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Old 02-06-2006, 04:34 PM   #1
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Default Re-pitching w/ trub from primary

Newbie technique question:

Would this be as simple as collecting the trub from primary of beer 1 (after racking) and pitching it w/ the wort of beer 2 that same day?

Or does the yeast need to be reactivated with a starter?

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Old 02-06-2006, 05:02 PM   #2
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you don't even need to "collect" it!

If you are going to be brewing batch #2 on the same day that you rack batch #1 to the secondary, you can simply pour the cooled wort from batch #2 DIRECTLY into the carboy on top of the yeast cake left over from batch #1. You don't need to clean the carboy or anything.

watch out though. that's the equivalent of using a nuclear yeast bomb for that second batch. It will start fermenting FAST and HARD.

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Old 02-06-2006, 05:28 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walker
watch out though. that's the equivalent of using a nuclear yeast bomb for that second batch. It will start fermenting FAST and HARD.

-walker
Thanks.

Hmm...sounds like a very efficient strategy. The pitching rate must be very high (hence the fast and hard fermentation). I'd think you could get the best of both worlds--scoop out half and save it, pitch on the other half?
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Old 02-06-2006, 05:37 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cweston
I'd think you could get the best of both worlds--scoop out half and save it, pitch on the other half?
You could probably do this. I just hate handling trub.

I actually stretch my yeast by making a very large starter, pitching half and saving half. When I want that yeast again, I'll make another starter with the leftovers, pitch half and save half again. I hope to get a few generations out of a smack pack this way.

I just recently started doing this, and haven't actually re-used any yeast from the fridge yet. I was supposed to re-use my 1056 from the fridge for Saturday's IPA brewing, but I forgot to make the starter Friday, so I ended up having to use dry 1056 bought the day of the brewing.

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Old 02-06-2006, 05:39 PM   #5
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you could do what some english brewies do (youngs) which is take some of that groovy trub and dump it into your boiler, which would be an exceelent yeast nutrient. youve got tuns of yeast which you can spare.

no matter what you do ypu will have a kick-ass fermentation with an estimated lag time of -.001 nano seconds

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Old 02-06-2006, 08:14 PM   #6
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I have found that pitching on the cake is the best way to do high gravity ales. Last time I did an IPA, I brewed an English Mild first. Once it was done fermenting, I moved it to the secondary. Then I made the IPA and put it in. Spent the next day cleaning the kitchen, including mopping the ceiling. Had to put the fermenter in the sink.

Did the same thing for my last barley wine, but managed to not blow the blowout.

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Old 02-06-2006, 08:22 PM   #7
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I am going to be trying this next weekend..why waste? I am going to be brewing for the next couple weekends to get stocked up for St. Patrick's Day.

Do you guys just brew up a batch and cool it first, then rack one to the secondary, and the new one onto the yeast to prevent contamination? Also, I assume that since you are working with a full amount of trub, that aeration is not as important? Is this wrong? Do you still give ther fermenter a shake or use a stone or something to get the trub back mixed in?

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Old 02-06-2006, 09:12 PM   #8
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foreword: I've never actually done this myself, but...

if I were going to do it, I think I would rack the 1st batch out of the primary while I was cooling the wort for the 2nd batch (as you said, to minimize contamination.) The carboy would only be empty for a few minutes, and I'd cover the mouth with foil during that time, just in case.

Aeration probably is NOT as important since you've got a massive yeast colony in there already, but someone who has done this might have some input.

As for getting the yeast mixed back in, I think the act of racking the 2nd batch into the carboy would mix it up well enough.

-walker

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Old 02-06-2006, 09:44 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walker
foreword: I've never actually done this myself, but...

if I were going to do it, I think I would rack the 1st batch out of the primary while I was cooling the wort for the 2nd batch (as you said, to minimize contamination.) The carboy would only be empty for a few minutes, and I'd cover the mouth with foil during that time, just in case.

Aeration probably is NOT as important since you've got a massive yeast colony in there already, but someone who has done this might have some input.

As for getting the yeast mixed back in, I think the act of racking the 2nd batch into the carboy would mix it up well enough.

-walker
I just did this on Friday night Walker; you got it. While cooling the wort; rack to secondary the 1st batch. Put your airlock back in primary (re-sanitized). When the other batch is cooled; airate it in the kettle; then siphon it into the primary onto the cake. No need to jostle; stir. That my friends will be taken care of through the rather dramatic fermentation you're about to experience. Better have a 6.5g carboy or bucket though. Your going to need the space. I was 1" from having a blow-off in my 6.5 carboy at 64 degrees.
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Old 02-06-2006, 09:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cweston
Thanks.

Hmm...sounds like a very efficient strategy. The pitching rate must be very high (hence the fast and hard fermentation). I'd think you could get the best of both worlds--scoop out half and save it, pitch on the other half?
I probably wouldn't do this on off chance something gets in there. You can save yeast slurry; wash it etc. but I'd usually pick either or however; rack all onto the cake or go through a yeast harvest for next time you brew. You could save yeast after this next batch is complete; your going to have twice as much. There has been a lot of discussions on saving yeast on the board. Do some surfing here to learn about it.
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