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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Using Olive oil instead of Oxygen
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:38 AM   #161
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Actually, it doesn't make sense to me. If I was going to do it, I'd choose a really neutral yeast so it wouldn't interfere with what I was testing.
Hmm....

My thoughts were that the changes would be more noticeable with this yeast, but I see your point.

What style of beer, OG, and yeast would you think is best suited for a test like this? Likely, I'd choose US-05 for my test if I was to follow your logic on the yeast.

Maybe a Pale Ale in the 1.040-1.050 range.
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Old 12-05-2012, 01:13 AM   #162
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Yeah, I think that's what I'd do. Keep it under 40 IBU. I prefer 1056 to 05, but that's personal preference. 05 should be fine and if you get 2 packs from the same lot number you could be pretty certain of approximately equal viability. That's what I did for my FWH experiment. You want to do everythg you can to limit the variables to just what you're trying to find out.

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Old 12-05-2012, 01:22 AM   #163
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If your planning on using US-05 there's the other issue that dry yeast supposedly doesnt even need any oxygen. I say go with 1056 liquid. Or I guess you could use a US-05 cake.

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Old 12-05-2012, 01:24 AM   #164
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Agreed. I'll probably go with #3. However, this is more for me and my preferences. I don't really care to get too detailed/specific or scientific (Very anecdotal).

My goal here was to potentially find a way to produce rather large batches (10+ gallons) without a special aeration system. If I am convinced that the OO method works without having to go out of my way to aerate, then I will feel successful.

Now, if the beer has a significant change in flavor/aroma (Desirable or not), I will at least have first hand experience of the differentiation of results for OO and Aeration.

I chose a hef as my first beer for this test due to the fact that the esters and character of the yeast are so dependent on the environment you give it (Specifically with Wyeast 3068).

If I were to have chosen US-05 / Chico, I would expect the yeast to be far more tolerent and affect the outcome of flavor/esters to a lesser degree.

Does that make sense?
Honestly I was going to say to do whatever would be closest to your normal brewing practices Im not all for the scientific procedures.
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Old 12-05-2012, 01:32 AM   #165
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If your planning on using US-05 there's the other issue that dry yeast supposedly doesnt even need any oxygen. I say go with 1056 liquid. Or I guess you could use a US-05 cake.
Another good point. It'll be another week or two until I get around to this, but currently planning.

I'll post everything I've done on brew day. However, I'm sure I'll have some more posts in the meantime.
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:58 PM   #166
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not to put a damper on the scientific method... but most of us are probably not scientists first and homebrewer second. The ultimate goal is making beer (no?)

So I would see the main question not as "How efficient does OO replace oxygenation and what are the byproducts/effects?" but rather "How does adding OO instead of oxygen right before fermentation affect the quality of the beer I make" - the second question doesn't really care that you oxygenated/aerated your starter - if that's what you do, that's what you do...

Also, I think it should be compared against real oxygenation (e.g., pure oxygen at proper levels) as opposed to just shaking...

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Old 12-05-2012, 05:03 PM   #167
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The goal of improving flavor stability was achieved but at the cost of increased esters and slightly slower fermentations.
- The last sentence of the conclusion of the original 2005 thesis.

Interesting comment, aaronbeach. It seems the original question was answered in 2005. Discounting the hysteria and nonsense what remains?

The salient question is “Is it worthwhile to supplement our starters with olive oil?”

For myself, the answer is “Why not?” I don’t think it’s possible for my yeast to be too healthy and happy.
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Old 12-05-2012, 05:14 PM   #168
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For me, the answer is "Why bother?". But we all get to answer the question for ourselves.

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Old 12-05-2012, 07:01 PM   #169
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Really, Denny? If you find it too much trouble to pour a couple drops of olive oil, how do you ever get off the couch?

Quote:
Oxidative Effects of Wort Aeration
Previously conducted research has shown that wort aeration causes oxidative reactions to occur in the wort, which form the precursors to beer staling compounds (Burkert, 2004). It is widely understood that minimizing the exposure of beer or wort to oxygen will improve the finished product’s resistance to oxidation. During knock out it is traditional practice to completely saturate the wort with air or oxygen, intentionally dissolving 8 to 10 ppm oxygen into the liquid. The yeast takes up the oxygen very quickly after wort aeration but the oxidative reactions also take place very quickly. Even though wort aeration is a universally excepted practice it seems very logical that eliminating this step would be a significant improvement on the final beer’s resistance to oxidation. Therefore it makes sense that reducing the product’s exposure to oxygen would improve its flavor stability.
- from Grady Hull’s 2005 thesis

So, to answer your question, better beer. I really don’t see a down side.

As for dry yeast, I don’t think the oil would do a thing. They say there is enough lipid in the dry yeast to multiply three times. Same reason you don’t need to oxygenate the wort with dry yeast.
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:06 PM   #170
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Before I take an action, I like to know it's going to provide me a benefit. Part of my pragmatic way of brewing. If there was actual proof that I'd get a better beer, I'd do it. But it hasn't been proven to my satisfaction.

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