure from bottle-conditioning, but they wouldn't even look like regular mason jars, unless they used ridiculously thick glass.

Either way, you'd be paying a heck of a premium on them and they wouldn't be cheaper than using standard beer bottles, as it'd both be smaller-scale manufacturing and require more glass per vessel. And because of that, I don't see why there would be much of a demand for such a product, making it all the more expensive to actually produce. Which kind of sucks now that I think about it, as I think it'd be fun to "bottle" a Kentucky common or even a CAP.

lgilmore 06-06-2012 04:47 AM

To the guy who wants to use mason jars, go for it. I would never myself because I both brew and process pickled stuff and the principals are different with each. But hey, knock yourself out.

The mobile canning company is a startup by some of my son's college buddies. Lots of advantages for a small batch brewery to can their products to market. I think it's a great idea and if or when I get bigger at this, I would do it too. the can 'art" is pretty good with the product they've canned so far.


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:08 PM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.