New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Very odd question: reheating fermented beer




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-19-2007, 01:28 PM   #1
cubbies
Tastes like butterdirt
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cubbies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: St Louis MO
Posts: 1,923
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default Very odd question: reheating fermented beer

Here is my story. I brewed a stout a couple of weeks ago. I did a step infusion in my kettle and my last step I left the friggin burner on

Anywho, my mash spent a good amount of time in the 170+ range and thus had a lot of unfermentable sugar. Fermentation died out at 1.030, down from 1.056. I have read about adding enzymes to the wort to break down the complex sugars and get fermentation going again, so I bought some Amylase Enzyme from AHS. Added this to my wort last night and within a couple of hours, fermentation had taken off again.

This is all well and good, however, I have heard through my perusing that when adding enzymes like this, it is possible for the enzymes to completely break down all the complex sugars and end up with FG around, or even below, 1.000. Obviously this is not something I want, especially on a beer like a stout.

So, I was thinking about how to stop the enzymes in their track once I get to a SG that I am comfortable with. The only thing that I can think of is to raise the temperature of the wort to 165ish and let the enzymes break down. What kind of risks am I taking doing this approach? Obviously I will be killing my yeast. I do keg, but I think I am going to bottle this batch. So, as long as I add yeast when i add my priming sugar, that should take care of that. Is there any other potential risks that I am overlooking?



__________________
cubbies is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-19-2007, 01:36 PM   #2
Evan!
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Evan!'s Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 11,901
Liked 62 Times on 56 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I would NOT heat it. You will almost certainly evaporate most of the hop flavor/aroma, and risk boiling off the alcohol is you reach 171f. What I would do is add campden tablets to kill the yeast that are in there and arrest fermentation. Campden tablets finish their work in about 24 hours, but I'd wait longer. Then, when you bottle, you just add back a bunch of rehydrated dry yeast.

But I still doubt that amylase will bring your SG down that low. So just wait and see...check your gravity often.



__________________
MOSS HOLLOW BREWING CO.
Aristocratic Ales, Lascivious Lagers


.planned:
•Scottish 80/- •Sweet Stout •Roggenbier
.primary | bright:
98: Moss Hollow Soured '09 72: Oude Kriek 99: B-Weisse 102: Brett'd BDSA 104: Feat of Strength Helles Bock 105: Merkin Brown
.on tap | kegged:
XX: Moss Hollow Springs Sparkling Water 95: Gott Mit Uns German Pils 91b: Brown Willie's Oaked Abbey Ale 103: Merkin Stout
98: Yorkshire Special 100: Maple Porter 89: Cidre Saison 101: Steffiweizen '09 (#3)
Evan! is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-19-2007, 01:42 PM   #3
cubbies
Tastes like butterdirt
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cubbies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: St Louis MO
Posts: 1,923
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Yes, I do plan on checking it regularly, and as you stated, if it is not a problem then it is not a problem. If it stops at a reasonable gravity, I will just let it be, but I have read that people who have used enzymes on stuck fermentations have had them get too unstuck...or something.

As for the Campden tablets, I have never heard of them. A quick google search makes it look like they are used in wine? How many tabs would you recommend for a 5 gallon batch?

__________________
cubbies is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-19-2007, 01:48 PM   #4
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,650
Liked 130 Times on 124 Posts

Default

The [alpha]-galactosidase in Beano will do exactly what you fear, because it is active at low temperatures. Amylase is less active at room temperatures and at kegger temperatures it basically stops.

I'm in the middle of an experiment using Beano & then heating to de-nature the enzyme. 140F is all it takes. I lost 0.05 Brix in the heating process in one ale and 0 in the other and don't detect any difference in flavor. I now have two soda bottles of re-heated ale sitting on the counter (with new yeast) to see if any more breakdown &| fermentation occurs.

Typically, 1 tablet per gallon, but that only stops the yeast, not the enzyme.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-19-2007, 01:59 PM   #5
cubbies
Tastes like butterdirt
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cubbies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: St Louis MO
Posts: 1,923
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

So, assuming this beer goes below where I want it (or at least is acting that way), if I keg it and let it be, you think the amylase will stop and therefore fermentation will stop. That would certainly be easier and less risky. And since I got two more kegs on the way, it wouldn't be problem with taking up valuable keg space

__________________

Last edited by cubbies; 10-19-2007 at 02:03 PM.
cubbies is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-19-2007, 03:42 PM   #6
malkore
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
malkore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 6,922
Liked 32 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

anything over 170F can start extracting tannins from the grains. tannin 'astringent' flavor doesn't age out over time.

__________________
Malkore
Primary: English Mild
On tap: Pale Ale, Lancelot's Wheat, English Brown Ale, Steam Beer, HoovNuts IPA
Bottled: MOAM, Braggot, Raspberry Melomel, Merlot, Apfelwein, Pyment, Sweet mead, Cabernet
Gal in 2009: 27, Gal in 2010: 34, Gal in 2011: 13, Gal in 2012: 10
malkore is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-19-2007, 05:50 PM   #7
cubbies
Tastes like butterdirt
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cubbies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: St Louis MO
Posts: 1,923
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by malkore
anything over 170F can start extracting tannins from the grains. tannin 'astringent' flavor doesn't age out over time.
Well aware of that. I had zero intention of leaving the burner on. Just one of those things. However, I always taste my hydrometer samplings, and I have tasted nothing that would be described as an off flavor and especially not astringent. It was just really sweet, as you would expect 1.030 beer to be.
__________________
cubbies is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-20-2007, 02:29 PM   #8
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,650
Liked 130 Times on 124 Posts

Default

I neglected to add that alpha amylase also has a de-branching limit, so you'll always have some of the larger malt chains around.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-22-2007, 01:00 PM   #9
cubbies
Tastes like butterdirt
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cubbies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: St Louis MO
Posts: 1,923
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
I neglected to add that alpha amylase also has a de-branching limit, so you'll always have some of the larger malt chains around.

That's good to know. Thanks for the info and all the other previous help. As of last night, it still had a nice little krausen on it and was down to 1.021. I am starting to believe that I am going to be able to save this beer. Thanks again.


__________________
cubbies is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The taste of 2 day fermented beer DogFlynnHead Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 08-26-2009 04:09 AM
fermented root beer? Movinfr8 General Techniques 6 03-14-2008 05:23 AM
Fully fermented question Reno Homebrewer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 01-29-2008 04:33 PM
ABV ? adding liquor to fermented beer left field brewer General Techniques 27 11-08-2007 02:11 AM
reheating fermented wort to kill possible infection? tandpbrewing General Techniques 6 11-02-2007 01:14 AM