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Old 09-28-2011, 10:25 PM   #21
jason81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bleak
I've made the recipe that Jack Schmidling (whom you may know from the malt mill that he sells), and it really does turn out very thick, much more so than any of the commercial yogurts I've had:

http://schmidling.com/yogurt.htm
Came across this thread last night. Looking to try cheese makeing but no rennet or citric acid yet so I tried this yogurt recipe tonight. Hopfully it turns out good. It did burn a little bit on the bottom while on the stove but I was stiring allot. I put it in my electric smoker after cleaning it, to keep it at 110F Hopfully it doesn't pick up any smokeyness but I thought it would work good to keep a steady warm temp
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Old 10-07-2011, 02:20 AM   #22
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Studies have shown that just a couple of minutes at 180 will only denature a small % of the enzymes that limit thickening. You want to keep it there (I do 90C) for a good 20minutes. After doing so, I had MUCH thicker yogurt. You can strain too but it's a pain imho. I use a Tbsp/qt. innoc. rate. Incubate in my homemade incubator for as long as it takes to get it as sour as I want it. 110F. Longer incubation will only make the yogurt more sour, not thicker. I prefer not to add powders, but the added solids will help make the yogurt thicker.

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Old 11-02-2011, 07:36 PM   #23
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Powdered milk is very unhealthy because of oxidized cholesterol. Homogenization of milk is also bad because it probably promotes atherosclerosis (plaques in your arteries), which leads to heart disease. Non-homogenized whole milk is best for yogurt, or whole goat milk. However, goat milk will make a runnier yogurt because its proteins are different from cow's milk proteins and will not form curds well. Bringing the cow's milk up to 180 degrees will help the yogurt be thicker. If it's already pasteurized milk (recently pasteurized and not sitting in your fridge for a couple of weeks), then it's probably fine to just heat it to around 100-110 degrees and add the yogurt culture. I always let the yogurt incubate for around 24 hours because I like lots of bacteria in there. Low temps of around 100 will help the yogurt not be so tart even after 24 hours. Very delicious!

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Old 12-14-2011, 04:56 PM   #24
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When the wife and I make yogurt we heat milk in mason jars up to ~165 in my brew pot full of water, then we let it cool on the counter for a while until it is <~100 pitch some Greek yogurt, stir it up, put a lid on it and put it into a cooler with some super hot water. The results are pretty good. Always thick. You should let it sit for 4 hours minimum, but up to 24 for yogurt, I think longer will turn it into sour cream. If you want I could try and find the link for the recipe she uses.

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Old 01-09-2012, 02:57 AM   #25
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I use regular whole milk from the local store and use slow cooker, Dannon Brand All Natural Plain Yogurt as the yogurt starter, follow this website Slow Cooker Yogurt . It is easy, and if you want the thicker yogurt, try to wait about 8-10 hours, I make my yogurt success every time just follow the website's steps.

Good luck!

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Old 02-11-2012, 04:11 PM   #26
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I use an electric heating pad set on low. I put a small metal baking pan on top in which I place as many quarts or pints of mason jars filled with my yogurt mixture that I want to turn into yogurt. The jars are topped with plastic wrap and then covered with a dish towel for at least 10-12 hours.

I have used gelatin and nonfat powdered milk for thickening. Both work well, but the powder works better. If you don't add any thickener, I have found that the yogurt is thin and kinda stringy. It tastes fine and I have been making it for at least 5 years.

I wish I had access to Jersey cow milk, but I live in the city!

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Old 02-11-2012, 08:08 PM   #27
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How did you defeat the automatic timer on your heating pad? All of the heating pads I've seen in the last decade have an automatic timer that shuts the pad off after about an hour and a half.

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Old 02-13-2012, 03:02 PM   #28
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For the older style heating pads with no timer check the Salvation Army or garage sales, good luck

thick yogourt can be obtained with the 'right' culture, Jersey milk is the best, we have our own cow...

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Old 05-22-2012, 07:20 AM   #29
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To make a yogurt thick, you have to see the kind of milk you are using. Making yogurt with whole, 5%, or non-fat milk, a higher fat content will definitely give you a thicker, creamier yogurt.

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Old 06-20-2012, 03:20 PM   #30
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I make 3 gallons about once a week. Non homogenized, somewhat local milk (Snowville Farms). Heat to 185°F (180°F comes out too thin)>cool to 115°F>pitch 1T/qt previous batch starter>target temp-105°F>pour into star san-ed mason jars>innoculate overnight in waterbath inside preheated cooler. I've tried many permutations, but this method gets me thick, just sour enough yogurt. I do strain my morning portion overnight in a gold cone coffee filter resting in a qt. pyrex measuring cup. I'll use whole, 2% or a combination of both. The initially culturing was w/ Chobani plain Greek-after a couple of dud trial runs.

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