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Home Brew Forums > Food and Beverage > Cheese Making Forum > Epic Mozz Fail
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Old 07-12-2009, 01:38 AM   #1
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Default Epic Mozz Fail

Ok, re-read my mozz directions. It said to heat the milk to 105* AFTER I added the rennet.


...so I did ( i always take off heat @ 88* & add rennet & let sit for 15 minutes)

I had decent curd formation, but after I dipped most curds out, I was left with a gellationus mass of curds & whey. I could NOT get them to seperate.

Normally I don't get that great of curd formation, but I deal with it. This time I couldn't get the whey out of the curds, so I tossed it.


Any tips/help/suggenstion?

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Old 07-12-2009, 02:47 AM   #2
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Ok, re-read my mozz directions. It said to heat the milk to 105* AFTER I added the rennet.


...so I did ( i always take off heat @ 88* & add rennet & let sit for 15 minutes)

I had decent curd formation, but after I dipped most curds out, I was left with a gellationus mass of curds & whey. I could NOT get them to seperate.

Normally I don't get that great of curd formation, but I deal with it. This time I couldn't get the whey out of the curds, so I tossed it.


Any tips/help/suggenstion?
That's usually a sign of too much chlorine in your water or that your milk is (assuming it isn't ultrapasturized) sitting around too long. Have you gotten good formation with your tap water previously?
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Old 07-12-2009, 05:39 AM   #3
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Ok, re-read my mozz directions. It said to heat the milk to 105* AFTER I added the rennet.


...so I did ( i always take off heat @ 88* & add rennet & let sit for 15 minutes)

I had decent curd formation, but after I dipped most curds out, I was left with a gellationus mass of curds & whey. I could NOT get them to seperate.

Normally I don't get that great of curd formation, but I deal with it. This time I couldn't get the whey out of the curds, so I tossed it.

Any tips/help/suggenstion?
Probably too much rennet. The curd firmed up to quickly and didn't want to expel whey.

I'm not entirely sure about your process for making mozz. It might help if you clarified your process. I generally make cheese that is acidified through fermentation, but many "beginner kits" make you use chemical acidifiers thus creating an artificially moist curd.
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Old 07-12-2009, 03:37 PM   #4
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Bunnay,

I don't follow you on the water angle. Only water is enough to add the CaCl, citric acid & to dissolve the rennet. Maybe 1/2 a cup total. It is filtered througha brita pitcher. Milk was about 4 days from the grocery store. My curd formation has been less than stellar, but good enough. I'm still at the stage where good enough is still good enough. This was batch # 8 or so.

Brewmonger, I have the kit from AHS. You slowly heat to 55*, add CaCl & citric acid, heat to 88*, add rennet (then it said to heat to 105* which I had never done before) then sit for 15 minutes covered, drain off whey & start the mircowave process. Salt to taste.

I used my normal 1/2 rennet tablet.

I've got another gallon of milk in stock, I'll give it a whirl again today without the additional heat to 105*.

This would be expected on the first batch, but not on several batches in, just wierd I guess.

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Old 07-12-2009, 03:59 PM   #5
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Bunnay,

I don't follow you on the water angle. Only water is enough to add the CaCl, citric acid & to dissolve the rennet. Maybe 1/2 a cup total. It is filtered througha brita pitcher. Milk was about 4 days from the grocery store. My curd formation has been less than stellar, but good enough. I'm still at the stage where good enough is still good enough. This was batch # 8 or so.

Brewmonger, I have the kit from AHS. You slowly heat to 55*, add CaCl & citric acid, heat to 88*, add rennet (then it said to heat to 105* which I had never done before) then sit for 15 minutes covered, drain off whey & start the mircowave process. Salt to taste.

I used my normal 1/2 rennet tablet.

I've got another gallon of milk in stock, I'll give it a whirl again today without the additional heat to 105*.

This would be expected on the first batch, but not on several batches in, just wierd I guess.
Chlorine in tap water can inactivate rennet, Brita filters don't necessarily eliminate it. If you have gotten good separation in the past, though, then it is unlikely the problem. As a rule of thumb, the higher the temperature the more moisture is retained in the curds-- I usually won't heat mine past 95* with mozzarella. I don't have experience heating it up as high as 105*, but it's at the cusp of overheating it so that may have been your issue.
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Old 07-12-2009, 04:07 PM   #6
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Bunnay,

I can definately spare a few ounces of bottled water to emilinate the chlorine idea.

I'm gonna try again this evening, this time I'll go back to only heating to 88* like I have in the past.

I'll update later on this evening. Prolly do this after lunch sometime.

Thanks a bunch!

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Old 07-12-2009, 06:00 PM   #7
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Chlorine in tap water can inactivate rennet, Brita filters don't necessarily eliminate it. If you have gotten good separation in the past, though, then it is unlikely the problem. As a rule of thumb, the higher the temperature the more moisture is retained in the curds-- I usually won't heat mine past 95* with mozzarella. I don't have experience heating it up as high as 105*, but it's at the cusp of overheating it so that may have been your issue.
Bunnay, not sure what you mean here. Are you referring to the set temperature or the final cook temperature? The hotter you cook the curds the drier they become.
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Old 07-12-2009, 06:32 PM   #8
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Bunnay, not sure what you mean here. Are you referring to the set temperature or the final cook temperature? The hotter you cook the curds the drier they become.
I was talking about the set temperature, not the cooking. It was my understanding, and this is what I was told as a kid so please correct me if I'm wrong, that the rate of initial coagulation was dependent on enzymatic rate of the rennin and that at higher temperatures with higher rennin activity was best to get larger wetter curds and at lower temperatures the rate of coagulation was slower and better for smaller dryer curds. My experience in cheese making is entirely of the soft mozzarella and farmer's cheese variety so I mostly know what I was taught and has worked for me. I coagulate for mozzarella at 95* and was taught to be careful not to overheat it.

EDIT: Realizing that I was speaking anecdotally, or maybe not anecdotal but folk wisdom based, I looked it up to make sure I wasn't Completely misguided. From Traditional Cheesemaking:

"Rennin is very active and coagulation is rapid at high temperatures: 34 to 36 C. Curd formed at this temperature will be firm and can be cut into large pieces (see p.33) suitable for soft cheese. Within limits, the higher the temperature the more moisture will remain and the softer the cheese. Hard cheese, made from small curds requires a relatively low temperature: 31 to 33 C. At lower temperatures, say 20 to 30 C, milk coagulates very slowly and the subsequent curds will be weak with a lot of fat lost to the whey. In any case, the temperature must remain constant: milk that is allowed to cool during the process will produce irregular curds, have unevenly distributed moisture and lose some casein into the whey. If the milk is either too cold or too hot the rennin will not be active at all."
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Old 07-12-2009, 08:39 PM   #9
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Ok, I tried another batch.

I "hit temperatures" except for the rennet addition, it was at arbout 90* F

It sit undisturbed for 15 minutes , plus 4 or 5 more.

Took the lid off the pot, a gellatinous mass of hot milk crap. So I said, hell with it, I'll strain it till it dies.

So I did. I finally, after numerous rounds through cheesecloth got something out that is posibally the best tasting mozz I've ever made.

THings turned out just fine, but I'm not getting anywhere near the curd formation some poeple are. My curds kinda look like wet cottage cheese.

Tastes preyy d@mn good tho.

Suggestions?

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Old 07-12-2009, 09:00 PM   #10
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Im not going back to edit all those spelling mistakes, I just hope Shecky dosn't see it.

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