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Old 06-14-2009, 03:24 AM   #1
culaslucas
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Default Question about excess yeast in hydro sample

So I've had this Saison fermenting for over a month and it just won't get down to target FG. Right now I'm at about 1.013 and am targeting 1.008. Not a big deal though...

But I just took a hydro sample and there was a ton of yeast in it - way more than usual. My question is - how would this effect the FG? In the finished product I estimate I'll have 10% less suspended yeast than was in the hydro sample. Will my FG be higher or lower??

I would take another hydro sample but my test jar is so big, I don't want to waste any of the beer.

Thoughts?

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Old 06-14-2009, 06:56 AM   #2
brian_g
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I've wondered the same thing. Does yeast in suspension affect the gravity?

Also, get a smaller test container. You can also sanitize the container and the hydrometer and poor it back. I know some people say this creates a risk of infection. I done it without any problems. I don't see how the risk is greater then the rest of the home brew process.

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Old 06-14-2009, 11:25 AM   #3
HomebrewJeff
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Originally Posted by brian_g View Post
I've wondered the same thing. Does yeast in suspension affect the gravity?

Also, get a smaller test container. You can also sanitize the container and the hydrometer and poor it back. I know some people say this creates a risk of infection. I done it without any problems. I don't see how the risk is greater then the rest of the home brew process.
Personally, I would not recommend dumping anything back into the fermenter after it comes out. If you are using a plastic hydrometer tube (as most are), it can have tiny scratches on the surface that can be very difficult to clean / sanitize, even with star san. For the 1/2 cup or so of beer you lose, it's a big risk IMO to possibly infecting the entire batch.

I don't believe that yeast will make a significant impact to the FG, but I wasn't really able to find any information to back that up.
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Old 06-15-2009, 03:28 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by HomebrewJeff View Post
Personally, I would not recommend dumping anything back into the fermenter after it comes out. If you are using a plastic hydrometer tube (as most are), it can have tiny scratches on the surface that can be very difficult to clean / sanitize, even with star san. For the 1/2 cup or so of beer you lose, it's a big risk IMO to possibly infecting the entire batch.

I don't believe that yeast will make a significant impact to the FG, but I wasn't really able to find any information to back that up.
If your using the tube that the hydrometer came in, I'd agree. The tube is made of very flimsy plastic which can't stand up to too many proper washings. I assumed the original post was using a different kind of container because he said jar.

I use a plastic tube that looks like a graduated cylinder, but without the markings on it. I wash it out after each use. I only pour the sample back if I sanitize both the tube and the hydrometer. I agree that it is a risk, but I don't think it's a big risk. Any time you remove the lid to your fermentor you are risking infection. Transferring wort to the primary, creates a risk. Transferring beer to the secondary creates a risk. The risk isn't big, but it is a risk. I think that transferring wort from a hydrometer sample is of comparable risk to any other time the lid is removed and the wort is transferred. Whether someone feels that this is a risk worth taking is up to them.
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Old 06-15-2009, 03:41 AM   #5
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I have only had one infection in 5 years of brewing...NEVER dump the tube back in. Your just asking for it. However the contents do make their way into my stomach so i can taste the progress. When i have alot of yeast of fruit debris from wine in the hydrometer sample, i will allow it to settle and then spin the hydrometer so that no bubbles or yeast are able to cling to it. That should minimize the read error from floaties and yeast

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