Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Suggestions for my brew process?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-07-2013, 11:02 PM   #1
seanppp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 258
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default Suggestions for my brew process?

I posted my process up here a while ago but it has changed quite a bit so I want to see if anyone has any suggestions/criticism/additions to my brewing process. Thanks!

Note: My "lauter tun" is a pot that fits inside my brew pot and has holes drilled on the bottom of it to allow water to drain out the bottom.

BREW DAY
1. The golden rule of brewing: Don't be lazy with sanitizing!
2. Set lauter tun in brew pot, then slowly fill with 4½ gallons carbon filtered water. Place on burner and bring to the strike temperature needed for a 154°F mash.
3. When water reaches strike temperature, mix in gypsum salt and calcium chloride, then add full mash grains into lauter tun, cover brew pot with lid and towel, and let rest for 60 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.
4. Mix 20 minute mash grains into the brew pot and continue mashing for 20 minutes, stirring 10 minutes in.
5. Meanwhile, slowly fill 3 gallon pot with 1½ gallons carbon filtered water (this’ll be the sparge water) and bring to 175°F by the end of the mashing in step 4. Mix gypsum salt and calcium chloride once it is warm.
6. Remove towel from brew pot, then heat mash to 170°F (not exceeding 3°F/minute). Return towel and let rest for 5 minutes.
7. Slowly lift lauter tun above mash, allowing mash to drain out of the grains. When mash stops dripping, scoop grains into sparge water, mix, and let sit for 15 minutes, stirring often. With the lauter tun still above the mash level in the brewpot, pour the sparge water through the lauter tun into the brewpot. When water stops dripping, remove the lauter tun and grains.
8. Bring mash to a boil, then add 90 minute hops. Boil aggressively for 90 minutes.
20 minutes before end of boil, add Worfloc.
15 minutes before end of boil, place wort chiller in the brew pot.
5 minutes before end of boil, add the 5 minute hops.
9. At the end of the boil, turn off the flame, add the flameout hops, and mix for 20 seconds. Let sit, uncovered, for 5 minutes.
10. Cool wort to 175°F, add sub-isomeriziation hops, and mix continuously for 3 minutes. Let sit, uncovered, for 40 minutes.
11. Fish out as much of the hops as possible with the stainless steel strainer, then cool wort to ~70°F.
12. Remove wort chiller. Place brew pot 3 feet off the floor and mix vigorously for 60 seconds to create a whirlpool. Cover the brew pot and let rest for 30 minutes. This should create a cone of trub at the middle of the bottom of the brew pot.
13. Transfer wort to the primary fermenter with the racking cane:
Start at the top of the wort and slowly work down at the side of the brew pot, avoiding the trub cone. Hold the end of the racking cane at the top of the primary fermenter to allow it to aerate as much as possible. Pitch yeast into the primary fermenter half way through the transferring process.
14. Place lid, stopper, and stopper plug tightly on the primary fermenter. Shake the primary fermenter vigorously for 4 minutes.
15. Place airlock in place of the stopper plug.
Place primary fermenter
a) in a small insulated space with a heater set to 60oF (when ambient temperature is below 60oF)
b) in a non-insulated space, in the 8 gallon brew pot filled with water, and a towel half in/half out of the pot (when ambient temp is above 60°F.
16. After the airlock has stopped bubbling, rack to secondary (6-7 days after brewing).

SECONDARY (Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation!)
1. Place primary fermenter 3 feet off the floor, cover with a towel to avoid light exposure, and let sit for >2 hours (to settle out any trub).
2. Attach hose to nozzle and fill secondary fermenter (at the bottom to avoid oxidation). Leave behind trub in primary fermenter.
3. Place stopper and airlock atop secondary fermenter and return to the fermentation space.
4. When haze drops to the bottom of the secondary fermenter, the beer is ready to bottle (~10-16 days)*.

BOTTLING (Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation!)
1. Boil 2 cups carbon filtered water in a small saucepan, add corn sugar and mix until dissolved. Fill the larger saucepan with cold water and then place the small saucepan inside to cool for 5 minutes.
2. Place secondary fermenter 3 feet off the ground, then pour in sugar water and gently mix with the racking cane (avoiding aeration but mixing sufficiently). Return airlock, cover with a towel to avoid light exposure, to and let sit for 1 hour (to settle out any trub). Cover with a towel to avoid light damage.
Meanwhile, wash bottles in dishwasher (without soap).
3. Boil 2 cups water in a small saucepan, place bottle caps inside for 2 minutes, then strain.
4. Fill racking cane and hose with water. Bend hose at the half-way point, allowing water to drain out the open end.
5. Place racking cane half way into secondary fermenter, then push filler valve down in the bowl until beer reaches the valve.
6. Fill each bottle to the top, allowing the displacement of the bottle filler to bring the beer down to ¾” below the top.
7. Allow bottles to sit for 10 minutes (to allow CO2 production to displace oxygen in the headspace of the bottle), then cap in the order they were filled.
8. Let bottles sit in a dark, room-temperature space for 14 days to carbonate. Once carbonated, keep refrigerated, and drink.

__________________
seanppp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 05:25 AM   #2
seanppp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 258
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Nothing?

__________________
seanppp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 06:54 AM   #3
grathan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 2,069
Liked 131 Times on 100 Posts
Likes Given: 80

Default

Life's too short to read all that. You spend all day writing that?

__________________
grathan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 07:04 AM   #4
DanH
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
DanH's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,025
Liked 82 Times on 64 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I've never heard if pitching yeast halfway through transferring the wort, although I don't think it would hurt.

__________________
DanH is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 07:37 AM   #5
Demus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,227
Liked 157 Times on 128 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I suggest you spend less time writing. This will allow more brewing time!

__________________
Demus is offline
daksin Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 08:10 AM   #6
grathan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 2,069
Liked 131 Times on 100 Posts
Likes Given: 80

Default

You seem worried about oxidation, but your fishing for hops in the hot wort with a strainer post boil.

__________________
grathan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 08:19 AM   #7
vnzjunk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Flint, Mi
Posts: 136
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

I am worn out already and all I did was read the steps not actually do the brewday......or was it 2 brewdays LOL

Sometimes simplification is the key to happiness !

Have fun

Quote:
Originally Posted by seanppp View Post
I posted my process up here a while ago but it has changed quite a bit so I want to see if anyone has any suggestions/criticism/additions to my brewing process. Thanks!

Note: My "lauter tun" is a pot that fits inside my brew pot and has holes drilled on the bottom of it to allow water to drain out the bottom.

BREW DAY
1. The golden rule of brewing: Don't be lazy with sanitizing!
2. Set lauter tun in brew pot, then slowly fill with 4½ gallons carbon filtered water. Place on burner and bring to the strike temperature needed for a 154°F mash.
3. When water reaches strike temperature, mix in gypsum salt and calcium chloride, then add full mash grains into lauter tun, cover brew pot with lid and towel, and let rest for 60 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.
4. Mix 20 minute mash grains into the brew pot and continue mashing for 20 minutes, stirring 10 minutes in.
5. Meanwhile, slowly fill 3 gallon pot with 1½ gallons carbon filtered water (this’ll be the sparge water) and bring to 175°F by the end of the mashing in step 4. Mix gypsum salt and calcium chloride once it is warm.
6. Remove towel from brew pot, then heat mash to 170°F (not exceeding 3°F/minute). Return towel and let rest for 5 minutes.
7. Slowly lift lauter tun above mash, allowing mash to drain out of the grains. When mash stops dripping, scoop grains into sparge water, mix, and let sit for 15 minutes, stirring often. With the lauter tun still above the mash level in the brewpot, pour the sparge water through the lauter tun into the brewpot. When water stops dripping, remove the lauter tun and grains.
8. Bring mash to a boil, then add 90 minute hops. Boil aggressively for 90 minutes.
20 minutes before end of boil, add Worfloc.
15 minutes before end of boil, place wort chiller in the brew pot.
5 minutes before end of boil, add the 5 minute hops.
9. At the end of the boil, turn off the flame, add the flameout hops, and mix for 20 seconds. Let sit, uncovered, for 5 minutes.
10. Cool wort to 175°F, add sub-isomeriziation hops, and mix continuously for 3 minutes. Let sit, uncovered, for 40 minutes.
11. Fish out as much of the hops as possible with the stainless steel strainer, then cool wort to ~70°F.
12. Remove wort chiller. Place brew pot 3 feet off the floor and mix vigorously for 60 seconds to create a whirlpool. Cover the brew pot and let rest for 30 minutes. This should create a cone of trub at the middle of the bottom of the brew pot.
13. Transfer wort to the primary fermenter with the racking cane:
Start at the top of the wort and slowly work down at the side of the brew pot, avoiding the trub cone. Hold the end of the racking cane at the top of the primary fermenter to allow it to aerate as much as possible. Pitch yeast into the primary fermenter half way through the transferring process.
14. Place lid, stopper, and stopper plug tightly on the primary fermenter. Shake the primary fermenter vigorously for 4 minutes.
15. Place airlock in place of the stopper plug.
Place primary fermenter
a) in a small insulated space with a heater set to 60oF (when ambient temperature is below 60oF)
b) in a non-insulated space, in the 8 gallon brew pot filled with water, and a towel half in/half out of the pot (when ambient temp is above 60°F.
16. After the airlock has stopped bubbling, rack to secondary (6-7 days after brewing).

SECONDARY (Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation!)
1. Place primary fermenter 3 feet off the floor, cover with a towel to avoid light exposure, and let sit for >2 hours (to settle out any trub).
2. Attach hose to nozzle and fill secondary fermenter (at the bottom to avoid oxidation). Leave behind trub in primary fermenter.
3. Place stopper and airlock atop secondary fermenter and return to the fermentation space.
4. When haze drops to the bottom of the secondary fermenter, the beer is ready to bottle (~10-16 days)*.

BOTTLING (Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation! Avoid oxidation!)
1. Boil 2 cups carbon filtered water in a small saucepan, add corn sugar and mix until dissolved. Fill the larger saucepan with cold water and then place the small saucepan inside to cool for 5 minutes.
2. Place secondary fermenter 3 feet off the ground, then pour in sugar water and gently mix with the racking cane (avoiding aeration but mixing sufficiently). Return airlock, cover with a towel to avoid light exposure, to and let sit for 1 hour (to settle out any trub). Cover with a towel to avoid light damage.
Meanwhile, wash bottles in dishwasher (without soap).
3. Boil 2 cups water in a small saucepan, place bottle caps inside for 2 minutes, then strain.
4. Fill racking cane and hose with water. Bend hose at the half-way point, allowing water to drain out the open end.
5. Place racking cane half way into secondary fermenter, then push filler valve down in the bowl until beer reaches the valve.
6. Fill each bottle to the top, allowing the displacement of the bottle filler to bring the beer down to ¾” below the top.
7. Allow bottles to sit for 10 minutes (to allow CO2 production to displace oxygen in the headspace of the bottle), then cap in the order they were filled.
8. Let bottles sit in a dark, room-temperature space for 14 days to carbonate. Once carbonated, keep refrigerated, and drink.
__________________
vnzjunk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 09:54 AM   #8
seanppp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 258
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Seems to be a consensus. Thanks for the (non)answers. Perhaps it was too much to ask

__________________
seanppp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 02:50 PM   #9
Demus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,227
Liked 157 Times on 128 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by seanppp
Seems to be a consensus. Thanks for the (non)answers. Perhaps it was too much to ask
Maybe if you ask a specific question we could be more help ;-)
__________________
Demus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2013, 03:00 PM   #10
Tinhorn
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Bastrop, TX
Posts: 527
Liked 102 Times on 70 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

It is a bit of a manifesto and I am not really sure I have the expertise or attention span to find flaws or provide helpful hints. My process is nowhere near that well documented or precise . I just try to not hurt myself mostly and don't repeat prior mistakes! That being said I am still tweaking the process every time so..... anyways good luck and good brewing!! I hope you find the answers you seek friend!

__________________
Tinhorn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thoughts or suggestions on my SMaSH recipe and process? itsme_timd Recipes/Ingredients 7 05-08-2013 07:34 PM
First brew in process! slantedbolt Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 28 11-01-2010 12:24 PM
mash process suggestions for Leffe Blonde Patirck Recipes/Ingredients 3 10-17-2010 02:34 AM
Too many changes to Brew Process? Marko73 General Techniques 11 09-16-2008 04:50 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS