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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Baking Bread?
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Old 09-30-2005, 02:32 PM   #1
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Default Baking Bread?

I know what your thinking... baking Bread? What the heck does that have to do with brewing beer? Well I read that old time bakeries got there yeast from breweries, I was just wondering if anyone has tried using the trub to make bread.

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Old 09-30-2005, 03:45 PM   #2
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Not personally. But an old buddy of mine does it all the time. Makes some of the best bread you'll ever have.

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Old 09-30-2005, 04:10 PM   #3
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That would be an interesting experiment... let us know if you try it, I bet you could make some very different breads using brewer's yeasts.

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Old 09-30-2005, 04:34 PM   #4
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I've been wondering the same thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by timdsmith72
... an old buddy of mine does it all the time. Makes some of the best bread you'll ever have.
could you get a recipe?
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Old 09-30-2005, 05:07 PM   #5
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Tonight is pizza night so I'll be making to batches of pizza dough, one with the trub the other with regular bakers yeast just in case the trub dough doesn't rise.

I also bake sourdough bread, or did until my starter died. It takes a week to get that stuff going, you take a quart jar and mix a cup of flour and a cup of water, leave the lid off, set it on the counter and stir it every time you walk by it. If you've ever had sourdough bread you'll know why you don't want wild yeast in your beer.

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Old 09-30-2005, 05:16 PM   #6
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I've read that some people use spent grain to bake bread. I would think you would need to grind the spent grain into a flour-like consistency. I recall reading that using beer yeast in bread takes too long to rise. I've been holding on to this recipe, done by a person named Chad Clancy. I saved it long ago from another brewing forum:

Chad's Spent Grain Bread
---------------------------
1.5 tsp bread yeast (rehyrdrated in 1/2 cup warm water for about 15 minutes)
2.5 cups white flour
1.5 cups wheat flour
1 Tbsp salt
1.0+/- cups spent grain
1/3 cup light DME
1/4 cup honey
1/3 cup olive oil
3/4 cup water


Mix in a bread machine on the dough cycle or a KitchenaAid with a dough hook. The amounts of flour are approximate - add more flour or liquid to get the right texture (just slighly sticky).


After the dough has been mixed and let to rise and punched down and allowed to rise again (doubling each time), turn the dough out onto a floured surface and form into loaves, rolls or whatever. Place in a well greased pan and allow to rise until doubled (keep in a warm area). Bake at 375 deg. F oven for 25-30 minutes until deep brown on top.

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Old 09-30-2005, 05:36 PM   #7
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The way you get around the slow rise is to make a sponge. The way I do it for pizza dough is, 1 cup warm water, 1 tsp honey, 2 tsp yeast stir til the honey and yeast disolves then add 1 cup flour and stir until smooth, cover the bowl and let it set on the counter. This provides a nice nutrient rich enviroment for the yeast to do their thing, you can make this 12 hours ahead if you wish, a minimum of 4 hours. When you are ready to make the dough you just add the other ingredients, in this case a little olive oil a tsp salt and slowly add flour until it is firm enough to turn out on to the counter and begin kneading. after kneading let it rise like normal, you can let it rise once or twice its up to you.

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Old 09-30-2005, 05:42 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldo
The way you get around the slow rise is to make a sponge...
Ah, that makes sense; kind of like making a starter. I bet most people just dump the yeast in and wait.

Have you used different yeast strains and, if so, was there a taste difference?
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Old 09-30-2005, 05:47 PM   #9
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When you make sourdough bread you use the sponge for the same reason its slow to rise. You can do it with regular yeast to it makes a much better dough for pizza, you get kind of a beer flavor to the crust.

I just finished making a sponge with my trub should know in an hour if its going to work.

P.S. I made a few edits to the sponge recipe you may want to read it again.

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Old 09-30-2005, 05:49 PM   #10
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This is my first attempt with trub, I'm sure as I brew more beer I will try different yeast to see which is best, I used dry yeast on this batch of beer.

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