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Old 05-01-2008, 10:51 PM   #1
Bruiz54
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Default A technique Question - fermentation temps

Ok so we all know that different strains of yeats have a"optimal tempeture" but of course with multiple batches going you can only have one temp set on your fridge. Of course Ales have their temp ranges and so do lagers, however here is the question: Do you guys perfer cooler temps, higher temps or a tmep that falls in the middle of the range for fermenting? For example I like around 60 deg for my ales. i feel that alower slower fermentation will do more for the beer. Of course I do not have any science to back me up I just feel it is a good idea. So anyone want to pitch in their two cents. thanks and as always happy brewing

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Old 05-01-2008, 10:57 PM   #2
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I think this depends on what strain of yeast you are using and what your final goal is. For instance, I will ferment my kolsch at ~65 to get that crisp dry characteristic, but I will allow wheats to creep up over 70 to get a little fruity overtone to the beer.

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Old 05-01-2008, 11:01 PM   #3
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I like the kolsch yeast and ferment it around 62... but any yeast I've used I've always gone towards the cooler side as that will typically give you the "cleaner" taste which I prefer. But as was mentioned, it all depends on what you are after.

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Old 05-02-2008, 01:01 AM   #4
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My house is generally pretty cold- so it's good that I happen to like my ales fermented at the cold range of their optimum temperatures! I ferment almost all of my lagers at 50 degrees, and almost all of my ales at 60-66 depending on the yeast strain. Except in the case of Belgians, I like the cleaner taste. My Belgian was fermented cool, also, but still has the nice fruitiness of a Belgian.

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Old 05-02-2008, 01:12 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew
My house is generally pretty cold- so it's good that I happen to like my ales fermented at the cold range of their optimum temperatures! I ferment almost all of my lagers at 50 degrees, and almost all of my ales at 60-66 depending on the yeast strain. Except in the case of Belgians, I like the cleaner taste. My Belgian was fermented cool, also, but still has the nice fruitiness of a Belgian.
I'm at the opposite end....My fermentation temps are at the higher range of what they should be. I'm typically around 68-70, which is borderline too warm. But, I'm living in a rental house for now, so I can't make any modifications to it. If I'd quit spending money on other stuff, I'd probably have enough money to build some type of fermentation chamber Of course I'm happy with the way my beers are turning out, so I'm not going to lose any sleep over it.

As with most other aspects of brewing, all that matters is that you're happy with the final product!!
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Old 05-02-2008, 01:13 AM   #6
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I tend to go warmer for ales, like 65º - 68º. I really like the fruity esters that come from those temps, especially in English style brews.

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Old 05-02-2008, 01:56 AM   #7
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I think Jamil in one of his podcasts stated he would want temperature control before moving up to a full wort boil, AG, conical etc. The take home message: temp control is key in reproducing a quality, consistent beer. Like Beerthoven I brew my English style beers at 68F, now if it was an APA with Wyeast 1056 you could get away with a cooler fermentation temperature.

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Old 05-02-2008, 02:09 AM   #8
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i tend to go on the low end of the range for almost all my beers. when i use nottingham, i ferment around 60F, wheat beers are in the low 60s, belgians start in the low 60s and rise into the 70s over time.

the ales i don't regulate can be anywhere from 65-75F, depending on weather. they usually maintain around 70F in my closet.

i have yet to do a lager i've made lots of steam beers and cream ales, tho always around 60F

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Old 05-02-2008, 02:45 AM   #9
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I also like ales fermented around 68-70F, but I like my lagers fermented around 50-52. I might ferment with the Koelsch yeast anywhere from 62-70F, depending on the beer.


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