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Old 01-23-2013, 05:12 AM   #11
dlaramie08
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Read brewchem 101. Seemed very simplistic, however I have had 4 years of chemistry. For someone with less of a background it's a great read.

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Old 01-23-2013, 05:52 AM   #12
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I consider Designing Great Beers to be the single most used book in my arsenal.
Radical Brewing is a great read from a historical perspective and filled with enough anecdotes to keep it fun.

Read a book recently on farmhouse brewing specifically dealing with Saisons and Bier de Garde, interesting read even though it is probably a pair of styles I won't be tackling in the near future, but well worth reading (not sure the author)

Next book will be Yeast, I know very little about yeast but I do know it is probably the single most important factor in brewing. Hopefully this book gives me good insight as to just how important and ideas on better management of my yeast.

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Old 01-23-2013, 06:58 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hcuda
Has anyone read
Brewchem 101
or
Extreme Brewing-Sam Calagione
Extreme brewing was the first book I read. It's a bit outdated in some of the methods IMO and more geared towards the beginner extract brewer. But it has recommended quantities for some interesting ingredients like herbs and spices as well as fruit, which I like. The other sections in the book have good beer and food pairings, beer food recipes, and great beer recipes. The recipes are for extract but I've never had any trouble converting them to AG.
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Old 01-23-2013, 07:23 AM   #14
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A lot of people seem to hate it but I'm going to recommend Gordon Strong's Brewing Better Beer. It doesn't tell you how to do anything or provide step by step instructions but it gives a lot of really good tips on what you should be doing at a high level and leaves the process details up to you. And it is the only book i've seen that presents water chemistry for homebrewing in a decent, reasonable and comprehensible manner - no over-complicated residual alkalinity or make believe classic city profiles. It says its for "advanced brewers" but if you've already read How To Brew and done at least 1 all grain batch, you are "advanced" enough

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Old 01-23-2013, 07:31 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gbx View Post
A lot of people seem to hate it but I'm going to recommend Gordon Strong's Brewing Better Beer. It doesn't tell you how to do anything or provide step by step instructions but it gives a lot of really good tips on what you should be doing at a high level and leaves the process details up to you. And it is the only book i've seen that presents water chemistry for homebrewing in a decent, reasonable and comprehensible manner - no over-complicated residual alkalinity or make believe classic city profiles. It says its for "advanced brewers" but if you've already read How To Brew and done at least 1 all grain batch, you are "advanced" enough
As much as I hate to agree, this book is useful. Gordon comes across loving himself and writes a lot about how great he is as a brewer, which isn't great to read. But, it is useful, goes through the whole brewing process in detail and gives good information on various techniques that you can use.

I also found yeast and for the love of hops very useful. As well as principles of brewing science (although hard to read if not familiar with scientific textbooks)
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:04 AM   #16
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If you like IPA's, Mitch Steele's book is very good. He is the Brewmaster at Stone. The first half is heavy on the history of IPA's, then he gets into brewing techniques and recipes.

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Old 01-23-2013, 11:39 PM   #17
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Thanks for all the replies! I have been poking around on Amazon, and I think maybe I'll get the Gordon Strong book. I don't think it's going to bother me if he comes off as a bit self-important. I'm thinking that other books might be a bit more redundant with what I have already read.

Although it's not a brewing book per se, I'm also thinking about reading Randy Mosher's beer tasting book. Has anyone read that? It has rave reviews on Amazon, and I really liked Radical Brewing, so I bet I'd like it.

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