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-   -   Yeast starter not that hard (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/yeast-starter-not-hard-2089/)

cbotrice 08-28-2005 05:32 PM

Yeast starter not that hard
 
I took the advice from all the sage brewers here and did a starter for my I did last nite. It worked great, used a 1/2 gallon growler with the 3/4 cup dme and 1 1/2 cup water boiled for 10 minutes cooled and thrown in the growler. Then I added the yeast and covered with tinfoil. Worked great, batch was bubbling away when I checked on it some 5 1/2 hours later. MPW

tnlandsailor 08-30-2005 02:46 AM

A starter is a always a good idea. When you want to take the next step, try a large flask and a stir plate. The borosilicate flasks can be boiled on the stove and cooled right away in cold water. The closed cell foam stoppers will keep out wild yeast and bacteria. I've found I can make a starter with no sanitizer whatsoever, leaving the stopper in place during the boil. This makes making a starter a snap. A great time saver too.

Prosit!

SwAMi75 08-30-2005 02:51 AM

Yeah, it's no big deal. If they'd get the FAQ's here fixed, we'd already have a nice instructional guide for everyone to follow. :D

andre the giant 09-01-2005 03:40 PM

I made a starter for my Belgian Wit on Thursday of last week. Due to schedule problems, I couldn't brew until Tuesday. By that time, the yeast starter had stopped bubbling and seemed to be settling/going dormant. Boy was I wrong. Even with the delay, I saw serious MAJOR LEAGUE blowoff within 6 hours!!! The blowoff has a nice Wit yeast smell, laced with orange peel and corriander.

I'm brewing my Hefeweizen tonight, Thursday, and the starter will be one week old. I have a feeling that it will be just about as active.

Starters rock!

PT Ray 09-02-2005 01:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tnlandsailor
A starter is a always a good idea. When you want to take the next step, try a large flask and a stir plate. The borosilicate flasks can be boiled on the stove and cooled right away in cold water. The closed cell foam stoppers will keep out wild yeast and bacteria. I've found I can make a starter with no sanitizer whatsoever, leaving the stopper in place during the boil. This makes making a starter a snap. A great time saver too.

Prosit!

The flask is the way to go. I am not fimiliar with a foam stopper, I just used a drilled stopper and plugged the hole with a piece of cotton and covered with a pieceof foil. Before I had a gas range, I would use a bunson burner. Either way, unless I placed a steel screen over the burner to distribute the heat, the glass would get hot spots and cause uncontrollable boil overs.

SwAMi75 09-02-2005 07:06 AM

Quote:

By that time, the yeast starter had stopped bubbling and seemed to be settling/going dormant. Boy was I wrong.
No, you were right. They were dormant. They multiplied, ate up the starter wort and settled, which is what you want. Same principle as pitching onto a yeast slurry, just smaller.

robmee 09-03-2005 09:05 PM

so an erlenmeyer flask can be put right on the stove or should I do it in a small pot first for the boil? And what type of liquid do I put in the airlock?

robmee 09-04-2005 12:13 AM

I figured it out...I just hope the yeast wasn't spoiled from the hurricane

cap46 09-05-2005 05:10 AM

Have'nt Really Done A Yeast Starter Before . I Use Wyeast And Have Always Had Good Luck. How Long Will Yeast Starter Last And Also How Long Before Brew Do You Start It.

Toilet Rocker 09-06-2005 01:58 AM

I began my starter (WL European Ale Yeast) on Thursday and saw minimal action. Tiny Krausen in the flask. Pitched 10PM Saturday night at midnite into my wheat beer. By 10AM this AM, I had 1 bubble/3 sec. By 4 PM, I have 5 bubbles/2 secs. NICE! Starters rock.


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