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Old 12-30-2012, 04:23 PM   #21
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Yeah,there's two of us now!... Anyway,the 1075 Burton is the pale ale,not 3b. Read up on it.
Here's a link that talks color,etc; http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2011/05/burton-ale-in-1790s.html About 3/4's of the way down the page,besides referrences earlier in the work.
That is patto1ro's own website.

What are people arguing about?
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Old 12-30-2012, 04:32 PM   #22
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The #3 Burton ale turning into pale ale by 1890. It was a pale strong ale to start with. as pale a malt as possible was the order of the day. Others said no,it's a barleywine,dark,& not a pale ale at all,it was a strong ale. It was a strong pale ale,so there. Who said pale ale could only be session strength? The style was just begining to define itself at the time,when viewed from our perspective.
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Old 12-30-2012, 07:50 PM   #23
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The #3 Burton ale turning into pale ale by 1890. It was a pale strong ale to start with. as pale a malt as possible was the order of the day. Others said no,it's a barleywine,dark,& not a pale ale at all,it was a strong ale. It was a strong pale ale,so there. Who said pale ale could only be session strength? The style was just begining to define itself at the time,when viewed from our perspective.
No, that's not true. The exact opposite, in fact. Beers like No. 3 started getting dark around 1900.

The Pale Ale is easy to spot on that list. It's the only one with Pale Ale in the name.
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Old 12-30-2012, 07:59 PM   #24
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From the way I've read all the info on Burtons,it got lighter,not darker. your own words in the description of brewing it bare this out. Geez. First & formost,it was to be brewed as light or "pale" as possible. If you meant the opposit,you should've wrote it that way. And pale ale colors to vary a bit to copper. It absolutely was not like porter or stout. that,good sir,is a falsehood. I wish I could find that site that had pics * posters of it again...
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Old 12-31-2012, 06:39 AM   #25
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From the way I've read all the info on Burtons,it got lighter,not darker. your own words in the description of brewing it bare this out. Geez. First & formost,it was to be brewed as light or "pale" as possible. If you meant the opposit,you should've wrote it that way. And pale ale colors to vary a bit to copper. It absolutely was not like porter or stout. that,good sir,is a falsehood. I wish I could find that site that had pics * posters of it again...
It's very simple: the colour of Buton Ale changed a couple of times.

The 18th-century versions were dark, it became pale in the early 19th century, but started getting darker again in the late 19th century. You're right, it wasn't dark like Porter and Stout but dark like Dark Mild.

If you read 20th-century descriptions of Burton Ale they say it has a dark brown colour. And I've colour numbers for London-brewed Burtons from 1917 onwards. The same colur as Dark Mild.
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Old 01-09-2013, 09:43 PM   #26
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I'm surprised no one mentioned this, or maybe someone did...

I had Maris Otter in the recipe, checking IPA they actually used the lightest possible pilsner malt (1.5 L). I'm going to go with 2 L German pilsner because that's what I've got. Getting the stuff to brew this on Friday.

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Old 01-09-2013, 09:56 PM   #27
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Rex,that bares out what I gathered from the way what I read was worded. If it was copied verbatem,then it does make for some confusion. Like very old cookbooks,you were supposed to know how much of what they told you to use in the recipe. These old beer recipes to seem to read much like that. Wasn't trying to be a dick,but sticking up for what I understood from all I've read about them by way of how they were worded. Not to mention modern Burtons,which are like a medium to dark amber from what I've seen on youtube in the past.
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Old 01-09-2013, 10:04 PM   #28
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Rex,that bares out what I gathered from the way what I read was worded. If it was copied verbatem,then it does make for some confusion. Like very old cookbooks,you were supposed to know how much of what they told you to use in the recipe. These old beer recipes to seem to read much like that. Wasn't trying to be a dick,but sticking up for what I understood from all I've read about them by way of how they were worded. Not to mention modern Burtons,which are like a medium to dark amber from what I've seen on youtube in the past.
Gotcha. I haven't had a chance to read all of IPA but from what I gathered the early Burton ales (1800-1850) were 100% pilsner, 70 IBU, preferably all EKG hops, oak aged, and probably underwent a secondary fermentation with brett.

I think something like that would taste really good. I'm very excited to try brewing this. If it works, it will become one of the special bottled beers at my nano. I'll follow up with how this turns out.
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Old 01-09-2013, 11:29 PM   #29
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Gotcha. I haven't had a chance to read all of IPA but from what I gathered the early Burton ales (1800-1850) were 100% pilsner, 70 IBU, preferably all EKG hops, oak aged, and probably underwent a secondary fermentation with brett.
While the pale malts they were using back in the day may have approached the color of our modern pilsner malts, they certainly weren't made from pilsner as we know it. The consensus with the historical burton recipes is to use British pale malt (or) if you want something paler still, a mix UK and continental pale malt. Dingemans makes a good one I hear. Or, still yet, a British lager malt. No modern pils malt.

Also, remember that brewers went to huge lengths to prevent their oak barrels from imparting wood flavor into their beers. They even used a certain type of oak that didn't impart wood flavor.
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Old 01-09-2013, 11:33 PM   #30
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While the pale malts they were using back in the day may have approached the color of our modern pilsner malts, they certainly weren't made from pilsner as we know it. The consensus with the historical burton recipes is to use British pale malt (or) if you want something paler still, a mix UK and continental pale malt. Dingemans makes a good one I hear. Or, still yet, a British lager malt. No modern pils malt.

Also, remember that brewers went to huge lengths to prevent their oak barrels from imparting wood flavor into their beers. They even used a certain type of oak that didn't impart wood flavor.
Unfortunately I don't have any of those malts. What's wrong with modern pils? To me pils is just grainier and more flavorful than American two-row. If you're saying to use something more neutral, I could use American two-row. I think that might make for a more boring beer, though.

Also, don't you think there'd be a little oak flavor if you're aging a beer 1-2 years in a barrel? I'm just going to do cubes for 3 months.
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