The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Step Mash...why or why not?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-26-2007, 09:34 PM   #1
biggerk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 23
Likes Given: 1

Default Step Mash...why or why not?

This question is about step mashing. I just read the article in this month's (Jan-Feb 08) Brew Your Own (BYO) about step mashing and still have questions...

Why step mash? If modern malts are otherwise fully modified, what benefits do I get from step mashing? What about if I'm using ingrediants like wheat flakes, oatmeal, etc?

Why not step mash? If malts are otherwide fully modified, is there a reason I SHOULDN'T step mash?

What beer styles benefit or should be step mashed (so then I need the mash schedule to use [temp / time.])

Thanks in advance!

__________________
BiggerK

On Tap
- Keg 1: KICKED Belgian Style Pale Ale (Fat Tire / Rare Vos clone)
- Keg 2: English Brown
- Keg 3: Cider
- Keg 4: Belgian Wit
- Keg 5: Empty
In Carboy: 1 Gallon Batches of Maple Porter and Pale Ale
In Bottle: Belgian Dubbel Blond...
On Deck: When we get to ABQ Oatmeal Stout
Future Brew: TBD

Last edited by biggerk; 12-27-2007 at 04:30 PM.
biggerk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2007, 07:36 PM   #2
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,648
Liked 131 Times on 124 Posts

Default

Take a look at chapter 14 of Palmer's www.howtobrew.com

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2007, 07:42 PM   #3
ohiobrewtus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ohiobrewtus's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ohio
Posts: 7,814
Liked 37 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

IMO, the deciding factor is whether you use a cooler as an MLT or if you use a keggle/pot that's direct fired.

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_bird
Well, if you *love* it.... again, note that my A.S.S. has five pounds.
ohiobrewtus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2007, 08:20 PM   #4
Brewsmith
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewsmith's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 6,259
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts

Default

If you are using a large percentage of wheat, or something else that has more protien in it, a protien rest can help with some possible haziness. Other than that, most malts are fully modified and steps aren't necessary.

__________________
Fermenting:#160 Apollo/Calypso Pale Ale
Kegged:#153 Old Helicon Barleywine 2013, #157 Irish Red, #158 Mosaic IPA, #159 Bravo/Delta ESB
Up Next:Brown Porter, American Stout, Imperial Stout
My Recipes
Tuba Sonata

Smith & Co. Custom Tap Handles
Brewsmith is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2007, 09:27 PM   #5
biggerk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 23
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohiobrewtus
IMO, the deciding factor is whether you use a cooler as an MLT or if you use a keggle/pot that's direct fired.
Lately, I've been using the boil pot (7.5 Gal) as the mash tun only because its easier to stir the mash without spilling half of it out of my combined mash/lauter tun (MLT.) Then I use a 2-qt sauce pan (don't tell SWMBO!) to ladel the mash into the lauter tun.

I use the "ZAPAP" bucket in bucket method to lauter. Actually, I cut the bottom 2-inches off the bottom of the bucket with all the holes driled in, and flipped it over to make a false bottom.
__________________
BiggerK

On Tap
- Keg 1: KICKED Belgian Style Pale Ale (Fat Tire / Rare Vos clone)
- Keg 2: English Brown
- Keg 3: Cider
- Keg 4: Belgian Wit
- Keg 5: Empty
In Carboy: 1 Gallon Batches of Maple Porter and Pale Ale
In Bottle: Belgian Dubbel Blond...
On Deck: When we get to ABQ Oatmeal Stout
Future Brew: TBD
biggerk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2007, 09:34 PM   #6
biggerk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 23
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewsmith
If you are using a large percentage of wheat, or something else that has more protien in it, a protien rest can help with some possible haziness. Other than that, most malts are fully modified and steps aren't necessary.
Interesting point, because the Belgian Wits I'm doing are 50% wheat flakes. And in both those cases, I did step mash.
The first time by accident; I just couldn't hit the mash temp (too low) so I dumped the whole thing out of my combined-MLT into the brew pot and added heat. It came out great!
The second Wit that's fermenting now, I purposly did a protein rest, largely on the advice of the brewers at one of the local microbrews (Bristol Brewery, Colorado Springs.)
__________________
BiggerK

On Tap
- Keg 1: KICKED Belgian Style Pale Ale (Fat Tire / Rare Vos clone)
- Keg 2: English Brown
- Keg 3: Cider
- Keg 4: Belgian Wit
- Keg 5: Empty
In Carboy: 1 Gallon Batches of Maple Porter and Pale Ale
In Bottle: Belgian Dubbel Blond...
On Deck: When we get to ABQ Oatmeal Stout
Future Brew: TBD
biggerk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2007, 11:33 PM   #7
malkore
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
malkore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 6,922
Liked 32 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

step mashing also allows you to control how fermentable the wort is. high mashing temps, say 160F, will give you less fermentable sugar, so a sweeter finished beer with a lot of mouth feel.

lower temps give you a much drier beer.

sometimes a step mash is just a protein rest, and then 153 for a balance between beta and alpha amylaze...some times its a beta rest and an alpha rest...with no protein rest.

but Palmer explains it much better than me.

__________________
Malkore
Primary: English Mild
On tap: Pale Ale, Lancelot's Wheat, English Brown Ale, Steam Beer, HoovNuts IPA
Bottled: MOAM, Braggot, Raspberry Melomel, Merlot, Apfelwein, Pyment, Sweet mead, Cabernet
Gal in 2009: 27, Gal in 2010: 34, Gal in 2011: 13, Gal in 2012: 10
malkore is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Step Mash Procedure? Khirsah17 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 16 05-21-2009 04:53 PM
first 2 step mash DanVader All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 0 03-07-2009 11:41 AM
Step Mash vs. Infusion batfishdog37 General Techniques 2 02-25-2009 06:29 PM
When to step mash? Brew-boy All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 11 01-09-2007 10:18 AM
Decoction for mash-out step captaineriv All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 04-18-2006 01:30 PM