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Old 09-26-2009, 02:14 PM   #1
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Default Can anyone verify this? using adjunt led to 'ice cold' serving?

Hi folks,

I was talking about having beer at room temperature (15-18C) and how I hated having beer ice cold with buddies.

Then one of the guys told me it all began when BMCs started putting mass quantities of adjuncts in their beer to mask its true flavour.


Is this true?

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Old 09-26-2009, 02:38 PM   #2
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Big beer has been using adjuncts from day one because American barley was too protein rich. Despite popular belief rice and corn were not used to cheapen beer, they were actually more expensive at the time they started using them. The truth of the matter is that the majority of people prefer that kind of beer and there is no gobal conspiracy of corporations trying to dull our tastes...they are simply selling people what they want. So no, it was not started at the time of adjunct use, most people just like their beer cold.

Go read this book:
Ambitious Brew: The Story of American Beer
Then tell your friends to stop spreading misinformation about.

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Old 09-26-2009, 03:03 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Tonedef131 View Post
Big beer has been using adjuncts from day one because American barley was too protein rich. Despite popular belief rice and corn were not used to cheapen beer, they were actually more expensive at the time they started using them. The truth of the matter is that the majority of people prefer that kind of beer and there is no gobal conspiracy of corporations trying to dull our tastes...they are simply selling people what they want. So no, it was not started at the time of adjunct use, most people just like their beer cold.
Tonedef hit the nail on the head......
America like most of the world had quite an extensive array of beers available prior to the German Invasion of brewer's which later introduced the light lager. They pretty much had the "brewing culture" of all the countries that people immigrated from...Most English beer styles..you know Porters, Stouts, Partigyles, stuff like that. As well as mostly heavy German Styles of beer. Not to mention people from Scotland, Ireland, Russia and other places where beer was drank.

Remember up until then, beer was food.

In fact thew whole history of the light lager is the American populace's (not the brewer's) desire to have a lighter beer to drink, which forced the German brewers to look at adding adjuncts like corn and rice...not as the popular homebrewer's myth has been to make money by peddling and "inferior commercial product" by adding adjuncts, but in order to come up with a style of beer that the American people wanted.

Maureen Ogle proved that in Ambitious Brew it actually made the cost of a bottle of Budweiser cost around 17.00/bottle in today's dollars.

When AH released Budweiser with it's corn and rice adjuncts in the 1860's it was the most expensive beer out there; a single bottle retailed for $1.00 (what would equal in today's Dollars for $17.00) this was quite difference when a schooner of beer usually cost a nickel.

The American populace ate it up!

It wasn't done to save money, it was done because heavy beers (both english style Ales and the heavier Bavarian malty beers) were not being drunk by American consumers any more. Beer initally was seen around the world as food (some even called it liquid bread), but since America, even in the 1800's was a prosperous nation compared to the rest of the world, and americans ate meat with nearly every meal, heavy beers had fallen out of favor...

And American Barley just made for heavy, hazy beer

Bush and other German Brewers started looking at other styles of Beers, and came upon Karl Balling and Anton Schwartz's work at the Prague Polytechnic Institute with the Brewers in Bohemia who when faced with a grain shortage started using adjuncts, which produced the pils which was light, sparkly and fruity tasting...just the thing for American tastebuds.

So the brewers brought Schwartz to America where he went to work for American Brewer Magazine writing articles and technical monographs, teaching American brewers how to use Rice and Corn...

The sad moral of the story is....The big corporate brewers did not foist tasteless adjunct laced fizzy water on us, like the popular mythology all of us beersnobs like to take to bed with us to feel all warm and elitist....it was done because our American ancestors wanted it.

Listen to this from Basic Brewing;

Quote:
November 30, 2006 - Ambitious Brew Part One
We learn about the history of beer in the USA from Maureen Ogle, author of "Ambitious Brew - The Story of American Beer." Part one takes us from the Pilgrims to Prohibition.

http://media.libsyn.com/media/basicb...br11-30-06.mp3

December 7, 2006 - Ambitious Brew Part Two
We continue our discussion about the history of beer in the USA with Maureen Ogle, author of "Ambitious Brew - The Story of American Beer." Part two takes us from Prohibition to the present day.

http://media.libsyn.com/media/basicb...br12-07-06.mp3
And actually many ale brewers use the same adjuncts in our beer. I've used corn in a few beers to add some creaminess or to thin out and dry the beers some, and they are drunk at whatever temp the style call for.

In fact some commercial bmc, if you let them warm up a bit actually have a nice taste. I've noticed it with lagers that utilize corn as their adjunct rather than the rice that Imbev/AH uses in their bud products. Llabatt's Blue actually taste pretty nice after the "chill" is taken away.
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Old 09-26-2009, 03:12 PM   #4
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Thanks for the clarification

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Old 09-26-2009, 03:16 PM   #5
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Thanks for the clarification
Ogle cleared up a lot of those "beer myths" that we beer snobs used to harbor to "keep us warm" and to somehow make us think that we're better than those who drink Bud products.....
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Old 09-26-2009, 03:21 PM   #6
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Another cool thing mentioned in that book is that almost all brewing in the States done before the mid 19th century was homebrewing. A lot of this was due to labor shortages and cider was a hell of a lot less time consuming to make. Every source I have seen said that if anyone did go to the trouble of producing a large scale batch it was typically distilled into whiskey. I have a hard time seeing this happening in ANY European country because it is so engrained in their culture as an important part of the meal. Our whole American culture being used to excess just looks at beer differently.

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Old 09-26-2009, 03:29 PM   #7
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Revvy,

I haven't noticed you pasting this in any of the big bad evil BMC companies threads but you should.

For everyone's purported expertise in beer there is little in fact knowledge of actual history. The plain fact of the matter is that corporations ALWAYS give the public what they ask for and the ones that give the public most exactly what they want are the ones that become big. BMC is not big because of some hideous conspiracy but because they gave they public that fizzy yellow drink that most quenched their thirst. And still does. If there was any shift in the opposite direction then BL would not be the best selling beer in the world.

I cringe every time there is a thread discussing the ignorance of the masses 'who just don't realize that the beer they drink sucks and that they need to be educated.' People drink that beer because that is what they like OVER craft beer. Not because they are ignorant, and to assume otherwise is the height of arrogance. And another misperception is that BMC is popular only because of insidiuous marketing. In truth marketing responds to preference to doesn't shape it. People don't choose Bud because 3 frogs tell them to. Bud realizes what people want and demand and the job of the marketing department is to pass along the message that yes, we have that.

Except in small pockets of society, the majority of the public, worldwide, prefers a very crisp, ice cold, refreshing beverage with just a little flavor to offset the carbonic bite. Heck, even in mainland Europe lagers are preferred over ales.

I appreciate you putting this history out there in the public HBT record, Revvy.

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Old 09-26-2009, 03:31 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonedef131 View Post
Another cool thing mentioned in that book is that almost all brewing in the States done before the mid 19th century was homebrewing. A lot of this was due to labor shortages and cider was a hell of a lot less time consuming to make. Every source I have seen said that if anyone did go to the trouble of producing a large scale batch it was typically distilled into whiskey. I have a hard time seeing this happening in ANY European country because it is so engrained in their culture as an important part of the meal. Our whole American culture being used to excess just looks at beer differently.
I liked how she also busted a lot of other myths about beer.

At the 1893 Columbian World Exposition in Chicago, Frederick Pabst pronounced himself winner of the Exposition’s grand prize, but there was no grand prize to win. The judges of the brewing exhibits were forbidden from awarding ranked prizes for first, second, and third place. Every exhibitor left the Exposition with the same bronze commemorative medallion, regardless of the quality of his beer. His "victory" is still commemorated on the label to this day.

So this,



Is really just another marketing myth.

And this....

Quote:
Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy

–Benjamin Franklin
From Maureen Ogle's Book, Ambitious Brew, the story of American Brewing.

Quote:
In recent years, beer drinkers have worn t-shirts decorated with a quote attributed to Ben Franklin: "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." Just one problem: Franklin didn't say that. It's a mangled version of another Franklin quote about the pleasures of wine. In a 1779 letter, he wrote that the rain that fell on vineyards and transformed vines into grapes for wine provided "a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy."
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Old 09-26-2009, 04:07 PM   #9
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Hi. I agree that there is too much beer snobbery sometimes and that BMC is BMC because that's what many, many people want to drink.

But . . .

People also want to eat at McDonalds. And at KFC. And corporate practices are often designed to intentionally manipulate consumers, to buy inferior/unsafe/unhealthful or just plain junky products.

I'm just suggesting that its not as simple as saying that its only about what the consumer wants - the consumer's desires don't exist in a vacuum. They are shaped by many forces. Nothing posted above contradicts that - I'm not really arguing with anyone, just expounding.

Another tangent - I applaud AB for experimenting with other "better" brews - American Ale, Shock Top, et. al. Good for them!

FWIW, put me in the category of really enjoying BMC-ish beers - honestly, my favorite homebrews are probably my blonde, cream and Kolsch ales. I just think mine taste way better than the BMC offerings.

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Old 09-26-2009, 04:16 PM   #10
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I find Millers to taste lot better after the chill is gone.

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