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Old 06-11-2010, 08:45 AM   #11
MattHollingsworth
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In my experience an auto siphon getting bubbles won't cause any troubles. You need to be careful when racking to not splash. Get that outlet tube all the way to the bottom, no splashing. If you're using secondary, consider not using a secondary or maybe flushing the fermenter with CO2 before racking. If you're kegging, flush the kegs with CO2 before filling.

Also in my experience as a judge years ago (and with local homebrewers now), the single most common problem with beers is oxidation. I'm hyper sensitive to it. Some people don't notice it or do notice it but don't know what it is. If you can be sure that this *is* oxidation you have, try to take the pint glass half full way of viewing it, take it as a lesson and clean up your technique.

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Old 06-11-2010, 12:22 PM   #12
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Tare off a small piece of cardboard and suck on it for a few minutes. Then you will know what oxidation is like.

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Old 06-11-2010, 06:02 PM   #13
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One of the reasons I like using glass carboys for fermenting is because they are so easy to clean. I make sure I clean them right away after use, then I just have to sanitize and rinse before then next time. Also, It is so easy to purge them and put a cap on it to keep air and contaminants out, and this process gives me more peace of mind with the outcome. I cringe every time I see a new thread about someone with contaminated beer, ewwwww! It is very sad, all that time, energy, and money wasted. Still, it is a reality check and makes me pay even more attention to my cleaning habits. Still, I am amazed when a new batch comes out nice and fresh, such a nice feeling. I guess we all have that feeling that it may not work out, but that makes it that much more gratifying when it does.

When I transfer to my keg, I fill the tank with CO2, then open the lid and place a sheet of aluminum foil over the top till I siphon, then just poke a hole in the foil and insert the siphon tube. No air can get in while the keg is filling becasue the co2 is being displace during this time. I keep the lid in a bowl of Iodophor and water until I recap the keg. After that, I connect the CO2 gas line to the keg and purge again, pressurize and crash cool while carbonating, works great!

Also, I like to put some containers of ice in the kegerator to help speed up the cold crash, which gets it down to the 35 to 40 degree range in less than 24 hrs.

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Old 06-11-2010, 08:23 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shepherd5 View Post
…I guess we all have that feeling that it may not work out, but that makes it that much more gratifying when it does.
I guess I am an odd ball then. Sure I clean everything with Star-San, but I NEVER worry about it. I do a quick dip in the solution of my tools, fill the carboys, shake, and then dump the liquid back into the bowl. Then get to work brewing.

Not to get too far off topic, but… There are scientific studies showing that positive thinking works. Of course by simple logic, negative thinking works too. RDWHAHB is a good rule to live by. Do your best and let the yeast do their job. Those little buggers can wipe out MOST infections before they can take hold.

BTW Shepherd, I am in NO way criticizing your steps. On the contrary, keeping O2 away from the brew is very wise. All it takes is a headroom full of O2 and a tipped over keg to mess things up. Not to mention the pressure pushing the O2 into the beer.

I think my oxidation was from letting too much air mix in when I started the auto-siphon I use with a wand to bottle. I try to do a slow careful pour from the carboy down the side of the bottle bucket which is setting in a small sink at an angle. Thankfully, I do have a spigot I bought to install on the bucket. I guess I need to go ahead and do that and loose the auto-siphon before my next bottling.
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Old 06-11-2010, 09:00 PM   #15
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Quote:
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I think my oxidation was from letting too much air mix in when I started the auto-siphon I use with a wand to bottle. I try to do a slow careful pour from the carboy down the side of the bottle bucket which is setting in a small sink at an angle...
Another source of introducing oxygen into your brew is at racking time.

You should cut off the flow of the brew at the end of the syphon before the air from the primary gets sucked into the carboy.
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Old 06-12-2010, 12:06 AM   #16
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Good point. Even when bottling I have been known to suck it dry.

Oh…wait…what… no, I mean the siphon sucks the bucket dry.

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Old 06-12-2010, 12:50 AM   #17
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I'm almost positive it was the auto-siphon.

I've made dozens of batches of beer over the course of about 13 years. 1st time I ever got this flavor, and 1st time I ever saw the auto-siphon suck so much air. It was literally about 50% beer and 50% air bubbles going into the bottling bucket. I'm usually very careful about not introducing any oxygen.

So, I was half expecting it. But when I tasted it at first, it was fine. Even had my Dad over last Sunday and we both were commenting how good it was. Then next night, Bam! Cardboard. Weird.

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Old 06-12-2010, 07:21 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunnright00 View Post
I'm almost positive it was the auto-siphon.

I've made dozens of batches of beer over the course of about 13 years. 1st time I ever got this flavor, and 1st time I ever saw the auto-siphon suck so much air. It was literally about 50% beer and 50% air bubbles going into the bottling bucket. I'm usually very careful about not introducing any oxygen.

So, I was half expecting it. But when I tasted it at first, it was fine. Even had my Dad over last Sunday and we both were commenting how good it was. Then next night, Bam! Cardboard. Weird.
Aw well then, that must be it. I thought you meant the usual thing I hear on here about people worrying about those few bubbles that you usually see with an auto siphon. Maybe the seal on yours isn't good anymore and it's time for a new one.
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Old 06-13-2010, 05:50 AM   #19
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Yeah, got a new one. Works great. Not sure if it was the seal of the inner tube, or the shape of the outer tube. Now that I have a new one, I'll do some experiments to see which it is, then I'll have a spare part of the one that works.

Had another brown ale tonight. Not really as bad as I thought, but I won't be giving these out as gifts. Just have to start drinkin'!

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Old 06-13-2010, 07:30 AM   #20
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Yeah, drink 'em fast before it gets worse!

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