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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Bleeding pressure on overprimed bottles
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Old 01-14-2010, 06:54 PM   #1
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Default Bleeding pressure on overprimed bottles

I brewed a double chocolate stout a while back and had the brilliant (yeah right) idea that I would prime with cherry concentrate. Here's the original thread: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/prim...te-155872-new/

Anyway, long story short, I overprimed on accident. I ended up putting what amounts to 313g. of "sugar" (as it's listed on the nutritional info) into a 5.5g. batch. (As opposed to the recommended 128g. so I overprimed by a factor of about 2.5.) This will no doubt create bottle bombs after a while so I decided to bleed some pressure.

So just about 6 days into bottle conditioning I decided to bleed the pressure from the bottles by cracking the caps and letting them sit around for a while, then recapping them.

Turns out it's a good thing I didn't wait longer. The 12 oz bottles are just on the verge of becoming gushers, and I'm having to release pressure in stages otherwise I get a bit of foaming out the top. The 22 oz bottles are definitely gushers and I have to vent pressure without compromising the bottle cap too much so it stays relatively sealed even after I vent. The 1L flip tops are downright dangerous.

I poured one out to taste it... There is a lot of sweetness still (from the excessive amount of cherry concentrate I used to prime it). A lot of front end cherry flavor and smell, and a pretty serious cherry finish. The roasted malt is nearly impossible to detect but the chocolate is there. It's too sweet for my taste, but I'm hoping that will change as it finishes conditioning.

Do you guys think venting pressure once during bottle conditioning is enough?

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Old 01-14-2010, 07:02 PM   #2
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Venting is tricky... When I brewed my AHS pumpkin, 5 days after priming (only my 3rd brew... I just couldn't wait) I flipped the top on one of them to take a sip. It was a gusher. Actually, they all were. I even cut back on the priming sugar. I vented all the bottles once and put them away. I think what happened though is that the beer didn't have enough time to absorb the co2 because the few that I have left now (a few months later) are barely carbonated. Perfect for my tastes, but most people think they're too flat.

I just realized this is probably no help at all... sorry.

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Old 01-14-2010, 07:09 PM   #3
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Did you happen to chill the bottle down that you first opened and gushed, or was it room temp, because honestly any bottle in the first week or so of carbing, if opened warm will usually gush. Because it is NOT at the stage where the co2 has been reabsorbed into the liquid.

Before you mess with the bottles, I would relax and let them go the full three weeks minimum and then chill one down for 48 hours and see what the real experience is.

Chilling for a couple days will force the co2 back into solution.

If you look at the video in my Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning blog, you will see that often "normally" carbed beer will gush within the first week....and be perfectly fine at 3 weeks.

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Old 01-14-2010, 07:22 PM   #4
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I hear you guys that absorbing of CO2 takes time and I guess that is probably the main reason they are gushing right now. Also I did not chill them in the fridge (though I probably should have) and I'm sure this didn't help either.

However, I didn't want to wait 3 weeks to try one because I calculated that I would end up with about 5 units of carbonation in the 12 ozers, and even more in the 22's and 1L bottles. I felt that this would result in bottle bombs for sure so I wanted to vent them proactively to prevent this.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I know they are overprimed, and I'm not assuming they are overprimed because they are gushing on me 6 days in. I'm just trying to figure if venting them once is enough... I guess it's pretty hard to tell because I have no idea how much of the priming sugar is left in solution right now.

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Old 01-14-2010, 07:23 PM   #5
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I've got an orange hefeweizen that's somewhat overcarbed. When you pour it, the foam takes up about half the glass.

So what's the process? Do I just pop off one cap and pop the new one on right away? Do I give it a few minutes to vent CO2? Or what? These are NOT bottle bombs, just overcarbed somewhat.

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Old 01-14-2010, 10:35 PM   #6
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Well, if they are overcarbed but not exploding, I'd leave them. Having just done this myself, it's a huge PITA and it makes a mess.

You have to open the cap (but leave it on the bottle) and leave it for a while to decarb slightly. If you recap them straight away, you haven't done much for decreasing the amount of carbonation in there (think about how beer stays carbonated for a while after you pour it). If you have gushers, this makes a huge mess. I ended up putting the whole batch in a plastic tub, and leaving them to make a mess in there, probably lost a few bottles worth, a little bit out of each bottle due to foaming out.

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