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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Wood for mash paddle?
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Old 06-02-2013, 04:17 AM   #1
canfield30
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Default Wood for mash paddle?

Would aspen or poplar be okay for a mash paddle? Not sure what wood works. Cant find maple but dic find these boards.

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Old 06-02-2013, 04:24 AM   #2
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Poplar is pretty easy to ding and whatnot. It's technically a hardwood, but it's pretty soft, so durability might be a concern.

That being said, I don't see why you couldn't use poplar or aspen as long as you handle them well.

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Old 06-02-2013, 04:28 AM   #3
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Thanks for the response. Wasnt sure if the wood matters . Regarding sugars and affecting the mash. Gotta make a mash paddle now. 2nd all grain session wednesday.

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Old 06-02-2013, 04:34 AM   #4
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When I first started brewing all grain I didn't know I needed a paddle until I needed a paddle, and grabbed the first thing I could use; an old yellow pine bed slat. I started carving and removed everything that didn't look like a paddle and Voila' I had a paddle.

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Old 06-02-2013, 04:39 AM   #5
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I made mine out of poplar. It is plenty hard enough to mash in a cooler or stir in a keggle. I have used it in many, many batches for over a year and it looks pretty much like it did when I made it. It's not discolored by the mash or anything like that.

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Old 06-02-2013, 04:39 AM   #6
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The wood itself really isn't that critical, unless you use something like purpleheart that is toxic.

Just start with a nice, sturdy board and sand it well, and you'll be golden.

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Old 06-02-2013, 05:02 AM   #7
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Someone said something about closed grain hardwoods, so I made mine out of Oak. But who knows

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Old 06-02-2013, 05:15 AM   #8
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I made mine from maple. It's fine-grained and inert. Maple often used for cutting boards and laminated butcher blocks, so it would work well for a mash paddle. Aspen and poplar should be OK. Although they are softer woods, they should do fine unless you plan to use it for a baseball bat.

Don't bother putting any oil finish on it, like mineral oil. The first time you use it, the hot water will leach it all out. And don't put on a topcoat, such as polyurethane, as that could contaminate your beer.

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Old 06-02-2013, 05:34 AM   #9
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Thanks all. Looks like mine will be oak. Thats why i love hbt. Always someone to help. Surly abrasive clone in the works.

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Old 06-02-2013, 12:59 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brplatz View Post
Someone said something about closed grain hardwoods, so I made mine out of Oak. But who knows
Sorry to mention it but oak is an open grain hardwood. You really wanted maple or birch. With that said, I suspect your oak paddle will be fine and last for generations.
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