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Old 07-11-2005, 05:56 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Dienekles
I wonder why the yeast never resorted to eating trub in your beers. What yeast were you using?
Gentlemen, please excuse the ignorance of a complete newbie, but I thought that the trub was at (or moving towards) the bottom, and with ale yeast anyway, the active yeasties were at (or towards) the top? How could ale yeasts eat trub?
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Old 07-11-2005, 06:10 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El Pistolero
Gentlemen, please excuse the ignorance of a complete newbie, but I thought that the trub was at (or moving towards) the bottom, and with ale yeast anyway, the active yeasties were at (or towards) the top? How could ale yeasts eat trub?

What everyone is referring to is "Autolysis", which is described here. Its not the yeast eating the trub...its the yeast dying and rupturing, releasing off flavors into your beer. As John Palmer states "Autolysis is not inevitable, but it is lurking."
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Old 07-11-2005, 06:41 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by El Pistolero
Gentlemen, please excuse the ignorance of a complete newbie, but I thought that the trub was at (or moving towards) the bottom, and with ale yeast anyway, the active yeasties were at (or towards) the top? How could ale yeasts eat trub?
Yeast will never *eat* the trub. The only thing any yeast will eat is fermentable sugar. I think what is being referred to in previous posts is autolysis (yeast death) that can cause off-flavors in your brew. As previously mentioned by tnlandsailor this doesn't begin to occur for weeks after fermentation is complete. This makes racking to a secondary fermenter unneccessary in the simplest case.

There are a few reasons you may want to rack to secondary however. If you are lagering there is a good chance your brew will spend long enough on the yeast for autolysis to begin. I believe there are some styles that use different types of yeast at different times during the process. These types of brews would also probably demand racking to secondary. There are some filtering benefits to using secondary fermentation as well. You leave almost all of the trub behind when you rack to secondary and then rack again when you bottle/keg further reducing the amount of trub that makes it into your finished product. I'm sure there are more reasons as well but those are the ones I can think of off the top of my head.
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Old 07-11-2005, 06:49 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vtfan99
What everyone is referring to is "Autolysis", which is described here. Its not the yeast eating the trub...its the yeast dying and rupturing, releasing off flavors into your beer. As John Palmer states "Autolysis is not inevitable, but it is lurking."
Thanks for the clarification...I'd been reading Palmer's site, but hadn't quite gotten that far.

The amount of knowledge available on this forum is just incredible...sometimes I feel like such a grasshopper
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Old 07-11-2005, 08:18 PM   #25
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some yeast also will/can consume diacetyl when they finish munch'n on all the goodies in the wort. that's why when brewinga lagers, you should do a diacetyl rest at around 62-64 degrees for 2-3 days after fermentation, so they will consume what diacetyl they produced. thus, helping to reduce the butterscoth flavors often found in and desired in certain ales. some yeast strains will consume more diacetyl than others.

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Old 07-11-2005, 08:22 PM   #26
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I had thought about filtering to a primary myself but was worried that I might filter out something that may be needed in the fermenting process. Anyways it seems like there is a lot of people who cannot find filters that fit or work to strain out the desired "sludge". Since I haven't brewed my first beer yet, I am not familier with what the wort looks like when you transfer it to the primary fermenter. Still I have some suggestions about what you could use to filter with. My Dad is a professional painter, and when he was preparing his sprayer with paint he would first strain the paint with a big cloth (maybe nylon mesh) strainer. The strainer fit over and inside a 5 gallon bucket and he would just transfer the paint from another bucket into the bucket fitted with the strainer. This seems like it would work well for filtering wort. You would first sanitize the strainer by probably boiling it with water, then fit it over your primary fermentor, and pour your wort into the fermenter, I can't imagine why this wouldn't work. You can get the strainers from any paint supply store, probably home depot, lowes or walmart too, I doubt they cost much.

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Old 07-11-2005, 08:29 PM   #27
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or, you can just syphon from the brew kettle to your primary. all the hops and cold break in the kettle have done their part already, and are useless in the primary. my brew kettle has a spigot about an 1" of the bottom. i just hook a hose to it, open it up, and drain to my primary. leave all the bittering/flavoring hops behind.......just helps the beer clear........

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Old 07-11-2005, 08:36 PM   #28
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Yeah Broux that seems like the simplest way to go. I need a spigot on my kettle... I wander how hard it would be to drill the steel... probably better if I not mess with it.

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Old 07-11-2005, 09:34 PM   #29
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piece of cake. get a 7/8 " bit, and someone who has a drill press. it'll leak the first few times (little trickle) then seal up. it's easier and safer w/ two people.

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Old 08-20-2005, 05:11 AM   #30
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I realize this thread it a little old, but i thought i would add something. to strain my wort, i just go to the paint department at home depot and buy a 5 gallon paint strainer for like $1, it has an elastic band around the top that fits onto my ferminting bucket. I put the strainer on the bucket pour the wort in, chill it then just pull the strainer out and throw it all in the trash

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