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Old 10-22-2008, 05:06 PM   #31
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... Oxygen is a medical gas. How do y'all get your O2 bottles? Where do you get them filled? Is the stuff from welding supply houses the same?
Someone on the local (Omaha) craigslist is selling oxygen concentrators (with too many hours for medical use) for $75. They push out 94% pure oxy. Otherwise, like the others said, the little red cylinder from the hardware store.


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Old 10-22-2008, 06:46 PM   #32
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I am not as experienced as most on forum, but I have used the smallest drop of OO in my starter. I think there was an article in Home Brew magazine that suggested using a very thin wire and barely coating it with OO. I tried it and had a great fermentation and no loss of head retention. My thought was, I only aerate wort by shaking, so why not help fermentation along with OO. What the heck give it a try.



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Old 01-14-2010, 11:59 PM   #33
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I know this is an old thread, but I have been adding .03ml OO to 5 gallons of cooled wort. I have found no ill-effects of such a small amount. In fact, my oatmeal stout has great head retention. I don't really have a scientific method to test the actual oxygen that is produced with and without OO. I use extra virgin organic expeller pressed, if that makes any difference. Anyway, that small amount does NOTHING to the flavor or head retention of any of my beers. So, there.

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Old 01-15-2010, 02:06 PM   #34
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... I don't really have a scientific method to test the actual oxygen that is produced with and without OO. ...
IIRC it is not that the OO causes production of oxygen but that the yeast use the oxygen to produce fatty acids which, if you provide the fatty acids via OO then yeast don't need the oxygen, or something like that. At any rate I think the small amount your using is even less than what New Belgium use in their experiment. One estimate I read was that New Belgium used the equivalent of .06ml in their yeast starter.

At any rate if it works for you rock on.
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:43 PM   #35
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Was there any reason (other than fear of no head retention) that New Belgium used so little olive oil? We seem to be taking their numbers as gospel, when the experiments (and calculations) seem to indicate that the yeast isn't getting enough.

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Old 01-15-2010, 03:09 PM   #36
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It was a long time ago when I read the original story. I think Grady Hull's thesis (it was for his MSc in Brewing and Distilling) is online if you want real details.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/thesis-olive-oil-aeration-method-57627/

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Old 01-15-2010, 03:44 PM   #37
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Next time I see a 1 uL pipette for sale, I'll pick it up. Given the numbers from the article, 1 uL would even be too much, but much better than a 'drop'. I'm a firm believer that having a well aerated, full sized starter for the beer you are brewing is the most important thing a homebrewer can do. If you grow the majority of the yeast before you pitch, you don't need much oxygen in the wort to bring the numbers up and get fermentation under way. I'd like to do some empirical tests on this at some point soon; probably do a full batch, split it in half and aerate the hell out of one and not at all the other, then pitch half of a full sized starter made on a stirplate (gives excellent oxygenation!) in each.

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Old 01-15-2010, 04:37 PM   #38
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Germlyn1,

Lightbulb!

I now use an almost immeasurably small amount in my brews. I dampen a q-tip with OO and just touch the tips of a few threads of my brew pot hop stopper before I assemble the fittings. (Stops the horrible squeal when I tighten it as well.)

Your starter comment made me realize another opportunity. I brew up and pressure can my starter wort. I am going to start adding perhaps a measurable amount (a drop for 6 gallons?) to that wort. I decant my finished starters anyway, so if there is excess OO, most will be discarded.

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Old 01-15-2010, 05:32 PM   #39
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Subscribed. I am following this article with much interest.

Though a bit off topic, I've had some anecdotal experiences with yeast and olive oil. I make my own breads and doughs and have noticed that if I add too much olive oil to my dough, the yeast suffocates and never reaches it's full potential, likewise if added too early to a dough, the dough never takes on the complexity and character that's most desirable after proofing. However, as most bakers will tell you--it's almost impossible to have good character to your dough without some form of oil added AFTER the yeast has had a chance to come to life. I find the 'ester-in-lieu-of oxygen' part rather intriguing.

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Old 01-15-2010, 07:23 PM   #40
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Germlyn1,

Lightbulb!

I now use an almost immeasurably small amount in my brews. I dampen a q-tip with OO and just touch the tips of a few threads of my brew pot hop stopper before I assemble the fittings. (Stops the horrible squeal when I tighten it as well.)

Your starter comment made me realize another opportunity. I brew up and pressure can my starter wort. I am going to start adding perhaps a measurable amount (a drop for 6 gallons?) to that wort. I decant my finished starters anyway, so if there is excess OO, most will be discarded.
I was actually starting to think along the same lines, though I was going more for adding a drop to a 1L culture, which I would then harvest into test tubes for storage. Same principle though...


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