Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Snow-globe Looking Belg. Quad in Primary

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-02-2009, 02:19 PM   #1
hedonist91
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Poughkeepsie, NY
Posts: 72
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default Snow-globe Looking Belg. Quad in Primary

Hey folks, I'm not sure if someone has posted something like this before, but I couldn't seem to find it.
Aimed for a tripel, ended up with a quad, and it had a vigorous fermentation to start. Needed a blow off tube, 'cause my carboy is only 5 gallons, and I had a OG of 1.107 before pitching my starter, which almost overflowed it.

So, while it was fermenting, the carboy looked like one of those snow-globes you see around christmas time. Crazy stuff. I'm figuring that was yeast going ape-****, and I let it go. It's been about 3 weeks and I haven't moved it to the secondary yet, because it was going so damn buck wild I didn't wanna touch it.
Now, the buck-wild has stopped, but all that "snow" is sitting motionless, suspended. The trub has increased in size, too. I guess some of it is settling out?
My question is, do you think this will all eventually settle out? I don't want a snowy beer when I bottle next year, so if it doesn't, do I try to filter it? Do I use gelatin finnings to clarify? Would that break belgian traditional brewing? Did I already do that? If I filter it, will it eliminate the yeast needed for bottle conditioning? Any imput is much appreciated. I can't wait to drink this mofo.

Thanks guys.

__________________
hedonist91 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-02-2009, 02:31 PM   #2
hedonist91
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Poughkeepsie, NY
Posts: 72
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Update: Just checked the gravity with my wine theif. I'm already down to 1.054, making it about 7 percent. It has a slick mouthfeel, which i'm hoping will be reduced when it clears. Tastes like sweet holy heaven, except sweet, which makes sense. The airlock bubbles every 19 seconds or so. Very, very consisten fermentation. Never had one like it. Sucessful brews are so satisfying. Not counting my chickens just yet though.

__________________
hedonist91 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-02-2009, 02:39 PM   #3
hedonist91
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Poughkeepsie, NY
Posts: 72
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

PS-Another question-Since the fermentation slowed down, and it's been in primary 24days or so, should I rack to 2ndary? I'm afraid if I do, I'll leave behind too much yeast- There's chunks on top that fall down, float and move whenever I move the carboy, so I'm figuring that's just happy yeast doing its job. Should I rack away from those for the sake of not gaining harsh flavors from the trub?

__________________
hedonist91 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-02-2009, 02:42 PM   #4
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2729 Times on 1637 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

You will find that many of us leave our beers in primary for 3-4 weeks and only secondary if we are adding fruit or oak, or to dry hop (though many of us dry hop in primary now as well)....and we have found our beer vastly improved by letting the beer stay in contact with the yeast.

There's been a big shift in brewing consciousness in the last few years where many of us believe that yeast is a good thing, and besides just fermenting the beer, that they are fastidious creatures who go back and clean up any by products created by themselves during fermentation, which may lead to off flavors.

Rather than the yeast being the cause of off flavors, it is now looked at by many of us, that they will if left alone actually remove those off flavors, and make for clearer and cleaner tasting beers.

Even John Palmer talks about this in How To Bew;

Quote:
Originally Posted by How To Brew
Leaving an ale beer in the primary fermentor for a total of 2-3 weeks (instead of just the one week most canned kits recommend), will provide time for the conditioning reactions and improve the beer. This extra time will also let more sediment settle out before bottling, resulting in a clearer beer and easier pouring. And, three weeks in the primary fermentor is usually not enough time for off-flavors to occur.
This is a big, even if I had planned to bulk age it in a primary for a number of months, which this definitely would benefit by, I wouldn't move it for a month. You want to let the yeast do their job and then clean up after themselves.
__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-02-2009, 03:03 PM   #5
SevenFields
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 759
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

The classic great Revvy reply!!!
I have been following this advice for 10 batches now, and couldnt agree more!!!

__________________

Tap 1: Galaxy IPA
Tap 2: Bourbon Honey Brown Ale
Primary 1: Centential Blonde
Primary 2: Belgian IPA
Secondary:
Bottled: American Barleywine
On Deck: Torpedo IPA

SevenFields is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-02-2009, 03:15 PM   #6
DonD13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 16
Default

Revvy hit the nail on the head: leave it in there for awhile. I'd check gravity once a week or so, and don't worry about leaving it on the yeast for awhile.

Remember, Belgain brews are supposed to have some yeast character, so assuming your yeast is appropriate, and there's nothing making it spoil (doubtful now that its gone through vigorous fermentation and reached a decent alcohol content), let it sit for awhile. You'll probably gain a few more points of ABV, and tame the sweetness you detected somewhat.

The 9% Tripel I brewed a few years back was in primary for 2 months

__________________

Carboy 1: Dry Cider batch 2

Carboy 2: Imperial Wit

Bottled/Tap-a-draft: Dry Cider, Tripel, Fat Tire Clone, Belgian Raspberry Ale, Patersbier, Double IPA

Planning: First all grain brew, new brew room, long draw 4 tap keg system/keezer

DonD13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2009, 04:18 PM   #7
hedonist91
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Poughkeepsie, NY
Posts: 72
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

wow, Revvy, thanks. That was awesome. Yeah, I don't really want to touch it. I'm using the Trappist Wyeast, the high-gravity one, starts with 37XX. I'm not at home in front of my notes. Beersmith says i should get 11.67% ABV on this one, and I'm really pumped because it tastes amazing. Like I said, just worried about clarity, because if I come this close to what I think is perfect, I'd hate clarity to be an issue and then have to alter what I think tastes fantastic.

__________________
hedonist91 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2009, 04:23 PM   #8
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2729 Times on 1637 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hedonist91 View Post
Like I said, just worried about clarity, because if I come this close to what I think is perfect, I'd hate clarity to be an issue and then have to alter what I think tastes fantastic.
And then why do you think I do it???? Could that be the very reason I do so?

Leaving it in primary for a month with allow the yeast to clean up after itself, and it will compress the yeast cake, which will make for extremely clear and crisp tasting beer.

I have had the term "Jewell-like appearance and clarity" applied to some of my beers from BJCP judges in contests. Think a judge would use those words if my beer were cloudy?
__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Christmas Beer, other side of the globe f8_nz Recipes/Ingredients 1 11-09-2009 02:17 PM
Adventures in an alcoholic snow globe Thanks StirStarter Guy. BillTheSlink Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 11-07-2009 11:44 PM
Snow globe to opaque... East Equipment/Sanitation 8 09-09-2009 10:57 PM
Boston Globe bashes 'Beer Wars' Berlbrew General Beer Discussion 26 04-14-2009 09:46 PM
Cherries in the Snow - Primary Fermentation K Spec Extract Brewing 6 09-22-2007 02:47 AM