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-   -   Setting up a pipeline/How do you brew? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/setting-up-pipeline-how-do-you-brew-356397/)

Hammy71 09-24-2012 12:21 PM

3 Attachment(s)

Over time, I've amassed enough equipment to keep my pipeline (and me) happy. I brew every other weekend. I have an old fridge in the basement with a dual temperature controller on it. The fridge has a Fermwrap across the back for heating and of course the fridge does it's cooling thing. The fridge can hold 2 6-gallon carboys. After the first week in the chamber, I remove the carboys and put them in the 'man room', which is also in the basement. The temperature in the room stays between 65-75F all year. There I let the beers bulk condition until kegging time (usually at least 2-3 more weeks). If I feel the need to cold crash the beer, I have a refrigerator in the 'man room' that I can put the carboys in. Now, depending of what the SWMBO puts in there, I can sometimes get two carboys in there at a time. If not, I just put one in, and after a day or two, swap it with the other.

After racking to the kegs, I take them to my "charging station". Basically it's a 20# CO2 tank with about 6 lines coming off of the regulator. After purging the beer, I can carb them up while they wait for a spot in either the keezer or the kegerator. Because I'm carbing up the beer warm, I do have to use a higher setting on the regulator. But, that's no big deal.

Between my keezer and my kegerator, I have 6 taps available, with room in the keezer for one extra keg. Basically when I blow a keg, I have one already chilled and carbed in the keezer. Takes a minute or so to swap and voila......beer! Then I rotate the next one from the "charging station" to the keezer and the process continues.

Now, this didn't happen over night. Took years ( and a lot of cash) to get to this point. I've got well over 20 kegs going now, and I almost exclusively do 10 gallon batches. I helped a friend build a keezer for his home and he comes over and we split the 10 gallon batches now. We recently just split the cost of some more kegs. But all of the fermenting/conditioning happens at my place.

You'll have to find a system that works for you and your home. I have the luxury of some extra space to put all this stuff.....and I guess an understanding wife and a little disposable income to pay the damn electric bills.....

Cheers!!


Hammy71 09-24-2012 12:21 PM

3 Attachment(s)

Over time, I've amassed enough equipment to keep my pipeline (and me) happy. I brew every other weekend. I have an old fridge in the basement with a dual temperature controller on it. The fridge has a Fermwrap across the back for heating and of course the fridge does it's cooling thing. The fridge can hold 2 6-gallon carboys. After the first week in the chamber, I remove the carboys and put them in the 'man room', which is also in the basement. The temperature in the room stays between 65-75F all year. There I let the beers bulk condition until kegging time (usually at least 2-3 more weeks). If I feel the need to cold crash the beer, I have a refrigerator in the 'man room' that I can put the carboys in. Now, depending of what the SWMBO puts in there, I can sometimes get two carboys in there at a time. If not, I just put one in, and after a day or two, swap it with the other.

After racking to the kegs, I take them to my "charging station". Basically it's a 20# CO2 tank with about 6 lines coming off of the regulator. After purging the beer, I can carb them up while they wait for a spot in either the keezer or the kegerator. Because I'm carbing up the beer warm, I do have to use a higher setting on the regulator. But, that's no big deal.

Between my keezer and my kegerator, I have 6 taps available, with room in the keezer for one extra keg. Basically when I blow a keg, I have one already chilled and carbed in the keezer. Takes a minute or so to swap and voila......beer! Then I rotate the next one from the "charging station" to the keezer and the process continues.

Now, this didn't happen over night. Took years ( and a lot of cash) to get to this point. I've got well over 20 kegs going now, and I almost exclusively do 10 gallon batches. I helped a friend build a keezer for his home and he comes over and we split the 10 gallon batches now. We recently just split the cost of some more kegs. But all of the fermenting/conditioning happens at my place.

You'll have to find a system that works for you and your home. I have the luxury of some extra space to put all this stuff.....and I guess an understanding wife and a little disposable income to pay the damn electric bills.....

Cheers!!


Hammy71 09-24-2012 12:21 PM

3 Attachment(s)

Over time, I've amassed enough equipment to keep my pipeline (and me) happy. I brew every other weekend. I have an old fridge in the basement with a dual temperature controller on it. The fridge has a Fermwrap across the back for heating and of course the fridge does it's cooling thing. The fridge can hold 2 6-gallon carboys. After the first week in the chamber, I remove the carboys and put them in the 'man room', which is also in the basement. The temperature in the room stays between 65-75F all year. There I let the beers bulk condition until kegging time (usually at least 2-3 more weeks). If I feel the need to cold crash the beer, I have a refrigerator in the 'man room' that I can put the carboys in. Now, depending of what the SWMBO puts in there, I can sometimes get two carboys in there at a time. If not, I just put one in, and after a day or two, swap it with the other.

After racking to the kegs, I take them to my "charging station". Basically it's a 20# CO2 tank with about 6 lines coming off of the regulator. After purging the beer, I can carb them up while they wait for a spot in either the keezer or the kegerator. Because I'm carbing up the beer warm, I do have to use a higher setting on the regulator. But, that's no big deal.

Between my keezer and my kegerator, I have 6 taps available, with room in the keezer for one extra keg. Basically when I blow a keg, I have one already chilled and carbed in the keezer. Takes a minute or so to swap and voila......beer! Then I rotate the next one from the "charging station" to the keezer and the process continues.

Now, this didn't happen over night. Took years ( and a lot of cash) to get to this point. I've got well over 20 kegs going now, and I almost exclusively do 10 gallon batches. I helped a friend build a keezer for his home and he comes over and we split the 10 gallon batches now. We recently just split the cost of some more kegs. But all of the fermenting/conditioning happens at my place.

You'll have to find a system that works for you and your home. I have the luxury of some extra space to put all this stuff.....and I guess an understanding wife and a little disposable income to pay the damn electric bills.....

Cheers!!


Grossy 10-06-2012 02:48 PM

4 Attachment(s)

I am from Tucson AZ, our weather is not as cool as yours is, but we do experience your weather in our winters.

For you pipe line, accurately calculate how much you drink each month in your household. Then figure out how much you need to brew to keep up that supply. Then brew more. There will be times that you cant brew, and you will need your reserves to get you through the tough times.

I now only do 10 gallon brews. And I brew every three weeks.

Here is my fermentation chamber and kegerator:

The fermentation chamber on the right (the 1950's avocado green) I got on Craig's list for $50, it is a freezer with a temp controller on top. The fridge on the left was Craig's list for $200.00. I wanted the freezer below the fridge so that the beer taps would be at the correct height. (Also that freezer is what I use to make 100lbs of ice for my Immersion chiller. Tap water here is 90 degrees.)

Behind the squirt bottle of star san is my thermometer hanging down. I also have thermometers on all the ale pales, and occasionally i even put my brew thermometer in there to check accuracy. They all read the same. (The hanging thermometer is an old pool thermometer, my son broke the outer glass).


Grossy 10-06-2012 02:48 PM

4 Attachment(s)

I am from Tucson AZ, our weather is not as cool as yours is, but we do experience your weather in our winters.

For you pipe line, accurately calculate how much you drink each month in your household. Then figure out how much you need to brew to keep up that supply. Then brew more. There will be times that you cant brew, and you will need your reserves to get you through the tough times.

I now only do 10 gallon brews. And I brew every three weeks.

Here is my fermentation chamber and kegerator:

The fermentation chamber on the right (the 1950's avocado green) I got on Craig's list for $50, it is a freezer with a temp controller on top. The fridge on the left was Craig's list for $200.00. I wanted the freezer below the fridge so that the beer taps would be at the correct height. (Also that freezer is what I use to make 100lbs of ice for my Immersion chiller. Tap water here is 90 degrees.)

Behind the squirt bottle of star san is my thermometer hanging down. I also have thermometers on all the ale pales, and occasionally i even put my brew thermometer in there to check accuracy. They all read the same. (The hanging thermometer is an old pool thermometer, my son broke the outer glass).


Grossy 10-06-2012 02:48 PM

4 Attachment(s)

I am from Tucson AZ, our weather is not as cool as yours is, but we do experience your weather in our winters.

For you pipe line, accurately calculate how much you drink each month in your household. Then figure out how much you need to brew to keep up that supply. Then brew more. There will be times that you cant brew, and you will need your reserves to get you through the tough times.

I now only do 10 gallon brews. And I brew every three weeks.

Here is my fermentation chamber and kegerator:

The fermentation chamber on the right (the 1950's avocado green) I got on Craig's list for $50, it is a freezer with a temp controller on top. The fridge on the left was Craig's list for $200.00. I wanted the freezer below the fridge so that the beer taps would be at the correct height. (Also that freezer is what I use to make 100lbs of ice for my Immersion chiller. Tap water here is 90 degrees.)

Behind the squirt bottle of star san is my thermometer hanging down. I also have thermometers on all the ale pales, and occasionally i even put my brew thermometer in there to check accuracy. They all read the same. (The hanging thermometer is an old pool thermometer, my son broke the outer glass).



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