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Seveneer 02-22-2006 04:59 PM

Stuck ferment that wasn't
 
Hi,

I've done a silly thing and wonder if anyone else has done this.

I leave my beers in primary until the krausen falls into the brew, then I rack off to secondary. Never had a problem with this before until today (racked yesterday).

Just went to see if there was much air-lock activity and there was nothing at all. Screwed down the plastic cap with the air-lock attached (I use a 6 UK gallon plastic bin with a 4 inch cap drilled to take a bung and air-lock for secondary). Still nothing. Suspected a stuck ferment so added some yeast. Screwed the cap back on and....Bingo.... air-lock bubbles every 5 seconds.

So, instead of a stuck fermentation, it looks like I forgot to lube the o-ring on the cap!!!

Anyone else done this? Will I have to rack off into a tertiary when this has finished or just leave it be for two or three weeks? I'll probably leave it but I'd value your comments.

And, before anyone points it out, I know most people wait for primary to finish completely before going to secondary. I prefer to get it into secondary quickly as I use an open primary.

Thanks
/Phil.

Janx 02-22-2006 05:12 PM

Why do you feel a tertiary might be necessary? Because you added more yeast?

If so, I wouldn't worry about it. That amount of yeast isn't going to add much in the big picture. The amount of yeast that falls out of solution when the fermentation finishes will be more.

But maybe I misunderstood the thrust of the question...

Seveneer 02-22-2006 06:23 PM

Yeah, I wondered if I should rack it off the 2nd lot of yeast. I guess I'll just wait for it to finish fermenting and clear down for a couple of weeks then keg it.

Thanks,
/Phil.

boo boo 02-22-2006 11:12 PM

If there isn't anything in your wort to eat than your yeast will fall out of solution fast. As for using an open primary, is there any reason for that? Why not use a closed primary an relax a bit?

Seveneer 02-23-2006 07:13 AM

I have always used an open primary. I read somewhere that this was how all English ales are fermented. I might try closed as I guess there's no reason not to.

Genghis77 03-16-2006 12:37 AM

I seem to have a stuck ferment with a 1.122 OG Cuvee wine yeast supposed to handle 23%. It froze at 1.062. Repiched with another high gravity wine yeast, no drop in gravity. Open to suggestions.:drunk: Tastes very sweet and malty.
Tried bottling one with primer and it carbonated, so indicates yeast at work. Totally confused on correcting this problem or cause.

Jim Karr 03-16-2006 10:05 PM

Open primary
 
Serveer, I was amazed and surprised when I visited a commercial brewery in Traverse City, Michigan.....imagine a 550 gallon cube-shaped OPEN TOP PRIMARY! The krausen must have been five inches thick. The manager said that the krausen often would overflow and run down the front of the fermenter. People who were waiting to be seated at the brewpub would comment, "Uh, your beer is running over!"

Baron von BeeGee 03-16-2006 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Karr
...imagine a 550 gallon cube-shaped OPEN TOP PRIMARY!

This amazes me, as well. I guess a commercial brewery has a high enough pitching rate to get thanks cranking fast enough that the kraeusen protects the wort. Still, seems risky from a homebrewer's perspective!

Jester 03-16-2006 11:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baron von BeeGee
This amazes me, as well. I guess a commercial brewery has a high enough pitching rate to get thanks cranking fast enough that the kraeusen protects the wort. Still, seems risky from a homebrewer's perspective!

that is crazy to think of an open topped fermenter... especially since we are all so careful about sealing ours... hmmm...

Jester

budbo 03-17-2006 12:09 AM

Quote:

This amazes me, as well. I guess a commercial brewery has a high enough pitching rate to get thanks cranking fast enough that the kraeusen protects the wort. Still, seems risky from a homebrewer's perspective!
The 2 micro's I've been to that do this have the fermenters in a Sanitized area with Air scrubbers in the ventilation, the brewers wear throw away paper coverals when they go in.


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