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Old 02-27-2013, 04:53 AM   #1
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Default Using roasted malts for clarity.

Hey Ya'll, who uses small amounts of roasted malts in their lighter ales for clarification as I've read many breweries do and as friends have suggested? If so, which and when and if so inclined...why?

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Old 02-27-2013, 06:56 PM   #2
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I've never heard of this technique. What is the mechanism?

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Old 02-27-2013, 07:10 PM   #3
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Not me. No way in heck I'll put roasted grains in my grainbill for a light beer. It would mess with my mash pH, mess with my additions, and possibly add a roasted finish to my beers.

But I'm curious- why would this work? Unless it was to reduce the pH?

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Old 02-27-2013, 11:54 PM   #4
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I was told the small amount of roasted malt gets added at the end of the boil.

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Old 02-28-2013, 12:21 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sawbossFogg View Post
I was told the small amount of roasted malt gets added at the end of the boil.
That doesn't seem right. Maybe it could be added for the sparge, but at the end of the boil would be very strange.
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Old 02-28-2013, 01:32 AM   #6
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I'm very curious myself!

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Old 02-28-2013, 03:07 PM   #7
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Sounds like it might have been an "Oh crap, no Irish moss" moment and an improvisation was made. I suspect anything that with a lot of surface area, and surface charges on it will help with clumping of hot break and improve clarity. I'd be a bit concerned about adding contamination with using a grain, although roasted would have less risk

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Old 02-28-2013, 06:20 PM   #8
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I posted a thread on this a while ago, but didn't get any good advice here. People do use this trick though as I see it thrown into recipes periodically.

I was reading in Papazian's Homebrewer's Companion and ran across an interesting tip. He states the following.

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Here’s a little gem that will help reduce chill haze and reduce some harshness: Add about 1 ounce (28 g.) of finely crushed black malt to your light beers at the end of the mash.
He then expands on the point with a little narrative.

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The addition will not affect color significantly but will adsorb some of the polyphenols, tannins and long-chained proteins that cause chill haze and astringent character in beers. Some of the largest brewing companies in the United States use this method for some of the lightest of their beers. You may have already noticed that chill haze is less of a problem—even nonexistent—in dark beers. Aha.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:44 PM   #9
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Something similar has turned up at http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/ in a number of historic recipes. As small (less than 1/2 oz for 5 gallons) portion of black malt is ground and added, but to the kettle ("copper" in the terminology of the day) and boiled.

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2...ushers-ip.html

"You’ll notice the black malt. Yes, you are correct! However, don’t you go throwing that in the mash. No sir! That goes directly in the boil kettle! Yes, I said that correctly. Right in the boil kettle. I find that if I micronize it (aka stick it into a coffee mill and destroy it) I get much better extraction, flavor and it drops like a rock in the hot break and subsequent whirlpool. Also, if you remember, Barclay Perkins did the same for a lot of their stouts. I’ve received numerous emails with numerous theories of why this is a bad idea. None of them make scientific sense. Give it a shot, you won’t be sorry."

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Old 03-01-2013, 12:01 AM   #10
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Awesome, interesting technique. I may try it out. Any other examples, particularly of big breweries doing this, as Charlie P mentions?

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