Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Re-Hydrating Yeast
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-15-2012, 02:58 AM   #21
morebeerpls
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: location
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Droot View Post
"I found out later my tap water (well) sucks. The beer is the worst I have made. Still drinkable, but not good. The next batch I just sprinkled the yeast on the wort and had no problems. Good beer."
Probably it was using warm tap water. THe guy who said it should be 90f's = 32*c!!! that is WAY too hot!!

I always rehydrate with the coldest water possible (5-10*c). At pitching the fermenter should be at 18-25 *c. alot lower i think for lagers, but i only do ales.

Sources: various beer guides, kits, and pamphlets.

If you have yeast that activates at 32*c then it is yeast for bread not beer. They are different. Or so i was told.

i was interested in the guy who said that it should be as close to the temp of the wort as possible. Usually i pitch at 23*c or so, but i have never had a problem. I suspect, as with most things with this hobby, it is hard to screw up.
__________________

morebeerpls is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-15-2012, 01:48 PM   #22
MeadLover
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
MeadLover's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Brewer, Maine
Posts: 54
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by morebeerpls View Post
Probably it was using warm tap water. THe guy who said it should be 90f's = 32*c!!! that is WAY too hot!!

I always rehydrate with the coldest water possible (5-10*c). At pitching the fermenter should be at 18-25 *c. alot lower i think for lagers, but i only do ales.

Sources: various beer guides, kits, and pamphlets.

If you have yeast that activates at 32*c then it is yeast for bread not beer. They are different. Or so i was told.
Actually, 32C is just about perfect for Nottingham, as per the company's data sheet. And it's only a little warm for the Safale US-05, as per their data sheet.
__________________

Dave
-------------------------

Primary: Bucksnort Brown Ale, Black IPA, Chai Brown Ale, Chocolate Porter
Secondary: Winter Mead, Peach Ginger Mead
Tertiary: Caramel Apple Mead
Bottled: Honey Brown Ale, Cream Ale
On Deck: not sure

MeadLover is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-17-2012, 12:08 AM   #23
BuckettOfBeer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 44
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Some food for thought:

http://northernbrewer.blogspot.com/2...should-do.html

king'd

__________________
BuckettOfBeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-17-2012, 12:42 AM   #24
MeadLover
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
MeadLover's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Brewer, Maine
Posts: 54
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckettOfBeer View Post
An interesting stance he takes on rehydrating yeast. I would like to know where he gets his information since I've never seen a manufacturer recommend this. I guess it could be argued that dry pitching straight into the fermenter would be rehydrating in wort. But I've seen several references, both from the yeast manufacturers themselves and other people far more experienced on the matter than myself, state that it can be detrimental to the yeast to be rehydrated in wort.

This link has Dr Clayton Cone of Lallemand Lab responding to a question from a homebrew shop owner about rehydrating yeast that says almost the exact opposite.

I personally say do whatever works for you, it's your beer, but for those who do want to rehydrate, I'd prefer them to have the best advice possible.
__________________

Dave
-------------------------

Primary: Bucksnort Brown Ale, Black IPA, Chai Brown Ale, Chocolate Porter
Secondary: Winter Mead, Peach Ginger Mead
Tertiary: Caramel Apple Mead
Bottled: Honey Brown Ale, Cream Ale
On Deck: not sure

MeadLover is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-17-2012, 04:23 AM   #25
morebeerpls
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: location
Posts: 15
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeadLover View Post
Actually, 32C is just about perfect for Nottingham, as per the company's [Literature]
Well, did you read that pdf? You have to cool it down in a very laborious way or it forms and i quote
Quote:
"Attemperate in steps at 5- minute intervals of 10*c to the temperature of the wort. Do not allow attemperation to be carried out by natural heat loss" " temperature shock at greater than 10*c will cause formation of petite mutants> leading to long term incomplete fermentation"
Emphasis mine.


Mutants dude! that tells you something right there!

Besides, this is probably some pro grade yeast what does have a higher than normal tolerance for temp. The pdf says it eventually does its job at the lower temp of the wort. Or at least I assume it is lower temperature, as i dont think its recommended to ferment at 35*c !


The other gentlemens link with some pretty molecules is a bit more convincing however could be completely false and just backed up by pointless images. Most beer kits do say sprinkle it but i always read it was bad.

I am sure you really cant go wrong with modern brewing, if you picture the tools and ingredients that people had to work with, hundreds to tens of thousands of years ago. Its easy to see how we are much better off.
__________________
morebeerpls is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 09:37 AM   #26
dannylerch
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 120
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

I don't use tap water ever. Use spring water that is bottled, when I re hydrate yeast it always starts fermenting later because the yeast starts in the bottom instead of the top.(more air on the top). If you aerated your wort you shouldn't have a problem. If you didn't, you may just have a slow fermentation process. Remember, just because you aren't seeing any activity in your air lock, doesn't mean it isn't fermenting. Take a hydrometer reading and see if it's going anywhere. I'm brewing an Irish stout that didnt start bubbling til 24 hours or more later. now it is bubbling out of control for the last 2 days.

__________________
dannylerch is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 09:44 AM   #27
Cathedral
40oz to freedom
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
 
Cathedral's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 904
Liked 278 Times on 199 Posts
Likes Given: 178

Default

Zombie thread!

__________________
CTHUL:HURTY Picobrewery
On Deck:
Primary: Ex Cathedra IIPA (Weevil Dead v2.0)
Kegged: Jalapeno Cream Ale
Cathedral is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 06:22 PM   #28
dannylerch
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 120
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

oops!

__________________
dannylerch is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2013, 03:24 AM   #29
morebeerpls
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: location
Posts: 15
Default

My tap water is from a glacier. Its good you brought this back up so I can post an update. After posting this some months ago, I stopped re-hydrating the yeast. This is partly to save some time on brewing day, however I have not noticed any difference in sugar absorption in the fermented beer either. (which might not be as scientific as a hydrometer, but its less complicated, messy and more delicious). I am not sure of any other negative effects from not rehydrating.

When I did rehydrate, I stirred it around the same as I do now. Although really, if you picture it like mold or something, the yeast is im sure going to munch munch munch till its all munched away! Although I dont have any science for that.

__________________
morebeerpls is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The microwave and re-hydrating yeast. CharlosCarlies General Techniques 4 07-13-2009 09:47 PM
re hydrating Safale S05 ? WheaYaAt Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 10-07-2008 05:56 AM
Yeast Re-hydrating and Pitching ApolloSpeed Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 10-03-2008 05:01 AM
re hydrating yeast? newbrewr4fun Soda Making 1 07-22-2008 03:05 PM
Hydrating yeast? EamusCatuli Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 01-23-2008 12:32 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS