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Old 01-28-2013, 04:49 AM   #1
Stovetop535
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Default Belgian Golden Strong Ale-Timeline?

I am looking to brew a belgian golden strong ale to have for two graduation parties in May (Wife is graduating from Nursing school, youngest brother is graduating from highschool). I have a number of other brews I will be brewing for the event, but I wanted to have something different on hand for some of my friends and family that are beer heads. I love belgian beers and I have a little over 3 months till the parties which is what led me to the golden strong ale. (the high abv of this brew does not bother me, I am not planning on kegging this, this one will be bottled and passed out to select few.

This is the recipe I have been eyeing, unless someone can talk me out of it and provide another recipe. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f73/dirty-monk-belgian-golden-strong-ale-80621/

I am planning on brewing on tuseday, and the brew will need to be ready by May 4. That gives me months and 5 days to have this ready, and this is where I am looking for suggestions on my timeline.

The recipe says 2 weeks primary followed by 6 weeks secondary. Space and storage is not a concern, since the entire basement is my brewery (one of the few pros to having an unfinished basement). Basically I am asking what would you do, to make the best brew possible with a 3 month timeline?

1 month primary followed by 1 month secondary then bottle and prime for the last month?

Or shorter primary, shorter secondary and bottle longer?

Or some variation in between?

Tia for the help

Alex

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Old 01-28-2013, 05:37 AM   #2
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Let me preface this: I have not brewed this style. However, most my beers are over 10% or slightly under.

I would follow the recipe, primary for 2 1/2 to 3 weeks, secondary for 5 weeks then bottle.

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Old 01-28-2013, 05:42 AM   #3
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Sounds good. This will be my biggest beer yet and the first beer I will bottle. I started brewing and went straight to the kegs. With a big beer like this and a 8 week timeline before bottling, will I need to re pitch any yeast to get the bottles darned in time? I would not be very happy with myself to plan a brew out like this and not allow enough time to bottle carb it up.

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Old 01-28-2013, 05:53 AM   #4
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The recipe is complicated. It could be simplified greatly without any ill effect on the beer. Drop the aromatic, go with one hop or two hops not three. Go with a single infusion at 149F.

Plan on using a fining like gelatin to clear the beer in a timely fashion. Make sure you have an ample starter. Keep the fermentation controlled. Start cool, like 62-64 for the first two days and ramp up to 80F. Make sure you oxygenate ideally with pure O2.

This beer will not clear in a reasonable time without the gelatin. If you primary for 3 weeks, transfer to secondary, cold crash at 27F for two weeks, gelatin for a week, bottle, and then let them prime there's about 7-8 weeks. Then you have a month to let the bottle do their magic.

You could add some yeast at the end of fermentation before bottling. If you go with 100,000 cells per ml that's maybe 7-15ml of slurry.

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Old 01-28-2013, 02:23 PM   #5
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I'm currently brewing Jamil's Belgian golden strong, so I feel you on the slow flocculating yeast.

I'll say this - brew NOW if you want any hope of this being ready by May 4. From what I understand, BGS is a style that really benefits from some extended aging.

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Old 01-28-2013, 03:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highgravitybacon View Post
The recipe is complicated. It could be simplified greatly without any ill effect on the beer. Drop the aromatic, go with one hop or two hops not three. Go with a single infusion at 149F.

Plan on using a fining like gelatin to clear the beer in a timely fashion. Make sure you have an ample starter. Keep the fermentation controlled. Start cool, like 62-64 for the first two days and ramp up to 80F. Make sure you oxygenate ideally with pure O2.

This beer will not clear in a reasonable time without the gelatin. If you primary for 3 weeks, transfer to secondary, cold crash at 27F for two weeks, gelatin for a week, bottle, and then let them prime there's about 7-8 weeks. Then you have a month to let the bottle do their magic.

You could add some yeast at the end of fermentation before bottling. If you go with 100,000 cells per ml that's maybe 7-15ml of slurry.
Thanks. I picked up some whirfloc for the boil and gelatin to use later on.

If a single infusion at 149 will work without any change, than I will just do that. No need to reinvent the wheel if I do not have to.

As for the Aromatic grain, I already ordered some so I will probably just use it, and the same is true for the hops unless you think the 3 hops and the aromatic will have a negative effect? Again, first timer on a beer like this that I hope to serve to friends-so I am hoping for a final product I can be proud of.

I do not have access to pure o2, but I did buy one of those mix stir's for the drill, which seems to be working pretty well. I will sit there and whip it back and forth for awhile. I usually aerate, once cooled, both pre and post pitching of the yeast for a 3 min.

I like the looks of the time line you posted. Since I have the room in my fridge-would a week long cold crash at the end of the 3 week primary be helpful?

Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewdad View Post
I'm currently brewing Jamil's Belgian golden strong, so I feel you on the slow flocculating yeast.

I'll say this - brew NOW if you want any hope of this being ready by May 4. From what I understand, BGS is a style that really benefits from some extended aging.
I am planning on brewing tomorrow. Mondays and tuesdays are my days off from work now, and it took my lhbs a few weeks to get a sack of belgian pils malt in. I am hoping it will make it by that first week in may.

Still trying to iron out all the details for tomorrow, but either way im sure it will turn out.

Thanks again for the help everyone
Alex
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Old 01-28-2013, 05:56 PM   #7
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Another question for everyone on the hop additions-

Being that the recipe posted is from 2008, the AA's of the hops used and mine are quite a bit different. The recipe posted has and estimated Ibu of 34.4, and if I plug the numbers in it gives me an estimated ibu of 45.5. Is this a big enough difference to notice? If I back down the two Saaz and Tettnang additions to .75 instead of a full ounce, it drops my ibu down to 35. Is this what you would do?

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Old 01-28-2013, 06:35 PM   #8
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Double check your AA percentages to be sure that they match - you may not be comparing apples to apples. Also note that the recipe may be assuming a different IBU scale than you are (Tinseth vs Ranger, etc).

My BGS is in the upper 20s for IBUs, with an OG of 1.072; Beersmith says that the style upper limit is 35 (Tinseth). 45 sounds high to me.

Doesn't mean that 45 *is* too high, however. You may enjoy a hoppier BGS. Yay for homebrew creative freedom.

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Check out the priming sugar calculator and the beer calorie calculator.

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Lagering: Swarthy Satyr (traditional bock)
Bottled: Royal Goblin (Hoppy Hobgoblin rendition), Treasure Type "T" (oatmeal toffee stout), Enchantress (big Irish red ale), Frostfire (Oktoberfest), Thundersmoke brown ale
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stovetop535 View Post

Thanks. I picked up some whirfloc for the boil and gelatin to use later on.

If a single infusion at 149 will work without any change, than I will just do that. No need to reinvent the wheel if I do not have to.

As for the Aromatic grain, I already ordered some so I will probably just use it, and the same is true for the hops unless you think the 3 hops and the aromatic will have a negative effect? Again, first timer on a beer like this that I hope to serve to friends-so I am hoping for a final product I can be proud of.

I do not have access to pure o2, but I did buy one of those mix stir's for the drill, which seems to be working pretty well. I will sit there and whip it back and forth for awhile. I usually aerate, once cooled, both pre and post pitching of the yeast for a 3 min.

I like the looks of the time line you posted. Since I have the room in my fridge-would a week long cold crash at the end of the 3 week primary be helpful?
Very. It will help clear your beer dramatically. A >8% beer wont freeze until 27-28. I don't have a fridge so I actually stuck it outside in a shed for a few days until the temps got really cold. That helped but not as much as a proper lagering would. It also drops a profuse amount of haze, though the Euro pils I used is lower in protein than some. Nothing looks better than an 8-9% beer that could pass for a pils in the glass.

The gelatin works very well. I had great luck using it in a cider that just wouldn't quit, and just plopped some in a tripel that wont clear. There is something in my brew process I need to straighten up because it seems like this shouldn't be happening with this frequency.

I'm sure the malt and hops will work just fine that you ordered.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:51 PM   #10
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Hop #'s from the recipe are
@90 min = 1 oz Saaz 5.8%
@90 min = 1 oz Hallertauer 4.2%
@15 min = 1 oz Tettnang 6.0%

My packages say

Saaz 7.6%
Hallertauer 3.9%
Tettnang 4.7%

Still a new guy to brewing, so I was not even aware of the different IBU scales. I will have to read up on that some more. I want this to be pretty true to category, and I am far from a "hop head", so I may scale back a little. I would imagine it would be best to scale back the two 90 min additions, rather than the 15?

I will definitely cold crash the primary before racking. The basement fridge sets right at 34*, so getting it down another couple degrees will not be a problem-especially since all I store in there is brewing stuff. I bought a temp controller to lager beers with and still have not used it. Looks like I now have a reason to hook it up.

Even though this is not a lager beer, it will still age correctly if its in the fridge for 4 weeks?

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