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-   -   Brewing Instructions from 1861 (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/brewing-instructions-1861-a-221724/)

nobita 01-31-2011 03:22 AM

Brewing Instructions from 1861
 
Found this link and just had to share...

http://brewery.org/brewery/library/Per1861UK.html

MX1 01-31-2011 05:56 AM

well I'll be...that is exactly how I do it

T

djonas 01-31-2011 06:06 AM

Interesting.

jeffmeh 01-31-2011 08:10 AM

Interesting indeed.

Hawklock77 01-31-2011 12:19 PM

I love the old dialect, good find.

Revvy 01-31-2011 12:23 PM

Fun, thanks. Actually that's the era of brewing I'm interested in. I've been researching the breweries of Michigan's thumb in that period for a book.

Thanks!

Baldy_Beer_Brewery 01-31-2011 12:27 PM

What is this? I thought John Palmer invented brewing.

JadeMonkeyStang 01-31-2011 12:35 PM

That was a really interesting excerpt, thanks for posting it. I'm honestly very surprised about how close that is to our current brewing practices and about some of the details that were included such as the importance of chilling the beer quickly. Sounds like they had has many of the details figured out as their technology would allow.

Revvy 01-31-2011 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JadeMonkeyStang (Post 2599863)
That was a really interesting excerpt, thanks for posting it. I'm honestly very surprised about how close that is to our current brewing practices and about some of the details that were included such as the importance of chilling the beer quickly. Sounds like they had has many of the details figured out as their technology would allow.

But the mid-to late 1800's was thebeginning of the height of modern brewing, this was the start of the "German Invasion" and the shift away from Ales towards the American Lager. This was when Anton Schwartz and Karl Balling at at the Prague Polytechnic Institute (and Later in America) were developing ways to handle hazy American 6-row and mashing Corn and Rice (which wqas really expensive AND complicated and why Budweiser was the most expensive beer on the market when it came out. Like 17.00/bottle in 1860's money)

All sorts of developments in brewing were hapenning, bottling lines, transportation, refrigeration.

The 1860's was sort of the golden age of modern brewing, and most everything we do today started to be developed during that time.

We're not talking the Stone Age here...Just the opposite, the beginning of the modern industrial era.

Quote:

November 30, 2006 - Ambitious Brew Part One
We learn about the history of beer in the USA from Maureen Ogle, author of "Ambitious Brew - The Story of American Beer." Part one takes us from the Pilgrims to Prohibition.

http://media.libsyn.com/media/basicbrewing/bbr11-30-06.mp3

December 7, 2006 - Ambitious Brew Part Two
We continue our discussion about the history of beer in the USA with Maureen Ogle, author of "Ambitious Brew - The Story of American Beer." Part two takes us from Prohibition to the present day.

http://media.libsyn.com/media/basicbrewing/bbr12-07-06.mp3

jeffmeh 01-31-2011 01:04 PM

And how could they possibly make beer without a chiller? :p


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