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Old 05-08-2006, 03:25 AM   #1
blueray
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Default Re-do or leave it be

I have made wine for 20 plus years, but am a novice at home brewing (this forum is great, by the way....). I started a new batch approximately 30 hours ago and didn't notice any obvious fermentation activity for the first 24 hours (no bubbling from the airlock). Wort was at 76 degrees when clearly viable yeast was pitched. In retrospect, I may not have aerated sufficiently, although I would have thought the pour into the primary would have been adequate.
Now, at 30 hours later, it is fermenting with CO2 escaping from the lock.

Should I scrap this batch or leave it alone?
Does a slow start like this tend to leave the beer with an increase of some the compounds responsible for off flavors?

Would appreciate the insights of some veteran brewers out there.

Thanks

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:31 AM   #2
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If it's pushing bubbles through the lock then you're ok. Delayed fermentation can be caused by a wide range of things and is certainly not a reason to pour it out. Infact if the yeast had failed entirely, you could have repitched a new batch of yeast.

Beer is actually pretty forgiving. You can make piles of mistakes-- forgetting to clean something, pitching the yeast too soon, skipping a step and forgetting it till later, sneezing in your primary as you pour in the wort.

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Old 05-08-2006, 04:15 AM   #3
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Leave it be for sure..... and cover when you sneeze into your primary!

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Old 05-08-2006, 05:00 AM   #4
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Thanks for the advice, gentlemen.

Just in the past couple of hours, the fermentation seems to have progressed to being quite vigorous. The lock is releasing a bubble every 8-10 seconds.

I was simply discouraged by the lack of activity early on.

Fingers remain crossed.

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Old 05-08-2006, 01:58 PM   #5
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Some ales are like old guys in their caddies, they take a long time to get up to speed, but once they're cruise'n...

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Old 05-08-2006, 02:03 PM   #6
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It's not uncommon at all for the fermentation lag time to be in the 24 to 48 hour range. I usually start to panic a bit if it gets close to 48 hours, but then I relax and have a beer and the yeast eventually get busy eating my sugar.

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Old 05-08-2006, 06:07 PM   #7
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Yeah I was the exact same way my first brew... I woke up the next morning to find no airlock activity, I thought something was seriously wrong, I freaked out and posted tons of questions on HBT... delayed fermentaion, everything went smooth. Just relax and have a brew.

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