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Old 04-26-2007, 01:30 AM   #11
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I like the alki pumpkin pie, but, the cooking of the pie would get rid of that.

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Old 04-26-2007, 02:22 PM   #12
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Couldn't you rack the beer off the top in to a carboy. Then strain the pumpkin trub into the carboy through a sanitized sieve or a finer jelly bag to extract the remaining beer? Never dealt with this problem before... heck only just bottled my first batch of beer ever on Saturday... but, I'd think this should remove the majority of unwanted solids.

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Old 04-26-2007, 05:38 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seefresh
Is that with carved pumpkin or canned?
I went to the local farmer's market and picked up a few smaller pumpkins. (Allegedly better for eating, since they have less seeds)
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Old 04-26-2007, 07:47 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chimchim5040
I went to the local farmer's market and picked up a few smaller pumpkins. (Allegedly better for eating, since they have less seeds)
Actually, many of the traditional orange "jack-o-lantern"-looking pumpkins (regardless of size or number of seeds) aren't the best for eating (or, one would assume, brewing). There are literally hundreds of varieties of "pumpkin", and many of the good ones for eating (including those that end up in cans at the grocery store) don't look like "pumpkins" at all. They might be blue-green or tan, and be shaped more like acorn or butternut squash.

You'll probably get much better results (ie more pumpkin flavor, more fermentables) from an acorn squash, or by asking at the farmers market "what's the best pie pumpkin". Just don't be surprised if they hand you something that doesn't look like you could carve a face into it...
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Old 04-27-2007, 01:35 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patch
Couldn't you rack the beer off the top in to a carboy. Then strain the pumpkin trub into the carboy through a sanitized sieve or a finer jelly bag to extract the remaining beer? Never dealt with this problem before... heck only just bottled my first batch of beer ever on Saturday... but, I'd think this should remove the majority of unwanted solids.

Patch
This would probably not be a good Idea. Too much risk of oxidation.


All you can do is live and learn, and enjoy the pumpkin brew you do have!
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Old 09-18-2012, 03:17 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by chimchim5040 View Post
I have brewed two pumpkin ales in the last year and found it much easier to cube the pumpkin, caramelize in the oven, then put the cubes into a grain bag for the boil.... No muss, no fuss!!
Hello,
At what temperature and how long to you bake the pumpkin to caramelize it? It is fresh pumkin that you are talking about? I plan on making pumkin ale in a week and I am trying to figure out the best method to clean up the beer from the goop in the fermentor. Thanks for the tip.
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Old 09-18-2012, 01:20 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gosnelgk

Hello,
At what temperature and how long to you bake the pumpkin to caramelize it? It is fresh pumkin that you are talking about? I plan on making pumkin ale in a week and I am trying to figure out the best method to clean up the beer from the goop in the fermentor. Thanks for the tip.
You get an A for searching, but an F for resurrecting a 5 year old thread. Most of the highly discussed pumpkin beer recipes cite an oven temp, typically 350 to 400. Doesn't really matter much, and you're not really caramelizing the pumpkin since it has so little sugar.
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:15 AM   #18
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Mash the pumpkin, don't boil it. I spread pumpkin puree on a cookie sheet and baked it for an hour at 350 then threw it in the mash. The beer has a nice creamy smooth pumpkin flavor. Mashed for 1 hour at 155.

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Old 09-19-2012, 12:41 PM   #19
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Mash the pumpkin, don't boil it. I spread pumpkin puree on a cookie sheet and baked it for an hour at 350 then threw it in the mash. The beer has a nice creamy smooth pumpkin flavor. Mashed for 1 hour at 155.
^^Agreed. I mashed the pumpkin for mine and had very little pumpkin in the fermenter once it was said and done. I got the same result - smooth pumpkin flavor and mouthfeel.

Don't get caught up in using a million pounds of pumpkin in your recipe; the flavor comes from the spices you use, not the pumpkin itself.
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Old 09-20-2012, 07:02 PM   #20
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^^Agreed. I mashed the pumpkin for mine and had very little pumpkin in the fermenter once it was said and done. I got the same result - smooth pumpkin flavor and mouthfeel.

Don't get caught up in using a million pounds of pumpkin in your recipe; the flavor comes from the spices you use, not the pumpkin itself.
Good point. There's a recent Basic Brewing episode where they do a blind taste test of a beer brewed with both pumpkin and spices and one brewed with only spices. The one with only spices was chosen blindly as the better pumpkin ale.
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