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Old 07-03-2010, 09:37 PM   #1
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Default Would a Diacetyl-Rest be Proper? Help Appreciated!

Hello everyone -- let me just cut this short by explaining I had just started a Roasted Brown Ale concoction (if it can't even be classified as such), with 22% Roasted Barley, 22% Munich Malt, 14% Flaked Oats, 12% Maple Syrup, 11% Toasted Malt, 11% Dextrose, 7% Brown Sugar, and 6% Coffee Malt. It's been in primary (carboy) for a little over five days now; I've been checking on it every so often, but not enough to actually let in so much light it would be ruined weeks before the racking and bottling steps of the process. Upon one of my checks, I could smell the undeniable presence of diacetyl in the fermenting beer in the carboy. I think I'll let it sit for a few days longer, but I've never actually done a diacetyl-rest before so I was thinking if it was mandatory for my predicament at the moment. There's definitely a butter/caramelized popcorn sensation when I go in for a sniff, but I've never had the trouble of trying to get rid of the stuff in any of my previous batches so I'm a little inexperienced with this procedure. I believe if it's an ale you're brewing, and after a certain amount of time has passed, and after a few tests to make sure it is in fact "dicaetylized", to pour the beer in back in the brew kettle/cooking pot and heat it to ~60 F/~15 C and let it it sit for 24-72 hours -- correct? There is also the possibility of lagering the beer, but honestly I'm going for more a fruitier, nuttier beer so if I were to lager it, most of these flavors may very well get destroyed in the process. So, very simply, what should I do? All my previous batches never had a diacetyl smell to them, so I'm going to need a little help. THANKS!!!

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Old 07-03-2010, 10:20 PM   #2
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Don't worry about diacetyl. All you will taste is roasted barley.

Never pour beer unless it's into a glass to drink.

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Old 07-03-2010, 10:34 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by 944play View Post
Don't worry about diacetyl. All you will taste is roasted barley.

Never pour beer unless it's into a glass to drink.
Okay. So just be patient and after its designated amount of time for primary, rack to secondary and then go from there? I guess patience really is a virtue, then. But could you maybe explain/be a little more specific on why I shouldn't worry about the diacetyl?

Just curious, have you done a diacetyl-rest before, and if so, was it necessary?

Thanks.

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Old 07-04-2010, 12:55 AM   #4
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I do a d-rest on lagers just because it's easier than not on my system.

With 22% of the grist as RB, you aren't going to taste anything else.

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Old 07-04-2010, 02:43 AM   #5
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First off, welcome!!

Second, the brew's only been fermenting for 5 days. Leave it alone.

You have maple syrup and brown sugar in there that's going to take a little longer to ferment out.

Most brewers who do a D-rest take their brews out of a cold chamber and let the brew come to room temperature for 24 to 48 hours so the yeast can become more active and clean up after itself.

In effect you are already doing a D-rest at room temps.

Since you are tasting the butter flavor already let it sit another week or so while the yeast cleans up after itself (absorbs the diacetyl) and completes fermenting.

I kegged (and carbonated) a brew that later acquired diacetyl (butter flavor). I took the keg out of the keezer, de-pressurized it, opened it, poured in 1/4 packet of dry yeast, replaced the pressure relief valve with a small length of tuging and an airlock then let it sit in the garage for a week. When I came back I took a sample and the butter flavor was all gone.

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Old 07-04-2010, 02:56 PM   #6
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What temperature are you fermenting at that you would need to heat it to get to 60 degrees? Or were you just trying to explain what you think a d-rest is to make sure you have it right?

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Old 07-04-2010, 07:04 PM   #7
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What temperature are you fermenting at that you would need to heat it to get to 60 degrees? Or were you just trying to explain what you think a d-rest is to make sure you have it right?
Yeah, I was a little confused on how it worked is all; it's been fermenting at room temperature (~72 degrees °F) for six days. As I said, my previous batches didn't include a diacetyl smell to them so I had no idea what I should do about it. I guess I'll take the advise of my senior Brewtalk brethren and just wait a tad longer and see what happens. Thanks, mates -- you guys rule!!!

I shall update the turnout.
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Old 07-08-2010, 03:03 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by homebrewer_99 View Post
First off, welcome!!

Second, the brew's only been fermenting for 5 days. Leave it alone.

You have maple syrup and brown sugar in there that's going to take a little longer to ferment out.

Most brewers who do a D-rest take their brews out of a cold chamber and let the brew come to room temperature for 24 to 48 hours so the yeast can become more active and clean up after itself.

In effect you are already doing a D-rest at room temps.

Since you are tasting the butter flavor already let it sit another week or so while the yeast cleans up after itself (absorbs the diacetyl) and completes fermenting.

I kegged (and carbonated) a brew that later acquired diacetyl (butter flavor). I took the keg out of the keezer, de-pressurized it, opened it, poured in 1/4 packet of dry yeast, replaced the pressure relief valve with a small length of tuging and an airlock then let it sit in the garage for a week. When I came back I took a sample and the butter flavor was all gone.
Yeah, on the 9th day (yesterday) I did a test by racking a very small amount of the beer from the carboy into a snifter and took a sip. The buttery flavor is really strong, so I put the carboy back in my closet and lowered the temperature a bit. I'll wait about the same amount of time before I pull it out again. Thanks for the advice, though!
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Old 07-08-2010, 03:20 PM   #9
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You may have to add a bit (1/4 packet) more fresh yeast. I usd Nottingham with success to remove the diacetyl flavor.

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Old 07-08-2010, 03:35 PM   #10
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I have a feeling you'll have bigger taste issues in this batch than just diacetyl...

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