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Old 12-14-2010, 11:17 PM   #41
madavis25
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I know this is an old thread, but what about using olive oil and pitching more yeast to a stuck fermentation?

You can't reaerate after partial fermentation because of oxidation issues. People haven't had great success just pitching another package of yeast because there isn't enough cells and there is no O2 left for exponential growth.

If you pitch another package and add olive oil, or make another starter to which you have added olive oil, then you should be able to get another growth phase and cure a stuck fermentation, no?

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Old 12-14-2010, 11:33 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madavis25 View Post
I know this is an old thread, but what about using olive oil and pitching more yeast to a stuck fermentation?

You can't reaerate after partial fermentation because of oxidation issues. People haven't had great success just pitching another package of yeast because there isn't enough cells and there is no O2 left for exponential growth.

If you pitch another package and add olive oil, or make another starter to which you have added olive oil, then you should be able to get another growth phase and cure a stuck fermentation, no?
Maybe, I havent had a stuck fermentation in more than 6 or 7 years so I cant speak to that specifically. I have been using a tiny amount of Olive oil in my starters instead of 02 for about 20 brews though, and so far they have been great.
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Old 12-15-2010, 02:52 AM   #43
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I've done it with almost all my batches and when i have forgotten, I notice a much "Lighter" fermentation. My friend that got me into homebrewing turned me onto this

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Old 12-15-2010, 03:54 AM   #44
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I have had one batch of Scottish Ale Wee Heavy which was about 1.70 but finished out at a VERY high 1.055. No matter what I tried, I could not get the yeast to start back up. I ended up pouring water into the finished beer to obtain a FG of 1.015 but obviously this is not the correct way to do it.

I was just watching Brewmasters on Discovery Channel with Dogfish Head and Sam C. just showed an entire 120 IPA batch go down the drain for the EXACT same reason. No matter what, they couldn't get the yeast to start again. It cost them over $500,000 in lost sales (yes, they are insured) but I feel the pain.

A lot goes into a brew and I have been VERY successful with nearly every brew I have done. I have NEVER had a failure on the Scottish Wee Heavy but for some reason I just could NOT get it to ferment again. Yes, I tried everything to include a micro drop of Olive oil and even injecting pure O2.

In the end the brew was okay but not something to be real proud of. Next time I am going to use a better starter and probably some yeast nutrient and watch the batch MUCH more closely.

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Old 12-15-2010, 04:16 AM   #45
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I have heard of topping off with olive oil to prevent oxidation. Wine and oil are immiscible and the oil floats on top of the wine. The oil layer prevents contact between oxygen in the air and the wine.

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Old 12-15-2010, 05:14 AM   #46
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Interesting, I have never heard of this. So when adding the amount of oilve oil, when would it be added ? During the boil, or just when the yeast is added ?

This did get me thinking of its use in meads. Has anyone ever used it with sucess in meads? Head rentention does not matter with a mead

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Old 12-15-2010, 02:05 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by JewBrew View Post
I have heard of topping off with olive oil to prevent oxidation. Wine and oil are immiscible and the oil floats on top of the wine. The oil layer prevents contact between oxygen in the air and the wine.
This tid bit of ingeniousness I have never heard!
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Old 12-16-2010, 04:26 AM   #48
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I have had similar experiences as azingsheim with much lighter fermentations without olive oil (I forgot)

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Old 12-16-2010, 05:02 PM   #49
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I have heard of topping off with olive oil to prevent oxidation. Wine and oil are immiscible and the oil floats on top of the wine. The oil layer prevents contact between oxygen in the air and the wine.
that sounds crazy. good bye head retention i would rather add a layer of whole hops to prevent oxidation than using expensive olive oil. the amount of olive oil you need for the O2 replacement is much less than a single drop.
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Old 01-22-2011, 12:36 PM   #50
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that sounds crazy. good bye head retention i would rather add a layer of whole hops to prevent oxidation than using expensive olive oil. the amount of olive oil you need for the O2 replacement is much less than a single drop.
Wouldnt you only need enough to create a very thin layer of oil on top of the wine/beer?

I do agree with you that I would not be surprised to see no head on the beer.
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