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Old 08-18-2010, 10:59 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by jmo88 View Post
Easy, man. You haven't gotten a straight answer because it's a difficult question that depends on many variables. Try googling "chlorine evaporation rate.". Temperature, humidity, vessel shape, concentration, all play a role here. Letting it sit for 24 hours will reduce chlorine. At what rate? Who knows.
Thanks. Has anyone tried the "let it sit out" method? What were the results?

If no one really knows, maybe it would be a good experiment for me to get some test strips and test the chlorine levels of water straight out of the tap, after sitting overnight, from the brita filter, and maybe compare that to bottled water and distilled water. I'll update if I choose to go this method.
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Old 08-19-2010, 06:49 PM   #12
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rappinkapc:

I have been brewing for the past 6 years. When I first started I too was in search of the perfect beer. I would trot down to the local grocery store with my 3, 5 gallon water bottles fill them up and then lug them down to my basement to use to brew beer.

I did this for almost 4 years until I went and talked to the local water department head. I asked him about our towns water quality. He said that the only additive to our water was chlorine. He then said that if you fill up your water bottles and let them sit overnight with the lid off that the chlorine would disapate.

I was somewhat skeptical and thought that boiling the water with campden tabs and letting it sit overnight was the happy medium. I did this for about 10 - 15 batches.

I then ran out of campden tabs when getting ready to boil water one time. I went ahead and just boiled the water and let it sit overnight. I did this for about 10 - 15 batches.

Last spring I did not have time to boil my water so I said what the hell and just filled up my water bottles and let them sit overnight and used them the next day.

The moral to this story. There was no taste difference between all three methods and the filler up and forget it is the method I use now.

Hope this helps.

TD

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Old 08-19-2010, 07:44 PM   #13
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I don't do any of that stuff. Water goes straight from my tap into the kettle, I heat it to strike temp. then into the mashtun it goes. I've done this in 4 different cities and I don't get any of these mystical off flavors that people worry about. I really doubt that anyone could taste these chlorophenols from tap water unless they used swimming pool water. I sort of think that most of the people who freak about this sort of thing are fish people and like to mess with water anyway.

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Old 08-19-2010, 07:50 PM   #14
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I don't do any of that stuff. Water goes straight from my tap into the kettle, I heat it to strike temp. then into the mashtun it goes. I've done this in 4 different cities and I don't get any of these mystical off flavors that people worry about. I really doubt that anyone could taste these chlorophenols from tap water unless they used swimming pool water. I sort of think that most of the people who freak about this sort of thing are fish people and like to mess with water anyway.
Well I am certainly one of those phish people. But when your beer smells of Bandaids, and it doesn't take much chlorine to affect that wort, then you need to do something about it. If you can smell the faintest bit of chlorine in your water, it will be very detrimental to your beer.
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Old 08-19-2010, 08:18 PM   #15
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I've never tried leaving my brewing water overnight to get rid of the chlorine, but I have done it with drinking water. A jug of water in the fridge overnight had no taste or smell of chlorine 12 hours later. Based on the saying that if your water smells and tastes good, you should be able to brew with it, I think an overnight rest should be fine.

-a.

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Old 08-20-2010, 02:13 AM   #16
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Thanks for all the replies. I was curious and bought some water test strips from a pet/aquarium store.
The baseline reading (straight from the tap) was lower than I expected. It was only about 0.25 ppm, which is less than the 0.94 ppm reported by my water district. There is not really much of a smell of chlorine straight from the tap either. I'm not sure if the strips I bought are precise enough for me to tell if there is much of a change in chlorine after leaving it out overnight, but I will report back anyway.
On a side note, the strips also tested for total hardness, total alkalinity, and pH, which all matched pretty close to the published water report.

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Old 08-20-2010, 02:25 AM   #17
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If you are so concerned about doing this brew organic and not using many resources, why not collect you rain water?? There is a brewery doing this. Oh...and you may want to build a fire for your boil. That would minimize the amount of resources utilized as well. Good luck!!

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Old 08-20-2010, 02:25 AM   #18
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The other consideration is if you are doing a full volume boil anyway. That will drive off the chlorine. Correct me somebody if I'm wrong, but I don't think chloramines boil off. My town adds that, so I use campden, but to tell the truth, I don't think I tasted it before I started using it.

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Old 08-20-2010, 05:46 AM   #19
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OT, but...

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The other consideration is if you are doing a full volume boil anyway. That will drive off the chlorine.
True as far as I know, but couldn't some of the trichlorophenols already have formed during the mash? And boiling after they've been formed wouldn't boil them off?

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Correct me somebody if I'm wrong, but I don't think chloramines boil off. My town adds that, so I use campden, but to tell the truth, I don't think I tasted it before I started using it.
True. Chloramine can be removed by metabisulphite, Vitamin C, Activated Carbon Filtering or superchlorination (According to Wikipedia)

However there are some people (and some other people) that claim Chloromine does boil off with a 20 minute boil.

Personally I boil the water and add some metabisulphite.
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Old 08-20-2010, 06:14 AM   #20
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Chloramine became popular as I recall because regular Chlorine would dissipate in the water system and leave the water & piping unprotected from the bad stuff. So they pump in something that lingers a lot longer.

Several sources report that leaving your water container in sunlight will speed up the off gassing process.
IMO if you can afford a quality filtration system for your drinking & brewing water you should have one.

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