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Old 02-02-2013, 12:54 AM   #1
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Default Beer not carbing

Is it because I'm leaving it in the carboy too long? Recipe calls for 2 weeks,,,,,,but I have gone two weeks then 1 week 2nd fermentation on one batch and another just 3 weeks straight before bottling on another batch.

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Old 02-02-2013, 01:01 AM   #2
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How long has it been bottled and what temp is it at?

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Old 02-02-2013, 01:02 AM   #3
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How long have they been in the bottles. What size bottles, what's the gravity of the beer, what temp are you carbing them at? And did you add priming sugar?

There are NO real bottling problems, only patience ones. And length of time in primary does NOT inhibit carbonation.

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers in 12 ounce bottles, to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer. Beers in bigger bottles that take longer. Beers below 70 degrees take longer.

Temp and gravity are the two most important factors as to how long it will take.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

And just because a beer is carbed doesn't mean it still doesn't taste like a$$ and need more time for the off flavors to condition out.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

Carbonation is actually foolproof, you add sugar, the yeast eats it and farts co2 which carbs the beer. It's not a complex system, and there's very little that can go wrong...It just takes time.....

There really is no other answer than patience, because there really isn't a problem. It really is a simply and fool proof process. The problem arises that we try to govern the behavior based on our timeframe, and not the yeast's. They don't read calendars or instruction sheets, they just do their own thing in however long it takes them.

I've been doing this for years, and bottled nearly a thousand gallons of beer, and have never had one that didn't carb eventually. And I don't do anything special to them at bottling day, that isn't explained in my bottling sticky. You just gotta wait.

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Old 02-02-2013, 07:51 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
How long have they been in the bottles. What size bottles, what's the gravity of the beer, what temp are you carbing them at? And did you add priming sugar?

There are NO real bottling problems, only patience ones. And length of time in primary does NOT inhibit carbonation.

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers in 12 ounce bottles, to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer. Beers in bigger bottles that take longer. Beers below 70 degrees take longer.

Temp and gravity are the two most important factors as to how long it will take.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

And just because a beer is carbed doesn't mean it still doesn't taste like a$$ and need more time for the off flavors to condition out.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

Carbonation is actually foolproof, you add sugar, the yeast eats it and farts co2 which carbs the beer. It's not a complex system, and there's very little that can go wrong...It just takes time.....

There really is no other answer than patience, because there really isn't a problem. It really is a simply and fool proof process. The problem arises that we try to govern the behavior based on our timeframe, and not the yeast's. They don't read calendars or instruction sheets, they just do their own thing in however long it takes them.

I've been doing this for years, and bottled nearly a thousand gallons of beer, and have never had one that didn't carb eventually. And I don't do anything special to them at bottling day, that isn't explained in my bottling sticky. You just gotta wait.
Revvy, have you kept track of how many times you have copied and pasted this? It has to be over 50
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:06 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beer_Eugenics

Revvy, have you kept track of how many times you have copied and pasted this? It has to be over 50
Ha...I was thinking the same thing. Revvy always answers so quick and with so much information that the old cut and paste would be the only explanation!
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:33 AM   #6
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I'd like to emphasize Revvy's point about bigger beers taking longer to carbonate. My experience has been that full bodied beers also take longer to carbonate, even if they only have a moderate ABV.

I'd also like to point out that there's a difference between CO2 being present in the bottle and your beer being carbonated. Your beer will need at least two to three days in the fridge to absorb the CO2, especially if you're trying to drink your beers within a few weeks of bottling. CO2 is absorbed faster at lower temperatures. Keep in mind that a large head does not always mean your beer is carbonated. It's just a result of CO2 coming out of suspension.

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Old 02-02-2013, 02:11 PM   #7
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Can beer be left in the carboy too long? Won't yeast die if there is nothing to eat? A couple of reasons why I am going to dump my raspberry wheat is because I need the bottles.....Coffee Porter is due to be bottled this weekend. I'm going with my HBS recipe recommendations,,,,,,2 weeks fermentation.

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Old 02-02-2013, 02:30 PM   #8
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Go to a local grocery store, and ask if you could buy empty bottles. Soak them in oxyclean and hot water for 24h, and there you go, you have bottles....!

No need for this dumping beer nonsense!!! ;-)

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Old 02-02-2013, 02:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PackerfaninSanDiego View Post
Can beer be left in the carboy too long? Won't yeast die if there is nothing to eat? A couple of reasons why I am going to dump my raspberry wheat is because I need the bottles.....Coffee Porter is due to be bottled this weekend. I'm going with my HBS recipe recommendations,,,,,,2 weeks fermentation.
Yeat go dormant when there is nothing to eat. They do not die.

I hav a beautifully carbed (possibly even a tad overcarbed) imperial nut brown ale that went about five months between primary and secondary.

Look up "bulk aging", you'll see that lots of brewers do this for big beers.

I added no yeast at bottling time, and as stated above, the botles carbed up great.

Your two weeks is what a lot of us would consider as an absolute minum amout of time in a fermenter. Certainly not enough to bother the yeast and keep them from carbing.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:59 PM   #10
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Describe your bottling process. You really haven't given us anything to go on to help you...

You gotta help us to help you.

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