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Old 02-04-2009, 06:06 AM   #1
z987k
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First off what ever happened to the book review forum? Am I somehow missing it?

Next, recently I can't get enough books that are very technical about brewing. I've been looking at a few and wondered if anyone else has read them and if they are worth it. (I know education over brew gear wtf am I thinking, lol) But really the reason behind it, is my beer must be of the utmost quality in every aspect, bar none. I know there is a lot about brewing I don't know so....

First is the A textbook of brewing by De Clerk translated from German. It's old but it doesn't seem like things have changed all that much.

Next is "Principals of brewing Science"

And possibly Technology brewing and malting from Siebel.


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Old 02-04-2009, 06:22 AM   #2
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I have Principles of Brewing Science, and it's a good book. It's not very big, but there is a wealth of information about all of the processes involved in brewing. There are a few errors that you can spot with a fine toothed comb (such as getting the diagram of certain amino acids wrong), but the only negative reviews I've heard about it are either:

1) it's too technical for people without any biochemistry in their background

or

2) he cites himself way too much.

But if bonding diagrams, lists of sugars, proteins, enzymes, and amino acids are what you're looking for then it's a good little book.

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Old 02-04-2009, 07:25 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by heinz57 View Post
I have Principles of Brewing Science, and it's a good book. It's not very big, but there is a wealth of information about all of the processes involved in brewing. There are a few errors that you can spot with a fine toothed comb (such as getting the diagram of certain amino acids wrong), but the only negative reviews I've heard about it are either:

1) it's too technical for people without any biochemistry in their background

or

2) he cites himself way too much.

But if bonding diagrams, lists of sugars, proteins, enzymes, and amino acids are what you're looking for then it's a good little book.
I think I'll check it out, since I just found it in the library here.
Kind of funny he cites himself a lot. It is annoying, but if it's right, well...

Also I found the book "Essay's in Brewing", every chapter in pdf if anyone is interested in that.
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Old 02-04-2009, 07:55 AM   #4
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My compliments to the U of I library system for carrying home brewing books.

Are the essays any good? If so, I'll take the PDF.

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Old 02-04-2009, 08:01 AM   #5
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My compliments to the U of I library system for carrying home brewing books.

Are the essays any good? If so, I'll take the PDF.
You'd be surprised what I've found in the last few days. We have this thing where we can search articles from Ebsco, InfoTrac, Scopus, a few ebooks websites and more.
For example searching for "brewing science" returns over 1000 book results, and 10,000 journal or magazine articles.

I haven't had a chance to read the PDF yet, but the abstract was good enough to make me download it. PM me you're e-mail address and I'll send you them in a tarball or zipped, whichever you prefer.

edit: and after just reading through the color chapter... yes, very good. For example, I did not know this:

Quote:
Addition of sulfur dioxide, often in the form of KMS (potassium meta-bisulfite), will stall the early stages of melanoidin formation by binding to aldehyde groups, and so acts as a bleach; however, SO2 does not bleach color already formed, and has little or no effect on the Strecker degradation (see below).

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Old 02-04-2009, 08:15 AM   #6
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I just recently found RapidLibrary myself. It's great for free text books. The quality isn't the best for all files, but I downloaded Shankar's quantum mechanics book and saved about $60. I think that alone was worth it.

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